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Carleton Connects Lecture Program

Carleton Connects logoAlumni, do you miss the intellectual life of Carleton, delving into new ideas with your classmates and favorite professors? Rediscover it through Carleton Connects, a monthly series of online presentations featuring both familiar and rising new faculty (and other special guests). 

Each Carleton Connects program is one hour, with 30-40 minutes of presentation by faculty followed by a period of questions and answers.  Because these events are by phone and/or online, you can participate wherever you happen to be! On the first call with Prof. Roy Grow, alumni from seven foreign countries dialed in to participate.

Check back soon for information and to register for our May 6th program with Professor Joel Weisberg, Dept of Physics and Astonomy, on his work with The Last Pictures Project.

Past Speakers

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Adriana Estill
    Created 15 April 2014; Published 16 April 2014
    Carleton Connects: Adriana Estill

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Adriana Estill?  You can experience it here!

    In shows as disparate as Ugly Betty, Modern Family, and House, U.S. primetime television has increasingly been interested in playing with genre by invoking Latin American telenovela conventions. How is the telenovela made visible? What relationship does it have to our national anxieties over Latino demographic growth? How is U.S. television mediating the way that we can and should know Latin America? Join Carleton Connects for Professor Adriana Estill's presentation of "How and Why the Telenovela Haunts U.S. Primetime TV in the 21st c."

    About the Speaker

    Adriana Estill teaches courses on U.S. Latino/a literature and twentieth century American literature, especially poetry. She also teaches in the American Studies program. She has published essays on Sandra Cisneros and Ana Castillo and recently contributed to the Gale encyclopedia of Latino/a authors with scholarly entries on Sandra María Esteves and Giannina Braschi. Her interest in popular culture has led to published articles on Mexican telenovelas and their literary origins as well as to current research into the perceptions and constructions of Latina beauty in contemporary Latino literature and the mass media. Degrees: Stanford B.A.; Cornell, M.A., Ph.D.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Dave Musicant
    Created 25 March 2014; Published 25 March 2014
    Carleton Connects: Professor Dave Musicant

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Dave Musicant?  You can experience it here!

    Wikipedia describes itself as “a collaboratively edited, multilingual, free Internet encyclopedia” with “30 million articles in 287 languages”. Who actually contributes to Wikipedia, and how does that affect the text within? What biases can be found throughout Wikipedia? Join Carleton Connects for Professor Dave Musicant’s presentation “Getting to the Source: Where does Wikipedia Get Its Information From?” 

    About the Speaker

    Dave Musicant is a Professor of Computer Science at Carleton College.  Joining Carleton in 2000, Musicant’s research focuses on solving machine learning and data mining problems as well as collaborative human/computing systems.  He is currently working on understanding the dynamics of people working with online collaborative communities such as Wikipedia.  At Carleton, he teaches Introduction to Computer Science, Data Structures, Programming Languages, Artificial Intelligence, Database Systems, and Data Mining.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Professor Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh
    Created 26 February 2014; Published 26 February 2014
    Carleton Connects: Professor Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh? You can experience it here!

    Have you ever thought about the environmental politics behind your morning cup of coffee? Join Carleton Connects as Professor Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh, Department of Environmental Studies, presents "The Vulnerability and Resilience of Coffee Growers to Seasonal Food Insecurity".  In addition, she will also discuss land-use/cover change dynamics and ecosystem services provided by shade-grown coffee farms in Central America.

    Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh is the Robert A. Oden, Jr. Postdoctoral Fellow for Innovation in the Liberal Arts in Environmental Studies.  She received her BA from Gustavus Adolphus College and her doctorate from Indiana University.  Her research focuses on land-use/cover change, carbon dynamics, and land use management activities in tropical rainforest ecosystems and coffee agroecological systems.  Joining Carleton in 2012, Mikaela teaches courses on local and global perspectives on agroforestry systems, remote sensing of the environment, coffee ecologies and livelihoods, and urban ecology.

    ---

  • Title slide for Annette Nierobisz's Carleton Connects program
    Created 14 January 2014; Published 14 January 2014
    Carleton Connects: Professor Annette Nierobisz

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Annette Nierobisz?  You can experience it here!

