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Political Science (POSC)

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Political science encompasses the study of governments and international organizations, political behavior, public policies, political processes, systems, and theory. It includes American politics, comparative politics, political philosophy, international relations and world politics. The department's curriculum is designed to cultivate judicious and productive citizenship, as well as provide versatile skills and knowledge. These can be applied to a wide range of fields, including law, business, government, international service, education, journalism, and other fields.

Majors choose between two tracks: Political Science or Political Science/International Relations. Within each of these tracks, students have flexibility to plan their courses of study around subfields of interest.

Requirements for the Political Science track

Sixty-six credits, including:

1. Core Courses (18 credits) Majors are required to complete three of the following core courses prior to their senior year.

POSC 120 Comparative Political Regimes

POSC 122 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

POSC 160 Political Philosophy

POSC 170 International Relations and World Politics

2. Methods Sequence (12 credits):

MATH 115 Introduction to Statistics, MATH 215 Introduction to Probability and Statistics, MATH 245 Applied Regression Analysis, MATH 275 Introduction to Statistical inference (6 credits) or MATH Stats AP score of 4 or 5. Math courses may be taken on an elective S/CR/NC basis.

POSC 230: Methods of Political Research (6 credits) This course should be taken as soon as possible after declaring a major, but not simultaneously with the math class listed above.

3. Elective Courses (30 credits in the department): At least two courses (12 credits) must be at the 300-level, and one of these two must be an asterisk * designated seminar. It is recommended that majors take their seminar course during the junior year.

A maximum of 12 credits earned on a non-Carleton off campus studies program may be granted toward the electives requirement. These credits may not be used to replace a core course and should be distinct and independent from electives offered at Carleton. The chair may require a copy of the off-campus course syllabus.

4. Integrative Exercise (6 credits total - POSC 400): During their junior or senior year students will revise substantially the final paper from an advanced seminar in political science. (Department-approved courses are designated with an asterisk (*). Also see separately published list, which does not include courses taken on non-Carleton off-campus programs.)

The professor in the course will act as the student's comps adviser. Usually revision will take place during the term following the seminar and the revision will be completed during that term. However, professors and advisees may mutually define the scope of revision. The integrative exercise will be completed with preparation of a poster for a group poster presentation.

Requirements for the Political Science/International Relations track

Coordinator: Associate Professor Devashree Gupta

The International Relations Program was originated in 1937 by the former Secretary of State and Nobel Peace Prize winner, Frank B. Kellogg, through the establishment at Carleton of the Kellogg Foundation for Education in International Relations.

Sixty-six credits, including:

1. Core Courses (12 credits): Majors are required to complete the two core courses prior to their senior year, as listed below.

Required:

POSC 170 International Relations and World Politics

Plus one of the following:

POSC 120 Comparative Political Regimes

POSC 122 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

POSC 160 Political Philosophy

2. Methods Sequence (12 credits):

MATH 115 Introduction to Statistics or MATH 215 Introduction to Probability and Statistics, MATH 245 Applied Regression Analysis, MATH 275 Introduction to Statistical Inference (6 credits) or MATH Stats AP score of 4 or 5. Math courses may be taken on an elective S/CR/NC basis.

POSC 230 Methods of Political Research (6 credits) This course should be taken as soon as possible after declaring a major, but not simultaneously with the Math class listed above.

3. Elective Courses (36 credits): Six courses from the following four subfields of electives, and area studies, subject to the following distribution requirements. (May not be taken as S/Cr/NC). (Class of 2015: Please refer to previous catalog and electives list on department website.)

a) three of these six courses (or 18 credits) must come from the student's main subfield electives list and one (6 credits) from another subfield list.

b) One of the six courses must be a non-POSC selection. (May not be taken as S/CR/NC)

c) One of the six courses must be an area studies course (If a non-POSC course, it will also satisfy the (b) requirement.) Approved area studies courses are listed below. Area studies cannot be used as a main subfield.

d) Two of the six courses must be 300-level courses in the Political Science Department, and one of those two 300-level courses must be an asterisk * designated seminar in the student's main subfield.

It is recommended that majors take their seminar course during the junior year. A course which was listed as fulfilling the International Relations electives requirement at the time the student elected that course, but which has been deleted from the catalog simply because it has not been taught this year or last, will continue to be accepted in fulfillment of the IR requirement.

a) Leadership, Peace and Security

HIST 281 War in Modern Africa

HIST 347 The Global Cold War (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 395 The Global Cold War

POSC 208 The American Presidency

POSC 226 Political Psychology (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 231 American Foreign Policy

POSC 232 Chinese Foreign Policy

POSC 236 Global, National and Human Security

POSC 239 The Diplomat's Craft: Three Case Studies (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 240 On America and Its Wars (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 241 Ethnic Conflict

