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Past Course Offerings

Spring '13

A Journey in Journalism - ENGL 272 - Doug McGill  (23 students)

In this workshop-style class in journalistic storytelling, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students become working journalists reporting on Carleton and Northfield events as well as broader social issues, personalities, and trends of their choosing. Working in a multimedia lab, students will create and publish their stories online in a variety of digital platforms and styles. Guided by the journalistic values of truthfulness, fairness, and serving the public interest, students in this class may choose stories of any locale and scale and work in any online medium they choose--from blogging and still photography to videos, podcasts, and infographics.

Carleton in the Archives: Studies in Institutional Memory and Culture - HIST 115 - Paul Petzschmann (16 students)

Ours is a world of institutions - schools, corporations, government agencies - that shape the way we act, think, and remember. The memory of institutions themselves, the records they keep and the way these repositories are organized and used is crucial for their functioning and survival. What is the relationship between "official" and "individual" memory in the making of an institutional world? We will explore this and related questions through readings, discussion, and a hands-on project based on materials in Carleton's own archives.

Museums, Monuments, and Memory - HIST 285 - B. Horrigan (12 students)

"History" is not just the name of a department at Carleton College; "History-making" is an activity engaged in by everybody, everyday. We watch historical movies, listen to political leaders invoking history in making policy, tour historic sites and museums, etc. We listen to our elders tell us stories about their lives, and we tell ourselves stories that place our experiences into the historical continuum. This course ranges widely over the varied and sometimes risky terrain of contemporary history-making in Minnesota and beyond to examine preservation organizations, museums, archives, oral history projects, documentary films, historic sites, schools, theater, TV, and cyberspace. 

Introduction to Peace Studies -SOAN 236- N. Saidei (7 students)

Peace studies is an evolving and emerging holistic interdisciplinary study of collective harmony and collective violence. In this course we will study the alternative definitions of peace and examine the relation between peace and a variety of societal factors including modernity, post modernity, international anarchy, forms of state, cultural construction of violence, religious prejudice, patriarchy, nuclear weapon, ecology, militarism, globalization and a global civil society and culture. 

 

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Kelly Connole (10 students)

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students will do research and design publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.


Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - EDUC 386 - Cathy Oehmke (7 students)

The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. The course will cover instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension.  Students for this class will partner with students from the Prairie Creek Community School to work on reading skills.

Senior Seminar - EDUC 395 - Deborah Appleman (9 students)

This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Recent seminars have been on educational reform and reformers, service learning, literacy leaders in education, education and the emotions, and personal essays about education. Some off campus work with public school students and teachers is an integral part of the seminar.  The academic civic engagement component for this class will focus on charter schools.


Global Religions in Minnesota - RELG 289 - Shanna Sippy (15 students plus 4 independent study students)

This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with hands-on research with living communities in Minnesota including Muslims in Faribault, Hindus in Eagan, and Cambodian Buddhists in Hampton. The studies and experiences may be published online.

Food Justice -POSC 223- Pat Cavanaugh (21 students)

Systems for growing, processing and distributing food have been subject to claims that they are unjust, yet problems persist. This course will examine concepts of justice and apply them to issues related to farmworkers, factory workers and others who produce our food, poverty and access to food, and genetically modified organisms as they relate to control of production.  We will ask how justice relates to sustainability.  Although the course will focus on the United States, global issues such as immigration and food sovereignty will be included.  Students will have the opportunity to explore food justice issues in other countries. 

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcón (20 students)

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. Each student will take on a project based on their own interests.

Abrupt Climate Change -ENTS 288- T. Ferrett (15 students)

The field of abrupt climate change seeks to understand very fast changes, or "tipping points," in historical climate records. Course topics include interpretation of historical climate data, methods of measuring abrupt changes in ancient climates, theories for abrupt change, the role of complex earth systems, and the connection to trends in global climate change. The course will directly address our future vulnerability to abrupt climate change through cases studies of past human civilizations. Includes a term-long multimedia team project, with an academic civic engagement component, at the intersection of abrupt climate change and an issue of human concern. 

Peru Off-Campus Studies Program- (20 students doing civic engagement components)

Independent Studies: SCOPE, Global Religions Project, PSEO (12 total students)

 

 

Winter '13

Methods of Social Research -  SOAN 240 - Annette Nierobisz (19 students)

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable. The class will partner with the NESNA neighborhood association around Carleton and develop a survey for them and partake in interviews examining the meaning of community and building neighborhood ties for both elder residents and college students.

Immunology -BIOL 310- Debra Walser-Kuntz (33 students)

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Foundations of Modern Europe -HIST 139- Susannah Ottaway (22 students)

A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe, with particularly close examination of the history of Spain. 

