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Viewpoint

  • A safe space for free speech (Login Required)

    "As people of color who value our right to free expression, we are concerned with the school’s current and potential limitations on our rights. When we restrict our right to free speech, we are asserting that freedom is less important than not being offended; we have surrendered our rights to the bigots we abhor."

  • On the fray (Login Required)

    "If you happen to be alarmed about the erosion of our intellectual freedom and reason, I offer you this caveat to my favor: please take time to truly understand where your colleagues concerned with the effects of speech – especially hate speech – are coming from, on their terms. Understand their values – and find where they resonate."

  • Sure, I'll listen to you (Login Required)

    "By encouraging free speech, we are allowing people to say their opinions and hopefully be called out by society if they are being discriminatory. We should let others make us uncomfortable, and then challenge their viewpoints and make them uncomfortable right back."

  • Searching for a heroine (Login Required)

    "I see a trend in the heroines that I love, a trend that marks them from Cathy. While Cathy is self-indulgent and careless in her passions, Jo March, Lizzie Bennet, and Jane Eyre were not....We need even more heroines like Jo, Lizzie, and Jane. We need to read at a young age about women who are unapologetically themselves, who value love of all kinds (familial, friendship, romantic)."

  • The politics of Carleton's fossil fuel investments (Login Required)

    "Contrary to the Board’s position, there is no way to be politically unengaged or neutral in this situation. We cannot turn a blind eye to what these companies are doing. We are undermining the moral and intellectual integrity of the college by claiming to remain neutral."

  • Two things I learned from a Facebook war (Login Required)

    "It was just a microaggression, but what you are on the receiving end of is often years of frustration. Some people perceive this as the marginalized person being overly sensitive, or even inherently angry, which can lead to a further racist cycle associating people of color and marginalized groups with negative traits. How do you fix that?"

  • The question of motherhood (Login Required)

    "There was never a time when I wasn’t told that I was mature or that I would make a good mother. And while I do think that these traits are good and admirable, I have to wonder why I also, as I have grown up, have come to shy away from this label."

  • Warnings for safety, not sensitivity (Login Required)

    "We need to realize that content warnings are there to have discussions, but also to help healing and mental health."

  • The hypocrisy of "social liberalism" (Login Required)

    "If we begin to use comfort as the standard via which we determine what is “permissible” and what isn’t, then we’ve never really taken the principle of social openness seriously."

  • Pay for an opinion (Login Required)

    "In cases where angry alumni assert their right to have a voice in campus proceedings on forums like the somewhat infamous “Overheard at Carleton,” I wonder why are you using your alumni voice here?"

  • The neglected story of war (Login Required)

    "These unintended consequences are those which occur whenever you intervene in a conflict years in the making, from an outsider's perspective."

  • Dangerous assumptions detrimental to dialogue (Login Required)

    "In my view, the road to a freer and more just society doesn't begin with more self-limiting rules and regulations. Instead, it begins with giving ourselves over to the arduous, near sacred work of striving for empathy and compassion in our words and our actions."