POSC 248 The U.S.-China Relationship

POSC 267 Comparative Foreign Policy (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 274 Political Psychology of Presidential Foreign Policy Decision Making

POSC 278 Memory and Politics

POSC 285 The U.S. Intelligence Community (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 286 A Comparative Study of the Vietnam and Iraqi Wars

POSC 288 Washington D.C.: A Global Conversation Part I (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 289 Washington D.C. Seminar: A Global Conversation Part II (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 293 Washington D.C. Seminar: Global Conservation Internship (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 328 Foreign Policy Analysis* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 330 The Complexity of Politics*

RELG 265 Religion and Violence: Hindus, Muslims, Jews (not offered in 2014-2015)

SOAN 236 Introduction to Peace Studies (not offered in 2014-2015)

WGST 240 Gender, Globalization and War

b) Globalization, Development and Sustainability

AMST 396 Gated Communities and Slums: Globalizing the American City

ECON 240 Microeconomics of Development

ECON 271 Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment

ECON 274 Labor Economics

ECON 275 Law and Economics

ECON 280 International Trade

ECON 281 International Finance

ENTS 310 Topics in Environmental Law and Policy (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 262 Public Health: History, Policy, and Practice (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 211 Environment and the Evolution of Rules: Designing Institutions to Solve Political Problems

POSC 212 Environmental Justice

POSC 222 The Politics of Food: Producers, Consumers and Citizenship (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 238 Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 263 European Political Economy (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 265 Capitalist Crises, Power, and Policy

POSC 266 Urban Political Economy

POSC 268 Global Environmental Politics and Policy

POSC 333 Global Social Changes and Sustainability* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 334 Global Public Health*

POSC 338 Politics of Inequality and Poverty* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 361 Approaches to Development*

POSC 364 Capitalism and Its Critics* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 365 Political Economy of Global Tourism* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 366 Urban Political Economy*

POSC 379 Political Econ & Ecology of S.E. Asia: Diversity of Social Ecological Systems in Southeast Asia

SOAN 234 Ecology, Economy, and Culture (not offered in 2014-2015)

c) Democracy, Society, and the State

EUST 159 "The Age of Isms" - Ideals, Ideas and Ideologies in Modern Europe

HIST 271 Political Violence and Human Rights in Latin America (not offered in 2014-2015)

LTAM 370 Brazil Culture and Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 201 National Policymaking (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 202 Parties, Interest Groups and Elections (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 203 Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 205 Issues in American Democracy (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 207 Urban Politics in a Global Era

POSC 209 Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 218 Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States

POSC 219 Protest, Power & Grassroots Organizing: American Social Movements (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 221 Latin American Politics

POSC 237 Southeast Asian Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 244 The Politics of the Celtic Fringe (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 245 Contemporary Politics of the Middle East (1918-1967)

POSC 247 Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Comparative Nationalism (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 264 Politics of Contemporary China (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 281 Global Society: An Approach to World Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 283 Separatist Movements

POSC 303 Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 320 Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Middle East*

POSC 322 Neoliberalism and the New Left in Latin America* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 332 Religion and Politics*

POSC 337 Political Economy of Happiness*

POSC 348 Strangers, Foreigners and Exiles* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 358 Comparative Social Movements* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 359 Cosmopolitanism*

POSC 378 Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Social Changes in Southeast Asia

POSC 383 Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Politics of the European Union (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 392 Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Field Research Experiences and Methods

RELG 264 Islamic Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

SOAN 219 Nations and Nationalism (not offered in 2014-2015)

SOAN 225 Social Movements

SOAN 283 Immigration and Immigrants in Europe and the United States

d) Philosophical and Legal Inquiries

POSC 223 Food Justice (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 228 Foucault: Bodies in Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 250 Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic

POSC 251 Modern Political Philosophy: Modernity and Its Discontents (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 252 Herodotus and the Origin of Political Philosophy (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 253 Marxist Political Thought (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 254 Freedom, Excellence, Happiness: Aristotle's Ethics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 255 Post-Modern Political Thought

POSC 256 Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil

POSC 258 Politics and Ambition

POSC 259 Justice Among Nations (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 261 Power, Freedom, and Resistance. (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 269 Issues in Postmodern Political Thought (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 271 Constitutional Law I

POSC 272 Constitutional Law II (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 276 Arendt: Imagination and Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 282 Terrorism and Violence in World Politics

POSC 282 Humanitarian Intervention and International Law

POSC 313 Legal Issues in Higher Education (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 350 Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic*

POSC 350 Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil*

POSC 351 Political Theory of Martin Luther King, Jr. (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 352 Political Theory of Alexis de Tocqueville* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 355 Identity, Culture and Rights* (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 371 Modern Political Philosophy: Modernity and Its Discontents* (not offered in 2014-2015)

WGST 234 Feminist Theory (not offered in 2014-2015)