Africans in the Arab World: On Site and Revisited -HIST 286- T. Willis (6 students)

This course is the second part of a two-term sequence. It begins with a two-week December-break trip to Dubai, UAE, to visit museums, mosques, other heritage sites, universities, media outlets, and markets. It promotes dialogue with Afro-Arab women around the historical constructions of gender, race, and ethnicity in heritage sites, Islam, Arab media, academic institutions, and popular culture. Ultimately, students will ponder Afro-Arab women's voice and visibility beyond the home in this Arab society. Then upon return to Carleton, students will reflect upon their experiences in the UAE, analyze their data, and present it in oral, written, and visual formats.

Anthropology of Health and Illness -SOAN 262- P. Feldman-Savelsberg (16 students)

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Women's Lives in Pre-Modern Europe -HIST 236- Victoria Morse (6 students)

Did women have a Renaissance? Were women increasingly relegated to a separate sphere from men: "domesticated" into the household? Or, on the contrary, is the history of European women characterized by fundamental continuities? This course seeks to answer these questions through an exploration of women's place in the family and economy, laws and cultural assumptions about women, and women's role in religion. Throughout the term, we will be focusing not only on writings about women, but primarily on sources written by women themselves, as we seek a fuller understanding of the nature of European women's lives before the modern era.

Materials Science, Energy, and the Environment -ENTS 262- Melissa Eblen Zayas (27 students)  

Drawing on chemistry and physics principles, this course will focus on the relationship between the structure and physical properties of materials, how materials science can address environmental and energy challenges, and the technological and societal impacts of materials development. Topics to be covered will vary from year to year, but may include material life cycle assessment, traditional plastics and biodegradable alternatives, materials and technologies for solar energy conversion, and the role of materials in developing energy efficient buildings. 

Methods of Teaching Science -BIOL 302- D. Walser-Kuntz (10 students)

This course will explore teaching methods for the life and physical sciences in grades 5-12. Curricular materials and active learning labs will be discussed and developed. In addition, time outside of class will be spent observing and teaching in local science classrooms. Will not count toward a biology major.

 

Fall '12

Early Medieval Worlds -HIST 137- Bill North (44 students)

Through the intensive exploration of four "worlds" in the early Middle Ages (Late Antique Italy, Anglo-Saxon England, Carolingian Europe, the Holy Roman Empire) this course seeks to offer an introduction to formative political, social, and cultural developments in Europe between c. 250 and c.1050s. Particular attention will be paid to the sources of our knowledge of early medieval people and polities. Development of a student-designed public exhibition on early medieval books and scribal culture will be an essential element of the course. Students will be bringing these outreach projects to three different local schools.

Agroforestry Systems: Local and Global Perspectives -ENTS 247-Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh (13 students)

This course will examine the principles and practices of tropical and temperate agroforestry systems. Focus will be given to the ecological structure and function of agroforests, the economic costs and benefits of agroforests, and the social context in which agroforests operate. Specific topics include plant/soil relationships, competition and complementarity, biogeochemical cycling, design principles, and the synergies and tradeoffs among economic, social, and ecological management goals.

Educational Psychology - EDUC 234 - Deborah Appleman (24 students)

Educational Psychology brings together theory and classroom experience to help Carleton students form a better understanding of teaching and learning.  Carleton students act as classroom assistants and tutors in local schools, giving them a context with which to understand their studies.  This experience also gives students a chance to reflect upon education and its practices in a hands-on and practical manner.

Methods of Political Research -POSC 230- Greg Marfleet (22 students)

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. 

Geomorphology -GEOL 210- Carrie Jennings (24 students)

Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota. Laboratories and field trips included.

Media and Election Politics: 2012 Election  -POCS 100- Barbara Allen (16 students)This seminar introduces basic methods of political analysis through a case study of media and politics in the 2012 elections. Students will participate in a study of election advertising and produce projects to be displayed at an exhibition. Concepts from public opinion analysis and political psychology will be used to understand the 2012 campaigns. Our work will focus on content analysis of the effects of campaign ads and news coverage.

Media and Electoral Politics: 2012 United States Election -POSC 204- Barbara Allen (29 students)

Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news using our multi-year data set of content analyzed election ads and news. These will be presented at a political engagement exhibition. We study a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods to learn how political communication affects U.S. elections.

Comparative Social Movements -POSC 358- Dev Gupta (21 students)

This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.

Spring '12

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Kelly Connole (12 students)

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students will do research and design publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.

Plant Biology - BIOL 236 - Susan Singer (31 students)

Both the Northfield School District and Prairie Creek, a local Charter school, have made substantial changes in their school lunch programs to emphasize healthy food choices and local food sources. Students in this course will study the nutritional effects of various plant-based lunches, and will create trading cards to teach students about healthy snacking.

Topics in Virology - BIOL 370 - Debby Walser-Kuntz (19 students)

The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host. Students will work on one of three projects. One group will meet with Northfield and Faribault high school students interested in medical careers and organize a career event for them. Another group will work with the Gender and Sexuality Center to develop educational materials, and another will partner with Daniel Groll's Bioethics class to prepare a presentation on ethical issues in mother-child transmission of AIDS and refusal of medication.

