Psychology

Psychology at Carleton provides a systematic approach to the study of behavior and experience. It examines processes of physiological functioning, human and animal learning, human and animal cognition, cognitive and social development, personality, social influence, and psychopathology, and treats particular topics (e.g., prejudice, real-life decision making, and psychopharmacology) that are representative of the diversity and complexity of psychology. It also strongly emphasizes the development of analytic and expressive skills that are the basis of investigation, evaluation, and communication in the field.

Psychology 110 is the basic introductory course in the department and is a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. Only in exceptional circumstances (e.g., an advanced placement score of 4 or 5 or a higher level IB score of 6 or 7) will a student be allowed to enroll in an upper-level psychology course without having taken Psychology 110. Majors in the department generally enroll in mid-level courses in our three core areas:

Biological and Behavioral Processes Courses: 210, 216, 218, 220, 263, 267

Cognitive Studies Courses: PSYC 220, CGSC/PSYC 232, PSYC 234, CGSC 236, PSYC 238

Social Behavior, Development, and Personality Courses: 248, 250, 252, 254, 256, 258, 260

Majors are advised to plan their schedules carefully in light of the prerequisites listed for upper-level courses in each area and the schedule of course offerings. A major in psychology prepares students for graduate study toward an advanced research degree in psychology and for a variety of professional programs and careers in psychological and social service areas. It also serves those intending to pursue careers in law, medicine, education, and business.

Requirements for a Major

  • The introductory course, PSYC 110 or an advanced placement score of 4 or 5 or a higher level IB exam score of 6 or 7, and successful completion of a mid-level course)
  • the measurement and methods course and lab, PSYC 200 and PSYC 201 (to be taken during the sophomore or junior year)
  • four courses from a list of core courses (courses numbered PSYC 210-267, MUSC 227) including:
    • one from the Biological and Behavioral Processes group (PSYC 210, 216, 218, 220, 263, 267)
    • one from the Cognitive Studies group (PSYC 220, 232, 234, 238, CGSC 236)
    • one from the Social Behavior, Development and Personality group (PSYC 248, 250, 252, 254, 256, 258, 260)
  • two upper-level courses (PSYC 318-384, CGSC 380, CGSC 385, CGSC 386) including:
    • at least one seminar (courses numbered 360 to 386)
    • two laboratory courses (PSYC 211, 217, 221, 233, 235, 239, 257, 259, 261)
  • a capstone seminar, PSYC 399
  • the integrative exercise PSYC 400

Particular courses in biology, education, linguistics, mathematics and computer science, economics, philosophy, and sociology-anthropology may also be recommended, depending on an individual's interests and plans.

For future planning purposes, majors graduating in 2017 should have taken capstone seminar PSYC 299/397,398,399 during the spring term of their junior year and will take PSYC 400 during the fall and winter terms of their senior year with their integrative exercise being completed during the fall and possibly winter term of their senior year depending on the nature of their comps. Those majors graduating in 2018 and in subsequent years will take the capstone seminar (PSYC 299 and PSYC 397/398/399) during the fall term of their senior year and their integrative exercise (comps) in PSYC 400 during the winter and spring terms of their senior year.