Approved Area Studies Courses

AMST 230 The American Sublime: Landscape, Character & National Destiny in Nineteenth Century America (not offered in 2014-2015)

ECON 233 European Economic History

EUST 100 Allies or Enemies? America through European Eyes

EUST 110 The Nation State in Europe

HIST 138 Crusades, Mission, and the Expansion of Europe (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 139 Foundations of Modern Europe

HIST 140 The Age of Revolutions: Modern Europe, 1789-1914 (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 141 Europe in the Twentieth Century

HIST 151 History of Modern Japan

HIST 152 Imperial China (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 153 History of Modern China (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 156 History of Modern Korea (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 158 Cold War in East Asia

HIST 161 History of Modern India, c. 1700-1047 (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 165 From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 167 History of Modern South Asia 1947-Onward (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 170 Modern Latin America 1810-Present (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 181 West Africa in the Era of the Slave Trade

HIST 182 Living in the Colonial Context: Africa, 1850-1950 (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 183 History of Early West Africa

HIST 184 Colonial West Africa (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 240 Imperial Russia (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 241 Russia through Wars and Revolutions (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 242 Communism, Cold War, Collapse: Russia Since Stalin

HIST 243 The Peasants are Revolting! Society and Politics in the Making of Modern France

HIST 249 Two Centuries of Tumult: Modern Central Europe (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 250 Modern Germany (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 254 Colonialism in East Asia (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 255 Rumors, Gossip, and News in East Asia

HIST 256 History of Urban China (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 257 Urban History in Beijing and Beyond Program: History of Urban China and Korea (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 258 Cold War in East Asia (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 260 The Making of the Modern Middle East

HIST 262 Public Health: History, Policy, and Practice (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 265 Central Asia in the Modern Age (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 272 The Mexican Revolution: History, Myth and Art

HIST 276 The African Diaspora in Latin America (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 278 The Spanish Inquisition (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 280 African in the Arab World

HIST 281 War in Modern Africa

HIST 286 Africans in the Arab World: On Site and Revisited (not offered in 2014-2015)

HIST 360 Muslims and Modernity

LTAM 300 Issues in Latin American Studies (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 122 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

POSC 221 Latin American Politics

POSC 232 Chinese Foreign Policy

POSC 237 Southeast Asian Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

POSC 264 Politics of Contemporary China (not offered in 2014-2015)

RELG 150 Religions of South Asia

RELG 152 Religions in Japanese Culture

RELG 255 Social Engagement in Asian Religions (not offered in 2014-2015)

RELG 262 Islamic Africa (not offered in 2014-2015)

RELG 264 Islamic Politics (not offered in 2014-2015)

RUSS 150 Facts and Fairy Tales: Introduction to Russian Cultural History (not offered in 2014-2015)

SOAN 157 Culture and Politics in India (not offered in 2014-2015)

SOAN 252 Middle East: History and Society in Comparative Perspectives (not offered in 2014-2015)

SOAN 256 Transformations in African Ethnography

SOAN 257 Culture and Politics in India (not offered in 2014-2015)

4. Integrative Exercise (Total of 6 credits - POSC 400): During their junior or senior year, students will revise substantially the final paper from an advanced seminar in international relations. (Department-approved courses are designated with an asterisk (*). Also see separately published list, which does not include courses taken on non-Carleton off-campus programs.)

The professor in the course will act as the student's comps adviser. Usually revision will take place during the term following the seminar and the revision will be completed during that term. However, professors and advisees may mutually define the scope of revision. The integrative exercise will be completed with preparation of a poster for a group poster presentation.

5. Study Abroad: We recommend study in a Carleton College Off-Campus or non-Carleton program that includes a significant political component.

A maximum of 12 credits earned on a non-Carleton off campus studies program may be granted toward the electives requirement. These credits may not be used to replace a core course and should be distinct and independent from electives offered at Carleton. The chair may require a copy of the off-campus course syllabus.

Political Science and International Relations Courses

POSC 100. American Elections of 2014 How can we understand the campaigns and results of the 2014 American elections? This course examines (1) the electoral role of parties, candidates and interest groups (2) prior "midterm" elections in U.S. history and (3) voting trends and policy results from the 2008, 2010 and 2012 elections. Students will perform post-election analysis of 2014 U.S. House, Senate, state gubernatorial and state legislative elections by examining exit polls and election results. These oral reports will serve as the basis for the final examination.  6 cr., AI, WR1, FallS. Schier

POSC 120. Comparative Political Regimes An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared. 6 cr., SI, IS, Fall,Winter,SpringD. Gupta, K. Freeze, A. Montero

POSC 122. Politics in America: Liberty and Equality An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 cr., SI, IDS, QRE, Fall,Winter,SpringR. Keiser, S. Schier