Classical Mythology - CLAS 111 - Clara Hardy (3 of 31 students)

We will study a selection of the most famous Classical myths through close reading of Homer, the Greek tragedians, Ovid and other ancient sources. In addition we'll discuss the most prominent of modern modes of myth interpretation, in an attempt to determine how myth speak - both to the ancient world and to us. The course's civic engagement component will involve working with local 4th and 5th graders.

Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - EDUC 386 - Cathy Oehmke (3 students)

The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. The course will cover instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension.  Students for this class will partner with students from the Prairie Creek Community School to work on reading skills.

Senior Seminar - EDUC 395 - Anita Chikkatur (11 students)

This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Recent seminars have been on educational reform and reformers, service learning, literacy leaders in education, education and the emotions, and personal essays about education. Some off campus work with public school students and teachers is an integral part of the seminar.  The academic civic engagement component for this class will focus on charter schools.

Environmental Law and Policy - ENTS 310 - Kim Smith (5 of 15 students)

This seminar will examine topical issues in domestic and international environmental law and policy. Students will aim to understand how environmental laws work to achieve policy objectives, with attention also to debates about the role of markets and community-based environmental management. This year, students will be looking at a policy analysis of the Ames Mill Dam in downtown Northfield. They will examine the current environmental issues surrounding the dam as well as its history.

The French Art of Living: Tradition, Myth, Reality - FREN 349 - Cathy Yandell (22 students)

Through literature, art, architecture, and theory, students will explore French notions of what it means to live well, from Renaissance sumptuousness to existentialist questioning to the depiction of immigrants’ lives in contemporary Paris. The program will examine the ways in which the physical environment fashions attitudes and practices that define the good life (urban and rural settings, the north and the south, housing projects and seascapes). Whenever possible, course readings and student writing will be linked with experiential learning in Paris and southern France. Students will volunteer in the banlieux (primarily diverse low income school districts) of Paris. 

Introduction to Statistics - MATH 215 - Bob Dobrow (55 students total, 2 sections, 4 students did additional independent study projects)

Students will analyze member surveys of satisfaction and interest in Northfield Senior Center. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables.

Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization - POSC 209- Pat Cavanaugh (11 students)

This class will explore concepts of democracy, power, identity, and sense of place as we examine cases of citizen mobilization. The class will research a current case study of an environmental controversy that gave rise to citizen mobilization. Some students will look at the Wind Farm proposals in Red Wing, Minnesota and their impact on endangered species in that area. The class will examine the conflicting views of different environmental organizations. Another group will research in depth the political backgrounds of five different foods and prepare materials for tabling in Sayles to educate students on the political impact of these foods.

Language and Deception - PSYC 375 - Mija Van Der Wege (9 students)

In this course, students participate in the development of a local episode of Mental Engineering, a television program based in the Twin Cities that brings together academics and commentators to analyze advertisements. This year, the Carleton students will work in three groups to prepare for and perform a mock episode of Mental Engineering, to be hosted by the host of Mental Engineering, John Forde. Two of the performances will be done with students from The Key, a local youth center. The project enables students to apply insights that they have developed from course material to an analysis of advertisements.

Law, Religion, Morality - RELG 275 - Terrance Wiley (27 students)

This course examined normative and descriptive accounts of the law, particularly in relation to politics, morality, and religion. Students researched juvenile justice for the New York based think tank The Center for NuLeadership on Urban Solutions.

Global Religions in Minnesota - RELG 289 - Shanna Sippy (10 students)

This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with hands-on research with living communities in Minnesota including Muslims in Faribault, Hindus in Eagan, and Cambodian Buddhists in Hampton. The studies and experiences may be published online.

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcón (19 students)

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. Each student will take on a project based on their own interests.

Methods of Social Research -  SOAN 240 - Annette Nierobisz (13 students)

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable. The class will partner with the Northfield Downtown Development Corporation and partake in interviews examining the direction of development in the downtown area. The class will also interview Carleton alumni currently living in town about the state of Northfield's "knowledge-based economy" and through examining quantitative data they will compile a presentation on the subject.

Washington D.C.: A Global Conversation (2 courses) - POSC 288/289 - Greg Marfleet (22 students -off campus)

Students will participate in a seminar involving meetings with leading Washington figures in areas of global policy making and regular discussions of related readings. Barbara and Greg will take students to Washington DC where they will be doing internships with DC policy organizations.Students will engage with leading scholars and practitioners in the field of political communication to learn how mass media, particularly TV news, influences politics. We will be especially attentive to United States news coverage of international events in new and old media and its importance in international relations, domestic perceptions of global political concerns (e.g. climate change and universal declarations of human rights). Our seminar readings will draw on research in political psychology and democratic theory.


