Winter 2011: Challenges for our Students in the 21st Century

LTC: Rubrics, Research Practices and Student Writing

Created 17 February 2011; Published 14 March 2011

What can we learn from student writing about the sophistication of their research practices? Reference librarians have analyzed papers from sophomore writing portfolios for three years to explore how students use evidence to support their arguments. You may be surprised by what they've discovered. Presenters: Iris Jastram, Reference & Librarian for Languages and Literature; Heather Tompkins, Reference & Instruction Librarian for Humanities; Danya Leebaw, Reference & Instruction Librarian for Social Sciences.

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Other Items

  • Created 22 February 2011; Published 14 March 2011
    LTC: Teaching the Museum: Exploring New Learning Spaces at Carleton

    The exhibition spaces at the Weitz Center for Creativity will offer students, faculty, and staff new opportunities for curricular exploration and experimentation. Come learn more about the teaching museum concept; tools for more effectively utilizing Carleton's art and artifact collections; and ways of integrating the idea of the exhibit into course assignments. Presenters: Steven Richardson, Director of the Arts; Laurel Bradley, Curator of the College Art Collection; Victoria Morse, Professor of History and Director of the Viz Grant; Mary Savina, Charles L. Denison Professor of Geology.

  • Created 17 February 2011; Published 14 March 2011
    LTC: Rubrics, Research Practices and Student Writing

    What can we learn from student writing about the sophistication of their research practices? Reference librarians have analyzed papers from sophomore writing portfolios for three years to explore how students use evidence to support their arguments. You may be surprised by what they've discovered. Presenters: Iris Jastram, Reference & Librarian for Languages and Literature; Heather Tompkins, Reference & Instruction Librarian for Humanities; Danya Leebaw, Reference & Instruction Librarian for Social Sciences.

  • Created 10 February 2011; Published 14 March 2011
    LTC: Being Virtually Ethical: What's Fair Game in Online Research?

    Do you need to obtain consent to study Facebook pages? Can you gather data for your research by lurking in a chat room? These are only some of the issues raised by research on the Internet. Come discuss these intriguing issues, and help the Institutional Review Board (IRB) establish policies on internet research. Presenters: Kim Smith, Associate Professor, Political Science & Environmental Studies; Paula Lackie, Academic Technologist; Mija Van Der Wege, Associate Professor of Psychology.

  • Created 1 February 2011; Published 14 March 2011
    LTC: Creating Confident, Independent Learners and Leaders

    How can we encourage students to take more ownership of their education? Why do Carleton students rank lower than their peers at other institutions in confidence and perceived leadership abilities? Together we will tackle these vexing questions, which have been the subject of Carleton's participation in the Wabash II National Study of Liberal Arts Education. Presenters: Jim Fergerson, Director of Institutional Research and Assessment; Cherry Danielson, Associate Director of Institutional Research and Assessment; Mary Savina, Professor of Geology and Faculty Assessment Coordinator; Julie Thornton, Associate Dean of Students.

  • Created 25 January 2011; Published 11 February 2011
    LTC: Joan Baez at Spring Hill College: A Study of Intersecting Histories

    On May 7, 1963 Joan Baez gave a concert at Spring Hill College in Mobile Alabama. This little-known performance takes on extraordinary significance when viewed from the intersection of multiple histories: social, musical, institutional, and personal. This presentation reveals the larger meaning of this event using eyewitness accounts, photographs, and a precious unreleased live recording, which includes Baez’s comments on the racial climate. Presenter: Steve Kelly, Dye Family Professor of Music. An Angelina Weld Grimke Brown Bag Conversation, co-sponsored with African/African-American Studies.

  • Created 18 January 2011; Published 14 March 2011
    LTC: Academic Integrity: Policies, Processes, and Perspectives

    Academic honesty is essential to any academic institution. Faculty, staff, and student members of the Academic Standing Committee (ASC) will briefly share their concerns and perspectives on the state of academic integrity at Carleton, and invite us to discuss this very timely issue. Presenters: Joe Baggot, Associate Dean of Students; Liz Ciner, Director of Student Fellowships; Muira McCammon, '13; Amy Becker, '11.

  • Created 11 January 2011; Published 11 February 2011
    LTC: A&I 1.0: The 2010 Experience and Beyond

    The newly-required Argument and Inquiry seminars build on the strengths of past first-year seminars, adding explicit attention to evaluating information and constructing arguments. In this session, A&I instructors reflect on the experience and share preliminary assessments of what A&I students learned about finding and evaluating information in research. Presenters: Peter Balaam, Associate Professor of English and Coordinator of Argument & Inquiry Seminars; Andrew Fisher, Associate Professor of History; and Annette Nierobisz, Associate Professor of Sociology.

  • Created 6 January 2011; Published 14 March 2011
    LTC: "Father Chaucer, Obscene Chaucer"

    Chaucer has served as a boundary marker for definitions of obscenity and pornography for generations. This talk reviews legal cases involving George Carlin's comedy routines, Florida textbooks, and 1970s "soft-core" pornography, among other sources, as signs that Chaucer's work remains vitally involved in American ideas of obscenity. Presenters: George Shuffelton, Associate Professor of English; Discussant: Carol Donelan, Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies. Dialogos Faculty Research Forum, co-sponsored with the Humanities Center.

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