Psychology Courses

PSYC 110 Principles of Psychology This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment. 6 credits; SI; Fall, Winter, Spring; S. Akimoto, J. Neiworth, A. Putnam, L. Wichlinski, N. Lutsky
PSYC 200 Measurement and Data Analysis in Psychology The course considers the role of measurement and data analysis focused on behavioral sciences. Various forms of measurement and standards for the evaluation of measures are explored. Students learn how to summarize, organize, and evaluate data using a variety of techniques that are applicable to research in psychology and other disciplines. Among the analyses discussed and applied are tests of means, various forms of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, planned and post-hoc comparisons, as well as various non-parametric tests. Research design is also explored. Prerequisite: Psychology 110; Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 201. 6 credits; FSR, QRE; Winter, Spring; K. Abrams, J. Neiworth
PSYC 201 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Psychology 200; Psychology 110. 2 credits; FSR, QRE; Winter, Spring; K. Abrams, J. Neiworth
PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning A summary of theoretical approaches, historical influences and contemporary research in the area of human and animal learning. The course provides a background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, and these are applied to issues such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, decision-making, education, and choice. It is recommended that students enroll concurrently in Psychology 211. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. 6 credits; WR2, QRE, LS; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 211 Laboratory Research Methods in Learning This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. 2 credits; QRE, LS, WR2; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 216 Behavioral Neuroscience An introduction to the physiological bases of complex behaviors in mammals, with an emphasis on neural and hormonal mechanisms. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 216 and 217 to satisfy the LS requirement. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 217. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; LS; Winter, Spring; L. Wichlinski, S. Meerts
PSYC 217 Laboratory Research Methods in Behavioral Neuroscience The course provides instruction and experience in methods of behavioral neuroscience, the study of the inter-relation of the brain (and hormonal systems) and behavior. The focus of this laboratory will be on standard methods of inducing behavioral changes via neural and hormonal manipulations in mammals. Psychology 217 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 216. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 216 and 217 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 2 credits; LS; Winter, Spring; L. Wichlinski, S. Meerts
PSYC 218 Hormones and Behavior In this course, students will learn about how hormones act in the brain and the body to affect behaviors. This course draws heavily on biological psychology and students learn about techniques in neuroendocrinology to better understand cellular function, neural circuits, and the display of behaviors. Team-based learning and case studies are used to explore the endocrine system, sexual differentiation, the stress response, thirst and digestion, and reproductive behaviors. The experimental evidence upon which our understanding of hormones, brain, and behavior is constructed is emphasized. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. Psychology 216 recommended or permission of the instructor. 6 credits; NE, WR2, QRE; Fall; S. Meerts
PSYC 220 Sensation and Perception We will address the question of how humans acquire information from the world to support action, learning, belief, choice, and the host of additional mental states that comprise the subject matter of psychology. In other words "How do we get the outside inside?" We will initially consider peripheral anatomical structures (e.g. the eye) and proceed through intermediate levels of sensory coding and transmission to cover the brain regions associated with each of the major senses. Readings will include primary sources and a text. In addition to exams and papers, students will conduct an investigation into an area of personal interest. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 221. 6 credits; LS; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 221 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement. 2 credits; LS, QRE, WR2; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 232 Cognitive Processes An introduction to the study of mental activity. Topics include attention, pattern recognition and perception, memory, concept formation, categorization, and cognitive development. Some attention is given to gender and individual differences in cognition, as well as cultural settings for cognitive activities. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or permission of the instructor. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 233. 6 credits; WR2, LS; Winter; K. Galotti
PSYC 233 Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Processes Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 232. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement. 2 credits; LS, QRE; Winter; K. Galotti
PSYC 234 Psychology of Language This course will cover a range of aspects of language use. We will spend time discussing language production and comprehension, discourse processing, the relationship between language and thought, and language acquisition. Additionally, we will touch on issues of memory, perception, concepts, mental representation, and neuroscience. Throughout the course, we will emphasize both the individual and social aspects of language as well as the dynamic and fluid nature of language use. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 235. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 234 and 235 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; LS; Fall; M. Van Der Wege