Winter '12

Ireland: The Origin of the Troubles - HIST 245 - Susannah Ottoway (21 students)

This course examines the roots religious and political tensions and violence in modern Irish history, focusing on Anglo-Irish relations. Students will share their research by giving presentations and timelines to Northfield High School's World History classes.

Performing Politics - DANC 255 - Stuart Pimsler (15 students)

This course focuses on individual identity and community-based art, using movement, theater, writing, and voice to explore how politically influenced performance art. Students in this class perform regularly, and will participate in a final performance open to the public. The course will also hold several community workshops in Faribault, one with high school students and another with diabetes patients.

Introduction to Peace Studies - SOAN 236 - Nader Saiedi (25 students)

Peace studies is an interdisciplinary exploration of how harmony and violence function collectively. With an appreciation of the various understandings of peace, this course will study the relationship of peace to modernity, the state, cultural violence, religion, patriarchy, militarism, and much more. Students will have the option of participating in a weekend-long workshop at Carleton facilitated by the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP), a Quaker initiative focused on creating peaceful spaces and relationships, particularly in prisons, where the project was started by inmates. After completing the training, students will write a reflective essay on their experience and how it informed their understandings of the concepts discussed in class.

Anthropology of Health and Illness - SOAN 262 - Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg (8 of 23 students)

In this course students partnered with HealthFinders and Growing Up Healthy. Students working with Growing Up Healthy conducted library-based research to better understand specific subpopulations (such as the Somali population in Faribault) and specific issues (such as refugee mental health, or culturally specific presentation of symptoms) of relevance to GUH's goals. Those working with HealthFinders helped developed and administered surveys to English and Spanish speakers. Students also organized and led focus groups and did participant observation of waiting rooms.

Field Investigation in Comparative Agroecology - ENTS 261 - David Hougen-Eitzman (12 students)

This course succeeds a two-week visit to China over winter break, where students studied leaders in China's emerging sustainable agriculture movement. Site research included visits to Chinese farms and conversations with sustainable agriculture researchers. This term, the class will develop a curriculum for a variety of age groups of elementary school students. The curriculum will focus on discussing the basics of and differences between agriculture in the US and China. Hands-on activities will be used, including growing squash plants under different nutrient treatments.

Multicultural Education - EDUC 238 - Anita Chikkatur (4 of 25 students)

This class explores theories and strategies for how to teach and learn in a way that respects differences of race, culture, social class, gender, and sexuality. A small group of students in this class will participate in a project to interview Somali parents in Faribault about their views on early childhood education.

Human Reproduction and Sexuality - BIOL 101 - Matt Rand (35 students)

Countering widespread misconceptions about sexuality, this class studies the biology of sex to better understand many aspects of the reproductive process. Participants in this course will work with different groups of local public school students, from elementary to high school ages. Project topics will range from movies to state sex education standards.

Immunology - BIOL 310 - Debby Walser-Kuntz (35 students)

Students will become familiar with the immunology-related primary literature and apply course concepts to real-world problems. Groups will explore one of the following topics in depth: asthma and air pollution, type 2 diabetes and the role of the immune system, or exercise and immunity. Each topic represents an active area of immunology research and a public health issue that can be explored in our local community. Students in the course will write a research paper that requires analysis and synthesis of experimental evidence. Simultaneously, they will also gather and analyze data from the community--including interviews and discussions with their community partners--to gain practical information related to their topic. In collaboration with the community partners, the students will develop a finished product to be used by their community partner.

Statistics: Concepts and Applications - MATH 215.01 and 215.02 - Katie St. Clair (64 students)

This course emphasizes helping students interpret statistical information. The class focused on a statistical problem of the Northfield Senior Center's wish to survey 50- and 60-year-olds about their needs from the senior center and their decision to participate in the senior center. After using this example as a thought experiment, the class shared their findings with the Northfield Senior Center.

Winter Independent Studies: TORCH PSEO, SCOPE, Northfield Senior Center

Independent studies with ACE components include students serving as teaching assistants for high schoolers from TORCH taking online college courses, working as interns in the middle school's SCOPE history enrichment program, and supporting the Northfield Senior Center in designing a questionnaire to meet the needs of local seniors.


Fall '11

Audio Workshop - CAMS 275 - John Schott (16 students)

Geology of Soils - GEOL 258 - Mary Savina (20 students)

Statistics: Concepts and Applications - MATH 115 - Katie St. Clair (23 students)

This course emphasizes helping students interpret statistical information. The class focused on a statistical problem of the Northfield Senior Center's wish to survey 50- and 60-year-olds about their needs from the senior center and their decision to participate in the senior center. After using this example as a thought experiment, the class shared their findings with the Northfield Senior Center.