    Carleton Connects joins with Professor Annette Nierobisz to present her current research titled "American Idle: Job Loss Among Aging Americans".  "American Idle" investigates the contemporary experiences of Minnesota workers age 50+, who have lost employment in a period marked by a severe economic recession, a subsequent long-term jobless recovery, decline of longstanding institutional protections for workers, and a dramatic inversion of the population age demographic. Thirty-one in-depth interviews reveal the insurmountable struggle older workers face from this unprecedented and volatile confluence of socio-economic conditions. The interviewees share their experiences of ageism in the job market, neglected medical needs, evaporating retirement funds, a decline from middle class into poverty, and a damaged sense of self. 

    With interests broadly situated in the sociology of work and occupations as well as the sociology of law, Annette Nierobisz’s research explores the social impact of macro-economic forces. Her dissertation, completed at the University of Toronto in 2001, examined how judges decided employment dismissals submitted to Canadian courts over a time span that captured the emergence of downsizing practices and two periods of severe economic recession. A current project examines job loss among aging Americans in a period of economic instability.

    In 2006 Annette was invited to be the Senior Researcher at the Canadian Human Rights Commission. In this two year appointment she completed projects that examined a number of human rights issues including discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, discrimination on the basis of disability, and the discriminatory impact of national security policies.

    At Carleton, Annette's courses include Working Across our Lives; Myths of Crime; Girls Gone Bad: Women, Crime and Criminal Justice; Methods of Social Research; and Introduction to Sociology.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Eric Hillemann, College Archivist
    Created 3 December 2013; Published 3 December 2013
    Carleton Connects: Eric Hillemann, College Archivist

    Join Carleton College Archivist Eric Hillemann for a discussion of his new book A Beacon So Bright: The Life of Laurence McKinley Gould. Chronicling the namesake of Carleton College’s library, long-time geology professor, and fourth President, A Beacon So Bright illuminates the extraordinary life of world-famous polar explorer Larry Gould, who dedicated much of his life to promoting higher education, and helped shape Carleton College into a “beacon so bright” for generations of students.

    Eric Hillemann has been the Carleton College Archivist in Northfield, Minnesota since 1990. He received his masters degrees from the University of Wisconsin where he studied American History and Library and Information Science.  From 1990-2010, Hillemann also coached the Carleton College Academic Quiz Bowl team which captured two national championships under his tutelage.  His first book, "A Beacon So Bright: The Life of Laurence McKinley Gould" was published in 2012.

  • History Professor and Department Chair Susannah Ottaway (Early Modern European History)
    Created 12 November 2013; Published 12 November 2013
    Carleton Connects: Professor Susannah Ottaway

    While it seems most things are going from the physical to the virtual, Carleton's Humanities Center has been doing just the opposite.  From its virtual inception in 2011 to this year's establishment of a physical office in the Weitz Center for Creativity, the Humanities Center is on the ground building upon interdisciplinary spaces and institutions within the college to ensure that Carleton makes the best possible use of opportunities to connect between faculty, students, staff, and even the Northfield community.  

    Join us as Professor of History and Director of the Humanities Center Susannah Ottaway '89 presents the Humanity Center's exciting work, including this fall's Lucas lecture featuring renown author Salman Rushdie visit and accompanying events.

    Susannah Ottaway is a historian of Early Modern Europe who focuses on the history of aging, poverty, social welfare and the family. She grew up in the Hudson River Valley, and then came to the Midwest to get her BA at Carleton College before returning to the East Coast for her MA and PhD studies at Brown University.  She returned to Carleton as an assistant professor in 1998, and teaches courses on the French Enlightenment and Revolution, Irish history, Early Modern Britain, and the History of Poverty and Social Welfare, as well as survey courses on Early Modern Europe.

    Her current research focuses on the history of institutions for the poor, and she is completing a book manuscript that is a narrative history of the workhouse in England in the long eighteenth century (c. 1660-1834).

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Neil Lutsky
    Created 22 October 2013; Published 23 October 2013
    Carleton Connects: Neil Lutsky

    The famous (or infamous) Milgram "obedience" experiments are now 50 years old.  Recent research--new studies, interviews with participants in the original studies, and reviews of materials in Milgram's archives at Yale--suggests we may need to revise our understanding of these experiments and our assessments of their ethics.  In this October Carleton Connects program, Professor Neil Lutsky, Department of Psychology,  will present "You Must Attend! What You Don't Know About The Milgram Experiments" where he will summarize what we now know about what are, arguably, psychology's most influential studies.