PSYC 235 Psychology of Language Laboratory This laboratory experience will expose students to a variety of methodologies employed by researchers interested in studying language. Throughout the term, students will both participate in experiments and conduct experiments. We will spend time discussing and performing typical analyses. Finally, students will be expected to become proficient in writing their experimental work in APA format and in presenting their research ideas in an oral format. Psychology 235 requires concurrent registration in Psychology 234. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 234 and 235 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 2 credits; LS, QRE; Fall; M. Van Der Wege
PSYC 238 Memory Processes Memory is involved in nearly every human activity: We use our memory not only when we reminisce about the past, but when we study for our exams, talk to our friends, and tie our shoes. This course explores the psychological science of human memory. We will examine different types of memory, how we encode new memories and retrieve old ones, how to ensure a memory is never forgotten, and how to implant a false memory in someone else. In doing so we will look at both old and new research, and discuss how memory research can be applied to some real world environments, such as courtrooms and classrooms. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the field of memory research, be able to evaluate the quality of the studies used as evidence in these debates, and be able to conduct experimental research of your own. You must enroll in both the lecture and a lab section; although you will receive two separate grades for each component, the two will be closely integrated. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 238 and 239 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 239. 6 credits; LS; Spring; A. Putnam
PSYC 239 Memory Processes Lab This course accompanies Psychology 238. Students will replicate classic studies in human memory and will plan and conduct original projects. Students will get experience evaluating research, designing and conducting studies, and sharing their findings in a clear and persuasive manner. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 238 and 239 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 239. 2 credits; LS, QRE; Spring; A. Putnam
PSYC 248 Cross-Cultural Psychology Do psychological principles apply universally or are they culture specific? How does the exploration of psychological phenomenon across cultures inform our understanding of human behavior? This course examines major theoretical and empirical work in the field of Cross-Cultural Psychology. A major component will be on applied products, such as a web site containing 1) a critical analysis of a particular cross cultural psychological phenomenon, and 2) an evidence-based proposal for improving cross cultural interaction. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; SI, IS; Winter; S. Akimoto
PSYC 250 Developmental Psychology An introduction to the concept of development, examining both theoretical models and empirical evidence. Prenatal through late childhood is covered with some discussion of adolescence when time permits. Topics include the development of personality and identity, social behavior and knowledge, and cognition. In addition, attention is paid to current applications of theory to such topics as: day care, the role of the media, and parenting. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. 6 credits; SI, WR2; Fall; K. Galotti
PSYC 252 Personality An examination of analytic models that attempt to characterize and explain aspects of behavior, thought, and emotion that are central to our conceptions of ourselves as distinctly human beings and as individuals. Original theoretical statements and relevant empirical literature will be consulted. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or consent of the instructor. 6 credits; SI; Winter; N. Lutsky
PSYC 253 Research Methods in Personality Laboratory A laboratory to be taken concurrently with Psychology 252, to undertake research on topics in personality. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Psychology 252. 2 credits; SI, QRE; Winter; N. Lutsky
PSYC 254 Psychopathology An introduction to theories, research, treatments, and issues in the field of psychopathology. This course will be run as a seminar. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Recommended Psychology 252. 6 credits; SI; Spring; S. Kozberg
PSYC 256 Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes The social psychological analysis of human social behavior, interpersonal processes, and group influences. Concurrent registration in Psychology 257 is strongly recommended. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; LS; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 257 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 256. 2 credits; LS, QRE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 258 Social Cognition This course will focus on a social psychological analysis of social cognition, perception and judgment. It includes the examination of attitudes, stereotyping, attribution and the self. Concurrent registration in Psychology 259 is strongly suggested. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 258 and 259 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or permission of the instructor. 6 credits; LS; Spring; S. Simon
PSYC 259 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Cognition Students will participate in the design and replication of social psychological studies related to social cognition. This course requires concurrent registration in Psychology 258. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 258 and 259 to satisfy the LS requirement. 2 credits; LS, QRE; Spring; S. Simon