Experimental Economics - ECON 266 - Lauren Feiler (8 students)

In this course, students will learn how experiments can test and improve economic theory. In addition to studying a range of experimental research, students will create their own economic experiments. The course's civic engagement component centers on a partnership with Be The Match, a national marrow donation registry. Students' goal will be to develop an economic understanding of the decision to donate bone marrow.

Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood - CGSC 385 - Kathy Galotti (11 students)

 Memory, perception, attention, problem-solving, and conceptual thinking are all developing rapidly between the ages of 6 and 11. This course will study how academic and social contexts can affect these developments. Key to students' understanding of cognitive development in middle childhood will be their observation of elementary schoolers at Sibley Elementary.

Masquerades in Africa - HIST 282 - Thabiti Willis (13 students)

Currently on display in the Gould Library is an exhibit featuring the practices studied in this course: masquerade rituals, their cultural meanings, and the histories they recreate. Students will be creating a second exhibit for the library, to present the imagery and interpretations they discovered during the term. Additionally, the class will host fourth and fifth graders visiting from Prairie Creek Community School to share their exhibit and explain the work that went into making it.

Measured Thinking: Reasoning with Numbers about World Events, Health, Science and Social Issues - IDSC 100 - Neil Lutsky (18 students)

In public, professional, personal, and academic life, numbers are essential elements of information and arguments. Students in this class will learn about the use and misuse of numbers for social, political, and scientific purposes. The class will host Running the Numbers, an exhibit of photographer Chris Jordan's work. Following his artistic style, the students will help middle school art classes visually represent important numbers.

Ecosystems Ecology - BIOL 221 - Daniel Hernandez (20 students)

This course studies the Earth's major ecosystems.  Students will learn about the processes that constitute ecosystems, as well as the contemporary issues affecting various ecosystems. For the course's civic engagement component, the class will partner with St. Olaf students to organize trips for Greenvale Park Elementary third graders to learn about the ecosystems of Minnesota, while also studying decomposition, herbivory, pollination, and food webs.

Nonviolent Social Change: Theory and Praxis - RELG 276 - Terrance Wiley (10 students)

Nonviolent direct action has created major social and political change across the planet in the last century. This class focuses on the emergence of the theory of nonviolence and the social movements that nonviolent theory helped create and shape. Students in this class will have the opportunity to participate in a weekend-long workshop led by the Alternatives to Violence Project. Those who attend will be trained to participate in nonviolence workshops in prisons both locally and worldwide.

Educational Psychology - EDUC 234 - Deborah Appleman (22 students)

Educational Psychology brings together theory and classroom experience to help Carleton students form a better understanding of teaching and learning.  Carleton students act as classroom assistants and tutors in local schools, giving them a context with which to understand their studies.  This experience also gives students a chance to reflect upon education and its practices in a hands-on and practical manner.

Race, Immigration, and Urban Schools - EDUC 340 - Anita Chikkatur (6 students)

This course explores the important role that public schools, particularly in urban areas, have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to prepare them to participate as citizens in a democracy. One group of students is working with a newly created theater class at Northfield High School for students learning English as a Second Language, and another group is delivering a presentation on college preparation to Spanish-speaking parents of elementary and middle school students.

Health Psychology - PSYC 260 - Ken Abrams (25 students)

Students in small groups will critically examine the effects of local public (e.g., town) or private (e.g., hospital) policies on health outcomes. More specifically, students will work with local policy makers to investigate an issue, propose policy changes supported by theory and research, present formal proposals to the policy makers, and solicit and respond to community feedback. Additionally, groups will present their findings to the class and community representatives at a poster session at the end of the term. Examples of past projects include the development of a heroin use prevention program at Northfield High School, a comprehensive worksite wellness program at Northfield Hospital, and a more accessible and better marketed farmers' market in Northfield.

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcón (20 students)

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement.

Intermediate Spanish - SPAN 204.03; 204.08 - Maria Elena Doleman (40 students)

Students in this course are required to spend at least 7 service hours (1 hour per week) working in partnership with the Northfield Public Schools from elementary to high school. In some situations college students work with other students in the Northfield Compañeros program. In other positions, students work in classrooms directly as ESL tutors. In addition to language, the course focuses on immigration and Latino experiences. This project illuminates the local experience of immigrants in Northfield.


Spring '11

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Juliane Shibata - 8 students

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students will do research and design publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.

Environmental Analysis Lab - CHEM/ENTS 329 - Deborah Gross - 2 students

In this lab students will work on a project to assess the air quality in buildings on the Carleton campus, and potentially in the Northfield community. Special attention will be given to determining the particulate matter (PM) concentration, and the contribution of silica to the PM. Results will be reported to occupants of the relevant buildings. In addition, students will have an opportunity to design and carry out their own multi-week experiments which may involve engagement either on campus or in the community.

