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Columnists

  • Photo by Carleton alum featured in exhibit

    A photograph by Carleton alum Sebastian Meyer ’02 was recently in an exhibit at the Mpls Photo Center. Meyer’s photograph was among the 84 that were chosen for the exhibit which on display throughout the month of January.

  • Livin’ in the world today: Torn by the Holy Land

    There’s nothing that forces a person to understand the complexities of an issue more than having to argue both sides of a debate. Often we try to simplify problems into a binary choice – we’re either for or against something. This simplification, however, is rarely helpful. Usually, it just polarizes interested parties, distorts issues and prevents people from finding solutions.

  • What it means to me to be a good man: Three ideas

    What does goodness, within the context of manhood, mean to me? I offer three ways of thinking about the nexus of goodness and manhood. But, as a point of departure, I’ll state that for me, goodness is an aspiration and manhood is a process. Here goes.

  • Point-Counterpoint: Tim Tebow’s controversial Super Bowl ad

    Tebow should not participate in anti-abortion Super Bowl ad

    -By David Sacks

    Tebow deserves respect for his decision to speak out

    -By Justin Rotman

  • Livin' in the world today: Cognitive dissonance nation

    Upon the embarkation of President Obama’s second year, a request of our politicians: end the misinformation and start the education. It is time to call out the nation. Our country undoubtedly faces numerous colossal challenges, and in order to solve them, not only do we need legislative action but national behavioral change.

  • What it means to me to be a good man: A tribute to a single mother

    On a warm summer morning sixteen years ago, my father announced that he was leaving my mother, sister and me to go to the United States. It was not his departure that bothered my mother; but rather his lack of trust in her.

  • What it means to me to be a good man: Virtue, redemption, embodiment

    Is there something else, some other qualities that emerge when masculinity and ethics interact? I think so. Virtue is a matter of practice and the practice you get depends on the body you’re in.

  • Livin’ in the World Today

    If Democrats are going to have any chance of recovering, they need to start tuning into the public’s fears more effectively. Doing so will be the only way to immunize the population against Republicans’ hyperbolic characterizations of their reforms.

  • Livin’ in the World Today: Living Experiments

    I love experiments. To conduct an experiment one needs, among other traits, curiosity, creativity, patience and humility--curiosity to want to learn something; creativity to design the experiment; patience to handle errors and missteps; and most importantly, humility, because the willingness to run an experiment implicitly admits one’s inability to know outcomes with certainty, even when one’s expertise might be unparalleled.

  • What it means to me to be a good man: A reintroduction

    Much has been said of this essay series since it first began. Some have been critical of the series, questioning the wisdom of drawing attention to men’s issues when men in our society already receive the lion’s share of attention. Some have voiced misgivings that the series promotes gender binaries, deferring to male-normative and hetero-normative points of view. Many have praised the series as a forum capable of presenting a wide diversity of opinions.

  • Born in the USA: Tiger Woods: in a tight lie

    Who would have thought that a single car accident, where the driver backed out of his driveway onto a private road and struck a fire hydrant, would cause so much damage? Well, Tiger Woods found out how much damage a seemingly inconsequential event could have. In the week following this freakish accident, Tiger Woods went from being one of the most respected and admired people on this planet, viewed as almost a superhuman figure, to a severely flawed adulterer.

  • Born in the USA: Preventing the next Fort Hood

    Last week’s massacre at Fort Hood last week left 13 American soldiers dead and another 29 injured. What made the attack even more shocking was the fact that it occurred on American soil, where our soldiers should feel safe from war, and that another U.S. soldier committed this terrible crime. So what can we learn from this attack and bring with us into the future as the U.S. continues to fight terrorism around the world?