PSYC 260 Health Psychology This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; LS; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 261 Health Psychology Lab This course provides students with direct experience applying principles of health psychology. Students will engage in a term-long self-directed project aimed at increasing the frequency of a healthy behavior (such as exercising) or decreasing the frequency of an unhealthy behavior (such as smoking). Additionally, we will read and discuss case studies that relate to the current topic in the lecture portion of the course. Concurrent registration in Psychology 260 is required. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 2 credits; LS, QRE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 262 Interpersonal Relationships This course is intended to be a research-based examination of close relationships. The goal will be to analyze why and how people think, feel, and behave the way they do toward close others, focusing primarily on romantic partners, but also incorporating research and theory on friendships, family relationships, and workplace relationships. By the end, students will have have an evidence-based understanding of 1) the underlying motivations and goals people bring into various relationships, 2) the rules and norms that seem to govern different types of relationships, 3) the cultural differences in relationship expectations, 4) the positive and negative consequences that relationships can have on people's wellness, and 5) the methods we use as a science to understand each of these four areas. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 is recommended but not required. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 263 Sleep and Dreaming This course will examine recent experimental findings and current perspectives on sleep, dreaming, sleep disorders, and states of consciousness. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 267 Clinical Neuroscience This course will explore brain disorders with significant psychological manifestations, such as Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and substance abuse, among others. Students will also receive a foundation in brain anatomy, physiology, and chemistry so that they may better understand the biological correlates of these clinical conditions. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 290 Cross-Cultural Seminar in Prague: Directed Reading 2 credits; S/CR/NC; Fall; K. Abrams
PSYC 299 Capstone Seminar: General This capstone seminar focuses on issues of interest to all students planning to choose a comprehensive project. The course is a lead in to the more specialized core seminars of Psychology 397, 398, and 399. The goal of the course is to provide a broad review of subject matter and options that would aid students in their selection of a specific topic. Students will then be assigned to Psychology 397, 398, or 399 depending upon discussions and expressed interest. 3 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 300 Special Topics in Psychological Research This course is a hands-on empirical research seminar related to a faculty member’s research program. Students are expected to collect and analyze data, read primary literature, meet regularly with the faculty supervisor, and submit a final paper. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. 1-6 credit; NE; Fall; S. Meerts
PSYC 318 Psychopharmacology This course will cover the major categories of drugs that possess psychoactive properties, with an emphasis on their effects on the nervous system. In addition, drug use and abuse in a larger societal context will be examined. Prerequisite: Psychology 216 or instructor permission. 6 credits; SI; Winter; L. Wichlinski
PSYC 354 Counseling Psychology An introduction to theories, research, techniques, and issues in the field of counseling psychology. This course will be run as a seminar. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 252 is recommended. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 358 Cross-Cultural Psychology Seminar in Prague: Psychopathology In the West mental illness has traditionally been approached with a biomedical model that views it as independent of culture. By contrast the "relativist" position assumes that, to a large extent, human behaviors are culturally determined and that the etiology and manifestation of mental disorders are affected by society and culture. This course will address such issues as well as their implications for assessment and treatment through an examination of several Western and non-Western societies, with a special emphasis on Czech society. There will be several guest lectures by Czech psychology professors as well as excursions within Prague to psychiatric hospitals and clinics, where students will meet with Czech clinicians and patients. Prerequisite: OCS Cross-Cultural Studies in Praque. 6 credits; SI, IS; Fall; K. Abrams
PSYC 362 Psychology of Spoken Words This course explores the cognitive and perceptual processes that allow humans to understand and produce spoken words. We will review major findings on word perception and production, and then focus on specific topics including the perception of accents in speech, language disorders, the links between music and speech, the connection between sounds and meaning, the influence of gesturing on word production, slips of the tongue, bilingualism, tip-of-tongue-states (being temporarily unable to recall a word), and other related issues. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Linguistics 110. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 365 Science and Pseudoscience in Psychology In this seminar we will explore the differences between scientific and pseudoscientific approaches to the study of human behavior. Common characteristics of pseudoscientific approaches as well as tools for critically evaluating claims to knowledge will be identified. Topics covered will include controversial assessment techniques (astrology, hypnosis), treatments for psychological conditions (homeopathy, facilitated communication), treatments for medical conditions (psychic surgery, faith healing), and paranormal phenomena (extrasensory perception, UFO abductions). Students will be encouraged to maintain a healthy degree of skepticism toward controversial claims and utilize a high standard of evidence before accepting them. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or consent of the instructor. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 366 Cognitive Neuroscience It should be obvious that every process that goes on in the mind has physiological underpinnings. But, whether we can unlock the secrets of learning, memory and perception as they are supported by neurons and neural connections is a longstanding and elusive problem in psychology. Contemporary articles are the text for this discussion-driven course. The student should leave the class with a working understanding of brain processes and of contemporary theories of brain processes that may support perception, memory, language, and consciousness. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Biology 125 or Psychology 216 or permission of the instructor. 6 credits; SI, QRE; Spring; J. Neiworth
PSYC 369 Neurochemistry of Love and Sex What is love? This is a question that has been the focus of much discussion, writing, and research for millennia. Romantic love most often consists of both social bonding and sexual attraction; therefore both love and sex have been the focus of much research in both humans and animals. In this class we will examine love and sex from a neurobiological perspective, by reading and discussing empirical studies that explore the hormones, pheromones, neurotransmitters, and brain systems involved in love and analogous processes in non-human animals. Topics will include considerations of sex differences and societal views on sexuality. Prerequisite: Psychology 216. 6 credits; NE, WR2; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 371 Evolutionary and Developmental Trends in Cognition Recent findings have brought to light some very compelling examples of humanlike cognition in nonhuman primates: tool use and tool making, family bonding, complex social behaviors such as cooperation, altruism, communication, and emotion. The study of infant cognition has also revealed more complex cognitive abilities in developing humans. Each of these topics is considered in the context of the cognitive workings of the primate mind, with emphases on apes (gorilla, chimpanzee), monkeys (particularly cebus and rhesus varieties) and human children. The goal is to evaluate the uniqueness of primate cognition, both human and nonhuman. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Biology 126 or Psychology 216 or instructor permission. 6 credits; SI, QRE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 372 Perceptual & Cognitive Expertise Some people are able to play (and win!) a dozen games of chess simultaneously or remember thousands of digits of pi. Most people can effortlessly recognize thousands of faces and easily discriminate between similar speech sounds. How do people develop these levels of expertise? This course will explore the processes underlying perceptual and cognitive expertise. Topics include the development of expertise in music perception and performance, memory, sports, visual processing, and taste perception. We will also discuss how attaining expertise in a given domain changes information processing. Prerequisite: Psychology 220 or Psychology/Cognitive Science 232 or permission of the instructor. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 374 Applying Cognitive Psychology to Education In this seminar we will we explore how findings from cognitive psychology can be used to improve education. The course will cover three main areas. First we will review research on learning and memory and the effectiveness of different student study strategies, such as highlighting, rereading, and quizzing yourself. Then we will explore some metacognitive aspects of learning--what students know about their own thinking--and how motivation affects performance in school. Finally, we will discuss some current issues in education (do learning styles exist? are standardized tests good for education?) and examine research exploring those issues. Students will be asked to evaluate basic research and consider how such research can be applied to educational contexts. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 required and a course in cognitive psychology is recommended. 6 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 375 Language and Deception In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. We will take up three main issues. The first is what it means to deceive and how people deceive others through language. What methods do they use, and how do these methods work? The second issue is why people deceive. What purposes do their deceptions serve in court, in advertising, in bureaucracies, in business transactions, and in everyday face-to-face conversation? The third issue is the ethics of deception. Is it legitimate to deceive others, and if so, when and why? Prerequisite: Psychology/Cognitive Science 232, 234, or 236. 6 credits; SI, QRE; Spring; M. Van Der Wege