Art, Religion, and Globalization - RELG 281 - Shanna Sippy - 17 students

Tracing the history of exhibiting cultures, beginning in the late nineteenth century, this class considers how religions and traditions are represented in different contexts with a range of political and social implications. Student wills work with artists-in-residence to consider the role performance plays in constructions of rituals, religions and cultures. Supported, in part, by a MN State Art Grant, the course involves bringing Ragamala, a Minneapolis-based South Indian Dance company, in-residence to Carleton and Northfield over the course of a month. The students in the class, along with Ragamala Company members, will work with students at the Northfield School of Arts and Technology (ARTech) to teach an appreciation for South Asian cultural art forms and the challenges of "representing" and performing culture.

Native American Religious Freedom - RELG 243 - Michael McNally - 13 students

This course explores historical and legal contexts in which Native Americans have practiced their religions in the United States. Making reference to the cultural background of Native traditions, and the history of First Amendment law, the course explores landmark court cases in Sacred Lands, Peyotism, free exercise in prisons, and sacralized traditional practices (whaling, fishing, hunting) and critically examines the conceptual framework of "religion" as it has been applied to the practice of Native American traditions. Service projects will integrate academic learning and student involvement in matters of particular concern to contemporary native communities.

Topics in Probability and Statistics - MATH 315 - Katie St. Clair - 6 of 19 students

Plant Biology - BIOL 236 - Susan Singer - 31 students

Both the Northfield School District and St. Dominic, a Catholic elementary school in Northfield, have made substantial changes in their school lunch programs to emphasize healthy food choices and local food sources. Students in this course will study the nutritional effects of various plant-based lunches, and will create a messaging campaign to encourage students to take advantage of these new lunch options. Students in Katie St. Clair's probability course will measure the effectiveness of these efforts as part of their curriculum.

Women's Health Activism - WGST 250 - Meera Sehgal - 22 students

This course focuses on women’s health movements and feminist activism around reproductive justice in the U.S.. Our explorations will be linked to a Carleton art gallery exhibition titled EveryBody! that highlights the use of graphic teaching aids, polemical publications and artistic projects by women’s health movements to teach women to celebrate “embodied self-knowledge”. Our intellectual focus will be on the role of feminist activism in shifting the discourse around women’s health from medicalized pathology to empowerment. The course will have a civic engagement component that encourages students to develop creative visual approaches to feminist health education in the community

Introduction to Peace Studies - SOAN 236.00 and 236.02 - Nader Saiedi - 8 students

Peace studies is an interdisciplinary exploration of how harmony and violence function collectively. With an appreciation of the various understandings of peace, this course will study the relationship of peace to modernity, the state, cultural violence, religion, patriarchy, militarism, and much more. Students will have the option of participating in a weekend-long workshop at Carleton facilitated by the Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP), a Quaker initiative focused on creating peaceful spaces and relationships, particularly in prisons, where the project was started by inmates. After completing the training, students will write a reflective essay on their experience and how it informed their understandings of the concepts discussed in class.

Microbiology w/laboratory - BIOL 234 - Debby Walser-Kuntz - 25 students

Democracy, Diversity, and Education - EDUC 365 - Anita Chikkatur - 8 students

Many Americans expect our public schools to make young people into good citizens who will sustain our democracy. But how are good citizens different from good people or good workers? How do we make good citizens? How can education sustain a democracy? What role do group identities play in shaping this educational process? How do ideals of justice and equality - as well as realities of injustice and inequality - influence our educational system? This course will explore these questions and others by studying both theories and case studies of democratic education and multiculturalism. Students will also serve in and observe at three local public schools: a Spanish-language kindergarten class in Northfield, a girl-focused charter middle school in St. Paul, and a K-8 school focused on Native American students and cultures in Minneapolis. Their experiences with the students and educators in these schools will inform the class's exploration of politics, culture, and education.

Social Welfare - SOAN 215 - Peter Brandon - 5 students

This course asks students to investigate a welfare controversy and take a stand on the issue. Students use a variety of mixed methods to explore a topical issue at the local level.  Past projects have included a needs-based study of transportation in Northfield, especially for low-income Northfielders.  Students interviewed community leaders and partners and those in need to identify action plans, and helped spark the development of the Northfield Grassroots Transit Initiative, which continues to advocate for better transportation access in the region.

Ethnic Foodways in the U.S. - AMST 252 - Audrey Russek - 19 students

Students will conduct oral history interviews with individuals and organizations involved in ethnic/regional food in Southern Minnesota. The goal is to investigate the history, culture, and economics of this local community. Students will organize transcripts from these interviews into a course website that draws attention to the ethnic food community, and will also draw on the interviews as sources in their final research paper.

Methods of Teaching Mathematics - MATH 349 - Deanna Haunsperger - 10 students

Environmental and Agricultural Politics of the Americas - ENTS 246 - Garrett Graddy - 26 students

Social and Environmental Movements of Latin America - ENTS 253 - Garrett Graddy - 20 students


Winter '11

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcón - 17 students

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. The winter section will focus on policy, including readings and discussions centered around the Project Pericles Debating for Democracy hosted at Carleton in January.