    Neil Lutsky, (Ph.D., Harvard University) teaches courses in social psychology, social cognition, personality, general psychology, positive psychology, and quantitative reasoning. He is a former president of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Division 2 of the American Psychological Association) and the 2001 recipient of the Walter D. Mink Undergraduate Teacher Award given by the Minnesota Psychological Association and the 2011 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award given by the American Psychological Foundation. He directed a 2004-2008 Department of Education FIPSE grant to Carleton on "Quantitative Inquiry, Reasoning, and Knowledge," and has served on the Board of Directors of the National Numeracy Network. His professional interests include the teaching of psychology, quantitative reasoning, the social psychology of obedience to authority, psychology and the Holocaust, and the study of therapy, relationship, and other life endings.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Nancy Braker '81, Puzak Family Director of the Cowling Arboretum
    Created 10 June 2013; Published 11 June 2013
    Carleton Connects: Nancy Braker '81, Puzak Family Director of the Cowling Arboretum

    Missed Carleton Connects: Nancy Braker '81, Puzak Family Director of the Cowling Arboretum?  You can experience it here!

    Each year during Reunion we host tours of the Arboretum.  The most common remark we hear from alumni is something like “I feel disoriented – what used to be here?” The Arboretum has undergone vast changes in the past 20 years since the first Arboretum Manager was hired. In the past five years these changes have accelerated as the College has provided additional levels of support and grant funding has been available.  This presentation will provide information on the over-all goals of the Arboretum, recent restoration and management activities, faculty research and class use.  While some of your favorite places in the Arb may look different we hope you will find new or additional favorite places as you hear about how our students are learning and benefiting from this important College resource.

    Nancy Braker (BA Carleton; MS University of Minnesota - Entomology) is a conservation biologist.  She has 20 years of experience working for The Nature Conservancy in land management, conservation planning, and monitoring of rare species populations, specializing in management of fire adapted natural communities.  Nancy oversees all aspects of management of the Cowling Arboretum and McKnight Prairie, and works with faculty, students and outside users on research and use of the properties.

     

  • Assistant Professor Andrew Flory, Dept of Music
    Created 2 May 2013; Published 2 May 2013
    Carleton Connects: Professor Andrew Flory

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Andrew Flory ? You can experience it here!

    The success of Motown Records during the 1960s and 1970s garnered a level of attention in mainstream society that was previously unthinkable for a company that specialized in black cultural forms.  One of the curious aspects of Motown’s legacy is ways in which historians, critics, and musicians alike commonly cite a generic Motown style, or “Motown Sound.”  Join Assistant Professor of Music Andy Flory as he presents “The Motown Sound”.  He will discuss Motown’s famous “sound” from a number of vantage points, including marketing and self-categorization, musical tropes, and self-dialogue. In this presentation, he will show the parameters through which the agents involved in the creative process, the physical spaces of the Motown “campus” on West Grand Boulevard in Detroit, and the vertical (and not-so-vertical) integration of writing, arranging, performing, and recording contributed to a musical uniformity in select areas of Motown’s output during the company’s most productive period. 

    ANDREW FLORY (American Music, Music History) received the B.A. from the City College of New York and the M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andrew teaches courses in American music, focusing on rock, rhythm and blues, and jazz. Andrew was a member of the Royster Society and was awarded the John Motley Morehead Fellowship to complete his dissertation, which was awarded the Glen Haydon Award for Outstanding Dissertation in Musicology from the UNC Music Department. . He has written extensively about American rhythm and blues, and is an expert on the music of Motown. His book, I Hear a Symphony: Listening to the Music of Motown, is forthcoming from The University of Michigan Press. Working directly with Universal Records, Andrew has served as consultant for several recent Motown reissues. He is also co-author of the history of rock textbook What’s that Sound (W.W. Norton).

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Professor William North
    Created 7 March 2013; Published 7 March 2013
    Carleton Connects: Professor William North

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Bill North? You can experience it here!

