Skip Navigation

Viewpoint

  • Emil Dominick Constantino

    Constantino: Rethinking Nihilism

    Carleton is fond of touting itself as an exceptionally welcoming community, tolerant of all intellectual bents and persuasions. However, although I have attempted to have meaningful discussions, my philosophical convictions have been met with cool and scornful rejection. In short, there is little room at Carleton for a nihilist.

  • Aaron Carter

    The music of sports

    From Aaron Carter to Jay-Z, Simon and Garfunkel to the 1985 Chicago Bears, music and sports have been inextricably linked for as long as I can remember. Many musicians can’t resist name-dropping the hottest athletes of the moment, and who could blame them?

  • Truly independent student radio: KRLX rejects Clear Channel offer

    Over this past winter break, Clear Channel Communications, Inc. asked KRLX to join their iHeartRadio Internet streaming service. However, it is both financially unnecessary and directly opposed to KRLX’s history and character to relinquish our autonomy.

  • Carleton alum trumpets benefits of AmeriCorps programs

    Consider the Minnesota Reading Corps or Math Corps. They are AmeriCorps programs, and meaningful career experiences with which you can make a difference. I know this, because it’s what I do, but I also have proof.

  • Thinking Man

    Differences of opinion

    One of the things that we are quite good at, as human beings, is to seek out and hold on tightly to differences. We crave a clear identity for ourselves, not to mention one that we approve of, and one quick way to add texture to our own self-concept is to make assumptions about other people. But there are different ways of dealing with difference.

  • Isaac Hodes

    CSA President Isaac Hodes: On the need for remuneration for CSA officers

    We have historically had very few people running in elections to be officers; in recent years, no more than two people have competed for a given position. My concern is that we are missing out on capable and interested people who must work ten hours a week as part of their financial aid package.

  • community service

    Community service at Carleton: Let’s be better

    Ask Average Carl when the last time he went to a football game was and he’ll probably tell you never, although he may know our starting tight end from organic chemistry. We are the Division III to the core. Even our most outstanding performers are student-athletes.

  • mlk

    Reflections on Martin Luther King's legacy

    Closing one of his sermons, the good reverend spoke “if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice.  Say that I was a drum major for peace."

  • laird carleton college

    An apology from the Humanities Center

    We attended Tuesday night’s talk by Lori Pappas of the Global Team for Local Initiatives (GTLI) knowing that we would hear about important work that this NGO has been doing with public health and education with the Hamer in Southwest Ethiopia. 

  • Food

    Food Truth: Re-imaging our food systems

    Food Truth is a group of students that likes, eats and talks about food and its many relationships. We have a group on campus for about 5 years now and have had varied focuses over the years -   making cookbooks, getting fair trade bananas on campus, having bomb potlucks and parties, hosting discussions, visiting farms, trying to tap Carleton’s sugar maples.

  • Damnant Quod Non Intelligunt: In response to Rush Limbaugh’s “sad-sack story of a classical studies scholar”

    In a November 1st rant about the Occupy Wall Street movement, radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh singled out Classical Studies as a worthless and unemployable pursuit.  His ridicule of students who pursue the Classics is grounded on nothing but an ignorance of the field and the liberal arts philosophy as a whole.

  • A response to Griffin Johnson: On the practicality of humanistic inquiry and of a liberal arts education

    A few weeks ago there was a viewpoint article that discussed the impracticality of both a liberal education and, more narrowly, of a major in the humanities, social sciences, and certain “quixotic” intellectual pursuits. For anyone who may have been saddened, angered, or dismayed by this, let me offer a few factual counterpoints in support of the merits of a liberal arts degree.