Immunology - BIOL 310 - Debby Walser-Kuntz - 35 students

Students will become familiar with the immunology-related primary literature and apply course concepts to real-world problems. Groups will explore one of the following topics in depth: asthma and air pollution, type 2 diabetes and the role of the immune system, or exercise and immunity. Each topic represents an active area of immunology research and a public health issue that can be explored in our local community. Students in the course will write a research paper that requires analysis and synthesis of experimental evidence. Simultaneously, they will also gather and analyze data from the community--including interviews and discussions with their community partners--to gain practical information related to their topic. In collaboration with the community partners, the students will develop a finished product to be used by their community partner. 

Community Video - CAMS 285 - Paul Hager - 5 students

Students are partnering with local organizations such as Growing Up Healthy, Northfield Youth Baseball, Cannon River Sportsmens Club, and campus organizations such as the GSC, to create media in support the organization's mission. Media production can range from short, non-fiction videos to photo essays, web design and podcasts. Students are also working with organizations to help them develop a media plan. 

Introduction to Latina/o Studies - AMST 127 - Adriana Estill - 13 students

 In collaboration with Growing Up Healthy, students are presenting their research on Latinos in the United States to leaders in Northfield's Latino community. At events in both Faribault and Northfield, students are participating in conversations about the importance of family, religion, health, and education in creating a strong Latino community. Student work focuses on understanding how research on national trends relates to the personal experiences of local Latinos.

Multicultural Education - EDUC 238 - Anita Chikkatur - 8 of 25 students

This course focuses on the respect for human diversity in education, especially in relation to various racial, cultural, and economic groups, and to women. Students will have the opportunity to reflect on and apply classroom topics in a variety of service learning settings, including the Northfield TORCH project's college access program in collaboration with Riverland Community College.

Schooling and Opportunity - EDUC 353 - Anita Chikkatur - 12 students

As a part of the course, the students work in small groups to develop a case study of a local program designed to increase educational access and opportunities. The research involves interviews with program directors and participants, as well as data and document analysis and a literature review. At the end of the term, the final papers will be shared with those involved with the programs so that they can use the research to improve their programs. 

African in the Arab World - HIST 280 - Thabiti Willis - 9 students

This course surveyed the development of an African diaspora in the Arab world. Students spent time at S.A.F.E. (Somali American Faribault Education), a local non-profit run for and by members of Faribault's Somali community. They conducted oral interviews and discussions about the Somali diaspora with community members at the S.A.F.E. classes.

Global Religions in Minnesota - RELG 289 - Shanna Sippy - 9 students

This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with hands-on research with living communities in Minnesota including Muslims in Faribault, Hindus in Eagan, and Cambodian Buddhists in Hampton. The studies and experiences may be published online.

Economic Cost-Benefit Analysis - ECON 268 - Aaron Swoboda - 13 students

Community Needs Assessment* - SOAN 275 - Peter Brandon - 16 students
* Part of the Comparative Welfare Systems and Social Safety Nets in Australia Program


Fall '10

Geology in the Field - GEOL 100 - Mary Savina - 14 students

As part of the coursework, students will examine stones used in buildings around Northfield or in their hometowns to determine the geologic histories of these rocks. The Northfield Historical Society will collect and archive the products of this research.

Air Pollution and Human Health - CHEM 100 - Deborah Gross - 14 students

A recent assessment of public health in Minnesota counties gave poor marks to Rice County, especially with regard to its air quality. Students in this class will perform their own air quality measurements in and around Northfield in order to scrutinize the methods and findings of the study and examine how air quality affects the lives of local residents.

Intermediate Spanish - SPAN 204.01; 204.04; 204.05 - Maria Elena Doleman and Linda Burdell - 59 students

Students in this course are required to spend at least 7 service hours (1 hour per week) working in partnership with the Northfield Public Schools from Elementary to High School. In some situations college students work with other students in the Northfield Compañeros program. In other positions, students work in classrooms directly as ESL tutors. The Spanish course focuses on, in addition to Spanish language, issues of immigration and the Latino experience. This project turns the focus on the local experience of immigrants in Northfield.

Native American Religions - RELG 130 - Michael McNally - 28 students

While surveying a broad variety of ways that Native American traditions imagine land, community, and the sacred, the course focuses on the local traditions of the Ojibwe and Lakota communities. Materials include traditional beliefs and practices, the history of missions, intertribal new religious movements, and contemporary issues of treaty rights, religious freedom, and the revitalization of language and culture. Students will have the opportunity to engage with some of Minnesota's Native American cultural institutions, including the Anishinabe Academy magnet school in Minneapolis.