    On February 11, 2013, Pope Benedict XVI surprised the world when he announced his plans to abdicate from his position as pope, leader of the Roman Catholic Church.  Although he is not the first to do so, a papal abdication has not occurred since Pope Gregory XII in 1415, almost 600 years. In this Carleton Connects presentation, "Uncharted Waters or a Remembrance of Things Past?  Medieval Perspectives on Papal Abdication", Associate Professor of History Bill North offers a historical vantage point from which to consider these recent events. Please join us as he explores the reactions and reflections of medieval observers as they tried to make sense of the first time the vicar of St Peter handed back the keys.

    Professor North came to Carleton in 1999 as a medieval historian. In addition to being an Associate Professor of History, he is also the Co-director of the Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program (MARS) and Coordinator of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program. He offers a wide variety of seminar and survey courses in European Studies and History. He has a strong command of Latin and medieval and classical Greek. Fluent in Italian, he is also comfortable with French, German and Spanish. He has included a number of his translations as source materials for students to refer to on his MARS website.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Anthropologist Bruce Whitehouse '93 and Professor Cherif Keita
    Created 16 February 2013; Published 18 February 2013
    Carleton Connects: Anthropologist Bruce Whitehouse '93 and Professor Cherif Keita

    Missed Carleton Connects: Anthropologist Bruce Whitehouse '93 and Professor Cherif Keita? You can experience it here!

    The largest territory in the world under Al Qaeda's control is currently the northern half of Mali, West Africa. Yet as recently as last winter, Mali was considered a paragon of democratic governance in the region and the host of a regular Carleton study abroad program. Join Bruce Whitehouse '93, anthropologist at Lehigh University, for a presentation entitled "Mali's Trajectory from Donor Darling to Failed State," and a discussion of what Mali's crisis means for the rest of the world.  He will be joined for a Q&A session with Carleton Professor Cherif Keita, Department of French and Francophone Studies.

    Bruce Whitehouse is a cultural anthropologist with interests in migration, development, marriage, demography, Islam and sub-Saharan Africa. Since the early 1990s he has spent more than five years in Africa, working in or traveling to a dozen sub-Saharan countries. Most of his fieldwork concerns populations living in or emanating from the western Sahel region, particularly the country of Mali. This part of the world offers fascinating perspectives not only on the diversity of human societies but on global processes of economic and cultural transformation. In hisresearch he has sought to illuminate some of the ways Africans carve out spaces for themselves in the contemporary globalized world.

    Chérif Keita is Professor of French and Francophone Studies (Ph.D., University of Georgia). He teaches Francophone Literature of Africa and the Caribbean, as well as advanced languages courses. A native of Mali, he has published books and articles on both social and literary problems in contemporary Africa. His special interests include the novel and social evolution in Mali, Oral tradition, and the relationship between music, literature and culture in Africa. . “Cemetery Stories: A Rebel Missionary in South Africa”, his second documentary traces the relationship between John Dube and a Northfield missionary family who mentored him and educated him in the United States.  Professor Keïta also leads a Carleton Francophone off-campus studies program to Mali every other year.  

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Professor Devashree Gupta and Ed Bice '88
    Created 30 January 2013; Published 30 January 2013
    Carleton Connects: Professor Devashree Gupta and Ed Bice '88

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Devashree Gupta and Ed Bice '88? You can experience it here!

    While many people use social media in their daily lives, have you ever considered using it to spark a revolution? Join Carleton Connects for Professor Devashree Gupta's presentation "Meet Me At the Corner of Facebook and Twitter: Social Movements and Protest in the Digital Era."  She will focus on the role that "Internet 2.0" -- social media in particular -- play in mobilizing activists and staging protests. Using examples, including the Arab Spring uprisings and the "hacktivism" of groups like Anonymous, she will map out some of the different ways in which the internet can play a role in protest, talk about ways in which this relationship between virtual activism and activism in the physical world is evolving, and identify some of the challenges that emerge when protest goes online, wholly or in part.  She will be joined by Ed Bice '88, founder and CEO of Meedan, an online English-Arabic news-sharing forum that played a major role during the Egyptian revolution of 2011.  He will provide comments and answer questions during the Q&A. 

