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  • Big Freedia performed at The Cave.

    Photo feature: Big Freedia

    The self-proclaimed “Queen Diva” of Bounce Music came to Carleton last week, giving a talk as well as performing at The Cave.

  • An artist's rendering of a pulsar.

    Andrea Lommen ‘91 notices a wrinkle in the cosmos

    Creases in the fabric of space-time. Though the notion seems to forbode some daunting task involving abstract phenomena, the theory is not so remote. On Thurs., Oct. 14, Carleton alumnus and astrophysicist Andrea Lommen ‘91 presented a lecture regarding the modern employment of pulsars in detecting “folds” in gravitational waves.

  • Professor Fred Hagstrom

    Hagstrom presents on story of Frank Shigemura

    This past Wednesday, Professor Fred Hagstrom gave a presentation entitled “From Minidoka to Minnesota” about the story of Frank Shigemura, a Japanese-American who came to Carleton from an internment camp during World War II as part of a scholarship created to help remove students from internment camps.

  • Karen Tei Yamashita

    Carleton alum finalist for 2010 National Book Award

    Karen Tei Yamashita '73 has been named a finalist for the 2010 National Book Award for the novel I Hotel, Yamashita’s fifth book. The book is about struggles for civil rights set in San Francisco’s Chinatown from 1968-1977.

  • Flood causes $3.2 million in damage

    Sediment on West FieldNow that the waters have fully receded back into the Cannon River, Carleton has begun to address the extent of damage to the college and begun to replace and repair ruined items. According to an email sent out to Carleton staff, faculty, and students on October 8, the current damage estimate rests at $3.2 million, most of which should be insured.

  • Ben Katchor

    Graphic Artist Katchor presents comic on cafeterias

    Aboard the musty 15-minute Chicago train ride he took each day, Ben Katchor needed to find a way to channel his boredom. Observing the beauty in the blur of buildings that passed through the window, he was inspired to begin working on comic strips.

  • Cafeteria tray

    Trayless Tuesdays coming to LDC

    As you walk into the LDC next Tuesday, be prepared to make a few changes in your eating habits. The food will be the same, but the trays will be gone. With the leadership of the Sustainability Assistants (STAs) and the support of more than 570 Carleton students, the CSA passed a resolution to eliminate trays from the East Dining Hall (LDC) on Tuesdays.

  • Besides his performance and lecture, Bassam Saba also attended and gave shorter lectures to classes on Friday, including Maureen Jackson's Turkey Today class.

    Arabic musician, Basam Saba, delivers concert

    On the night of October 7th, the Great Hall was filled with a unique blend of improvisational music. Finding inspiration in the roots of traditional Arab harmonies, Bassam Saba and his ensemble let their emotions conduct them in a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

  • Bon Appetit logo

    Bon Appetit Fellows present “Stories from the Fields,” explain farming industry

    Last Tuesday, two Fellows from the Bon Appétit Management Company Foundation gave a presentation titled “Stories from the Field”, which covered Carleton’s food service’s methodology, farm workers’ rights, how Bon Appétit tries to provide sustainable food for its patrons, and American farmers’ working conditions.

  • Sandra Cisneros delivers the Convocation.

    Cisneros delivers convo in pajamas

    Award-winning American author Sandra Cisneros, famous for her acclaimed first novel The House on Mango Street – which she wrote just out of undergraduate studies – enthusiastically delivered a convocation speech about writing, death, and spiritual health, all while wearing her brand new blue pajamas.

  • Rea Dol, the founder of the SOPUDEP school in Port-au-Prince. Dol gave her presentation on her experience after the earthquake.

    Founder of Haiti school discusses rebuilding

    On Oct. 5, native Haitians Max Adrien and Rea Dol came to Carleton to speak about their roles in mitigating the aftermath of the earthquake that struck Haiti approximately ten months ago.

  • B-boys descend on Carleton for battle

    B-boy GravityThe October 1 b-boy battle began simply enough. Individuals from the Dynamic Rockers b-boy group and other local Minnesota crews began to warm up on the “floor” as the crowds trickled in, crews stretched in back and people chatted casually. Suddenly, the music grew more upbeat and the warm-up became more serious. What began with some light footwork soon turned into dives down onto the floor, twists and strange contortions of the body, freezes in positions that didn’t seem possible, and flips that made the crowd cry out with excitement.