PSYC 376 Neural Plasticity This seminar will examine how the brain changes in response to experience, with a focus on the mammalian brain. Examples will be drawn from the literature on "normal" development as well as from recent clinical research, both basic and applied. Prerequisite: Psychology 216. 6 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 378 Consciousness This seminar will center on contemporary theories of consciousness, exploring the topic from a variety of perspectives, including both psychological and biological ones. An examination of altered states of consciousness will also be an important part of this course, including hypnosis, meditation, coma, and out-of-body experiences, among others. We'll also consider unconscious processes and their relationship to conscious ones. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 379 Child and Adolescent Psychiatry This seminar will focus on the biological and psychological components of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. We will also address the possible causes of these disorders, and examine some current controversies surrounding diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 credits; NE; Fall; S. Kozberg, L. Wichlinski
PSYC 382 Topics in Social and Personality: Endings This seminar will examine the psychology of endings, including endings associated with psychotherapy, social interactions, personal relationships, social roles, literature and the arts, and life itself. We will address when and how endings occur, how we experience endings, and what makes an ending a good or poor one, among other issues. Prerequisite: Psychology 252, 256, 258, or instructor permission. 6 credits; SI; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 383 The Social Psychology of Gender: Playing by the "Gender" Rules Gender rules operate and occur in almost all aspects of social life. Thus, an analysis of gender can inform most aspects of social psychology. In this course, we will systematically review and analyze psychological theory and empirical research related to gender roles, gender stereotypes, and power differentials in society. We will discuss how and why social norms are related to gender and influence the experiences of men and women. Topics will include historical and theoretical perspectives on gender, differentiation of sex versus gender, gender similarities and differences, masculinity, sexism, feminism, body image, and media influence. We will also discuss gender issues important to contemporary society such as sexual orientation, transgender identities, and intersectionality approaches. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 required, Psychology 256 or 258 recommended. 6 credits; SI, WR2, QRE; Fall; S. Simon
PSYC 384 Psychology of Prejudice This seminar introduces students to major psychological theories and research on the development, perpetuation and reduction of prejudice. A social and historical approach to race, culture, ethnicity and race relations will provide a backdrop for examining psychological theory and research on prejudice formation and reduction. Major areas to be discussed are cognitive social learning, group conflict and contact hypothesis. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 256 or 258 recommended. 6 credits; SI, IDS; Winter; S. Akimoto
PSYC 388 Social Neuroscience This upper level seminar will explore how the brain functions in social contexts. We will examine how brain events bias social behavior and cognition, as well as how social behavior and cognition influence brain functioning. Course readings will emphasize the primary literature in the field. Prerequisite: Psychology 110 required, Psychology 216 and 256 or 258 recommended. 6 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 397 Biological and Behavioral Psychology This capstone seminar focuses on issues of interest to students planning to choose a comprehensive project in the areas of biological and behavioral psychology. The goals of the course are to review skills pertinent to scholarly investigation of topics within biological and behavioral psychology, introduce a variety of topics that are of current interest in the respective fields, mentor students in scientific proposal development and guide students in preparing the construction of comps projects. Prerequisite: Several 200-level Psychology courses. 3 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 398 Cognitive and Developmental Psychology This capstone seminar focuses on issues of interest to students planning to choose a comprehensive project in the areas of cognitive and developmental psychology. The goals of the course are to review skills pertinent to scholarly investigation of topics within cognitive and developmental psychology, introduce a variety of topics that are of current interest in the respective fields, mentor students in scientific proposal development and guide students in preparing the construction of comps projects. Prerequisite: Several 200-level Psychology courses. 3 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 399 Social, Personality, Clinical and Health Psychology This capstone seminar focuses on issues of interest to students planning to choose a comprehensive project in the areas of social, personality, clinical and health. The goals of the course are to review skills pertinent to scholarly investigation of topics within social, personality, clinical and health psychology, introduce a variety of topics that are of current interest in the respective fields, mentor students in scientific proposal development and guide students in preparing the construction of comps projects. Prerequisite: Several 200-level Psychology courses. 3 credits; NE; Not offered 2016-17
PSYC 400 Integrative Exercise Prerequisite: Psychology 397, 398, or 399. 1-6 credit; S/NC; Fall, Winter; J. Strand, K. Galotti, A. Putnam, S. Simon, L. Wichlinski, M. Van Der Wege, J. Neiworth, S. Meerts, N. Lutsky, S. Kozberg, S. Akimoto, K. Abrams

Other Courses Pertinent to Psychology

  • CGSC 232 Cognitive Processes
  • CGSC 236 Thinking, Reasoning, and Decision Making (not offered in 2016-17)
  • CGSC 380 Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development During the Preschool Years (not offered in 2016-17)
  • CGSC 386 Adolescent Cognitive Development: Developing an Identity and Life Plans (not offered in 2016-17)
  • MUSC 227 Perception and Cognition of Music