    Professor Devashree Gupta teaches in the Department of Political Science.  She received her PhD in Government from Cornell University. Her research focuses on issues of nationalism, social movements and protest, and political extremism, with a particular focus on the politics of Britain, Ireland, and South Africa.  She has published her work in Mobilization, PS: Political Science & Politics, Comparative Politics, and Comparative European Politics. She is currently working on a book manuscript that explores the dynamics of radicalization and competition in nationalist movements as well as smaller projects on social movement coalitions as well as the political engagement of diaspora and immigrant communities in Europe. She teaches the introductory class in comparative politics as well as courses on social movements, comparative nationalism, ethnic conflict, religion and politics, and research methods. Prof. Gupta is the coordinator of the international relations track.

    Ed Bice '88 is Meedan’s founding CEO. A co-chair of the U.S.-Palestinian Partnership (UPP) and the Middle East Strategy Group, Ed has represented Meedan at enough global conferences to have tapped out his phones contact list capacity. He fervently believes that the diversity and openness of the internet is the key indicator of human progress. While he resists the label, having helped to guide Meedan’s successful transition to a technology design and development consultancy, Ed is sometimes tagged as a social entrepreneur.  Joi Ito included Ed in his 2008 book Freesouls, portraits of 296 people working to build the open web. Ed holds a US patent on hybrid human and machine translation and has been published in national press including the NY Times, New Republic, and Mother Jones, and has been interviewed on national and international radio news programs like NPR, BBC, and CBS. He attended Carleton College where he received a B.A. in philosophy. When he is not editing staff bios and sending emails, Ed folds laundry and cooks with garlic in Woodacre, California.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Professor Cindy Blaha
    Created 13 December 2012; Published 13 December 2012
    Carleton Connects: Professor Cindy Blaha

    Missed Carleton Connects: Professor Cindy Blaha? You can experience it here!

    Have you ever wondered how astronomers take such beautiful pictures of the night sky?  Are you interested in the mechanics of how those pictures are taken? Do you ever wonder just what you are seeing as you stare up into the cosmos?  Join Carleton Connects for Professor Cindy Blaha's presentation, "Visual Astronomy: There's More Than Meets The Eye".  Professor Blaha will take us on a tour through the December skies using images taken at Carleton in Goodsell Obesrvatory and beyond. She will also discuss how astronomers create images of the moon and other cosmic entities as well as the science behind it. 


    Professor Cindy Blaha teaches in the Department of Physics and Astronomy where she is the Marjorie Crabb Grabisch Professor of the Liberal Arts.  She is an astrophysicist interested in the optical and radio properties of star formation and evolution in the disks and nuclei of spiral galaxies.

  • A placard image for media work Carleton Connects: Vice President and Treasurer Fred Rogers '72
    Created 15 November 2012; Published 19 November 2012
    Carleton Connects: Vice President and Treasurer Fred Rogers '72

    Missed Carleton Connects: Vice President and Treasurer Fred Rogers '72?  You can experience it here!

    The cost of higher education and concern about student debt levels have featured prominently in the media this year. A recent national tuition and student aid survey offers brighter news: in 2012-13, tuition and fees at private colleges and universities increased an average of 3.9 percent – the lowest rate in at least 40 years – while institutional student aid increased 6.2 percent. While the financial challenges facing students and their families are still very real, this is encouraging news. Keeping institutional costs down and ensuring affordability for students from all backgrounds, while providing a world-class education is a key priority for Carleton and at the heart of our strategic plan. Join Carleton Connects as Carleton’s Vice President and Treasurer, Fred Rogers '72 discusses how the College is addressing these challenges and offer insights about Carleton’s future.

  • John Harris '85
    Created 24 October 2012; Published 24 October 2012
    Carleton Connects: John Harris '85, Prof. Steven Schier, Alex Burns

    With two weeks to go before the November election, John Harris '85 offered a scoop on the year's big issues during the panel presentation "The 2012 Presidential Election: What's Happening and Why." Politico cofounder and editor-in-chief John Harris '85, Alex Burns, national correspondent for Politico, and professor Steven Schier, our resident presidential expert and the Dorothy H. and Edward C. Congdon Professor of Political Science engaged in a lively discussion with Carleton alumni.  

     


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