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Shaunna & Sarah Kathryn's Astro Page

Albireo

albiero1-99ss 

This is a 2 second image taken using a clear filter.

albiero2-99ss 

This is a RGB stacked image taken at 2s, 3s, and 6s, respectively.

 

 

 M 104: The Sombrero Galaxy

M104-1-99ss 

This is a 15s image using a clear filter.

M104-2-99ss 

This a 30s image using a clear filter.  Notice that the arms are more distinctive with a longer exposure.

M104-3-99ss 

This a 45s image yet again using a clear filter.  This exposure is long enough to show the dust lane on the edge of the galaxy.

M104-4-99ss 

This image is composed of 3 45s stacked images.

M104-5-99ss 

 The "Mustard" Sombrero Galaxy.  This image is comprised of 45s, 67s, 3x45s RGB photos stacked in Photoshop.  You can see the dust lane in the mustard image here, too. :)

M104-6-99ss 

If you are interested, this link has further images of the Sombrero Galaxy:

http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m104_more.html

 

 

M51:
~~~~Whirlpool Galaxy~~~~

m51whirlpool1-99ss 

45 second clear filter image.

m51whirlpool2-99ss 

55 second clear filter image.

m51whirlpool3-99ss 

65 second clear filter image of Whirlpool Galaxy and distorting companion.

m51whirlpool4-99ss 

75 second clear filter image.  Notice the ever more prominent arms, whirlpooling about.

m51whirlpool5-99ss 

80 second clear filter image.  We probably got some trailing here, but who would notice it with these lovely arms?

m51whirlpool6-99ss 

For more titilating images like this one, see:

http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m051_more.html

 

 

M58: Spiral Galaxy in Virgo

m58spiral1-99ss 

Isn't it cute? It's so tiny.  Anyway, this is a 45 second exposure, clear filter as always.

m58spiral2-99ss 

Still tiny.  50 second exposure, clear filter.

m58spiral3-99ss 

Wow! Now you can see that small, diffuse nucleus.  60 second exposure, clear filter.

m58spiral4-99ss 

Not much better.  70 second exposure, clear filter.

m58spiral5-99ss 

This photo appears at: http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m058_more.html

 

 

M61: Virgo Cluster Spiral Galaxy

M61Spiral-99ss 

50 second exposure, clear filter.  The clouds were approaching when we took this, so we were unable to show the knotted arms with longer exposure times.

Links: http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m061_more.html

 

 

M63: Sunflower Galaxy

M63sunflower-99ss 

50 second exposure, clear filter.  It's tiny but you can see the, no wait, you can't. It's a spiral galaxy even if it looks like a fuzzy blob here.  But you can see the sunflower resemblance.

Links: http://www.seds.org/messier/more/m063_more.html

 

 

 M64: Black Eye Galaxy

m64blackeye1-99ss 

45 seconds, clear filter.  Can't see anything, can you?

m64blackeye2-99ss 

Ooooooooh. Now you can see the LARGE dust lane and the black eye effect.  50 seconds, clear filter.

m64blackeye3-99ss 

Ooooooh. Purdy. And Prominent dust lane.  3, 50 second exposures, clear filter, stacked.

Link: http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m064.html

 

 

Mars

Yup, that's right, The War God's namesake.

mars1-99ss 

.02 seconds, like, duh, we only did clear filters, so it doesn't appear red here.

mars2-99ss 

Same thing, only .01 seconds this time. Only slightly better, we know. But it's the best we can do with our limited resources.

mars3-99ss 

This photo courtesy of: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov

 

 

BLOOPERS!

blooper1-99ss 

Our first attempt at focusing gave us this lovely modern art version of Arcturas.

blooper2-99ss 

Ahhh. Much better. This is Arcturas, in focus, saturating our camera at that magical 65535 number. This is as clear as she gets with Arcturas and our equipment.

blooper3-99ss 

Can YOU find M104 ?

This is what happens when you forget to subtract the dark frame.  This is supposed to be the lovely Mustard Sombrero galaxy.

blooper4-99ss 

Okay, can you guess what this is?

No? Neither could we. We were aiming for M27, the Dumbell Nebula. Those wonderful clouds, an astronomer's nightmare, arrived on the tail end of this picture or we were just cold and tired and had just ordered pizza. You decide. We can't remember. Either way, it is a lovely field of stars, isn't it? :)

This is what it should look like:

blooper5-99ss 

Found at: http://www.seds.org/messier/m/m027.html


This wonderful selection of images was taken with a Meade LX200, F10 with an ST6 CCD Camera

Our images were taken on May 19, 1999.

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This page was created by Shaunna L. Barnhart and Sarah Kathryn Covin.

June 3, 1999