Intro to Educational Studies  - EDUC 110 - Anita Chikkatur - 23 students

Students will have the option of gaining hands-on experience as tutors in new after-school programs at Faribault Middle School and High School. These programs attempt to improve college access for local children and will provide Carleton students with the chance to apply and refine skills learned during the course.

Educational Psychology - EDUC 234 - Deborah Appleman - 24 students

Educational Psychology brings together theory and classroom experience to help Carleton students form a better understanding of teaching and learning.  Carleton students act as classroom assistants and tutors in local schools, giving them a context with which to understand their studies.  This experience also gives students a chance to reflect upon education and its practices in a hands-on and practical manner.

Environmental Ethics - ENTS 215 - Kimberly Smith - 24 students

This course allows students apply the ethical debates in environmental policy and practice to five case studies in Northfield. In groups of five to six, students spend the term investigating environmental ethics behind a range of current and pertinent issues in the college and in Northfield. In the process, they get the opportunity to work with actors and stakeholders in the community and consider how environmental ethics play a role in these cases.

Comparative Social Movements - POSC 358 - Devashree Gupta - 16 students

Students in this political science course looked at different social movement theories, including literatures on organizational structures, recruitment, tactical choice, and message framing.  Students then applied this knowledge by working with community partners to plan and carry out an event tied to a particular issue or policy area in which they had an interest and that was related to the core work of the community partner.  Groups worked on a range of issues, including advocacy for homeless GLBT youth and green technologies and planning in Northfield.  Students were encouraged to reflect on their experiences and link their practical work back to the course readings and discussions through a series of blog posts and an end-of-term presentation.

Introduction to Geospatial Analysis - ENTS 120 - Tsegaye Nega - 21 students

After studying the theory and practice of GIS technology, students applied their skills to spatial problems around campus and the country. Projects included determining the ideal placement of the second Carleton wind turbine, the effectiveness of campus lighting, Carleton buildings where solar panels would be effective, and examining home prices around Minneapolis's Hiawatha Line light rail corridor. Students presented their projects at a public poster session.


Spring '10

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcon and Carolyn Fure-Slocum - 21 students

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work.  Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects, or to reflect upon the college's role in Haiti or Faribault, two areas where college members are actively engaged.  Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement.

Language and Deception - PSYC 375 - Mija Van Der Wege - 14 students

In this course, students participate in the development of a local episode of Mental Engineering, a television program based in the Twin Cities that brings together academics and commentators to analyze advertisements. This year, the Carleton students will work in three groups to prepare for and perform a mock episode of Mental Engineering, to be hosted by the host of Mental Engineering, John Forde. Two of the performances will be done in the Northfield community, at the high school or middle school, and the third will be in the library Athenaeum for public attendance. The project  enables students to apply insights that they have developed from course material to an analysis of advertisements.

Race, Immigration and Urban Schools  - EDUC 340 - Anita Chikkatur - 11 out of 20 students

This course explores the important role that public schools, particularly in urban areas, have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to prepare them to participate as citizens in a democracy. Students will have the opportunity to engage in community-based research in Faribault with afterschool programs for Somali children.

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Kelly Connole -13 students

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students did research and publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.

The Politics of Food - POSC 220 - Pat Cavanaugh - 16 students

Students in this class will present their research on food politics in panel discussions open to the public. They will address questions such as: What do tomatoes have to do with slavery?  How did soybeans move from a minor crop to a mega-industry?  How has Coca-Cola remained relevant for so long?  How has the shrimp industry, past and present, affected marine environments around the U.S.?  Are breakfast cereals part of a complete breakfast?

Environmental Ethics - ENTS 215 - Kimberly Smith - 21 students

Educational Studies Senior Seminar - EDUC 395 - Deborah Appleman - 12 students


Winter '10

Anthropology of Health and Illness - SOAN 262 - Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg - 9 of 25 students enrolled

In this course students partnered with HealthFinders and Growing Up Healthy. Students working with Growing Up Healthy conducted library-based research to better understand specific subpopulations (such as the Somali population in Faribault) and specific issues (such as refugee mental health, or culturally specific presentation of symptoms) of relevance to GUH's goals. Those working with HealthFinders helped developed and administered surveys to English and Spanish speakers. Students also organized and led focus groups and did participant observation of waiting rooms. This project culminated in a presentation to the Board of HealthFinders.

Public Sociology - SOAN 395 - Adrienne Falcón - 8 students

Students in this course conducted needs-based assessments of Northfield and the Rice Country area to identify potential projects and collaborations between Carleton and local organizations. Groups of students focused specifically on the arts, business, and housing sectors. Within these sectors, students interviewed staff members of local organizations and government offices. At the end of the term, students created reports of their sectors and presented their findings in a presentation in which community partners were invited to attend.

Health Psychology - PSYC 260 - Ken Abrams - 25 students

Students in small groups will critically examine the effects of local public