POSC 160. Political Philosophy Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 cr., HI, Fall,SpringL. Cooper, M. Czobor-Lupp

POSC 170. International Relations and World Politics A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development. 6 cr., SI, IS, Fall,Winter,SpringT. Myint, H. Bou Nassif

POSC 201. National Policymaking We will explore factors that influence public policy in the U.S., beginning with the politics of the policy formation process, including nongovernmental actors (corporations, media, nonprofit organizations, citizens, interest groups), and major governmental institutions. We will discuss fundamental American political concepts such as liberty, power, and democracy, and the role of citizens. Our goals are to increase understanding of the wide array of political factors that determine the feasibility and/or desirability of a particular course of action in response to a perceived problem, and to evaluate the status of various kinds of knowledge claims, including sources of credibility. Prerequisite: Political Science 122 or sophomore standing. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 202. Parties, Interest Groups and Elections Examination of the American electoral system and its components: parties, interest groups and the media. The impact of parties and interests on national policy making is also explored. The course will devote special attention to the 2008 and 2010 elections. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 203. Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion Cross-listed with POSC 303. How does political advertising influence the electorate? Do "negative ads" turn voters off? Can advertising be used strategically to influence turnout, decreasing the participation of one of the major parties, while increasing the likelihood that others will vote? Election ads along with the six second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. The course includes a research experience. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 204. Media and Electoral Politics: 2010 United States Election Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news using our multi-year data set of content analyzed election ads and news. We study a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods to learn how political communication affects U.S. elections. 6 cr., SI, QRE, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 205. Issues in American Democracy Cross-listed with POSC 305. Is direct citizen rule through participatory democracy or a reliance on policymaking by officeholders the best way to govern America? This seminar addresses the question by examining several topics--the levels of political knowledge and interest among the public, the impact of interest groups in national government, and the operation of popular rule through initiatives and referendums in American states. 6 cr., SI, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 206. The American Courts We will explore the political and institutional dimensions of courts, and consider whether and how judicial decision making differs from political decision making. Topics will include legal reasoning and the role of the judge, the institutional capacity of courts and their relation to the political branches, and the role of lawyers in the political system. 6 cr., SI, WR2, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 207. Urban Politics in a Global Era Are cities microcosms of state or nation? How has the role of immigrant-port-of-entry affected the politics of cities? What has been the impact of population shift to the suburbs? Are African-Americans and Latinos fighting over an inconsequential hole-in-the-doughnut in Chicago and Los Angeles? What is the significance of living wage and gay rights movements in cities? Why do European and American cities seem so different, and are there signs of convergence in the era of globalization?  6 cr., SI, IS, FallR. Keiser

POSC 208. The American Presidency A study of the contemporary presidency, with a focus on the development of the institutional presidency, presidential personality, and the presidency's relations with other institutions in the American and international political systems. Particular attention will be devoted to the presidencies of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Offered in alternate years. SpringS. Schier

POSC 209. Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization Citizen mobilization often centers around environmental problems or other controversies about the shape of community landscapes. We will explore concepts of democracy, power, identity, and sense of place as we examine cases of citizen mobilization. The class will research a current case study of an environmental controversy that gave rise to citizen mobilization. When and why do people in a community mobilize? What are the obstacles to community-based political action? How do local communities mobilize to meet the challenge of broader issues, such as climate change? Are the Occupy protests similar to community-based mobilization? 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 211. Environment and the Evolution of Rules: Designing Institutions to Solve Political Problems How can we design democratic institutions to deal with environmental and social problems? Are there universal approaches to solving political problems in physically and socially diverse communities? Do people come up with different institutional ways to address shared problems because of environmental or cultural differences? By examining basic principles of institutional design you will learn how to analyze constitutions, public policies, international treaties, and other "rule ordered relationships" that different people have created to deal with environmental concerns and, generally, the health and welfare of their communities. 6 cr., SI, WinterB. Allen

POSC 212. Environmental Justice The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries. 6 cr., SI, IDS, QRE, WinterK. Smith

POSC 218. Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods? Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IDS, QRE, Offered in alternate years. SpringR. Keiser

POSC 219. Protest, Power & Grassroots Organizing: American Social Movements Why do protest movements form and who joins? How do grassroots movements achieve their aims? This class examines the strategies of grassroots political actors as they organize protest movements in civil society, forge coalitions, and give a voice to the voiceless. Comparisons are drawn between the United States, European, Asian, and Latin American experiences. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 221. Latin American Politics Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in selected Latin American countries. Attention is focused on general problems and patterns of development, with some emphasis on U.S.-Latin American relations. 6 cr., SI, IS, Offered in alternate years. WinterA. Montero

POSC 222. The Politics of Food: Producers, Consumers and Citizenship Although what we eat everyday is familiar and biologically intimate, it is also a part of a complex political system. In this course we will learn about and reflect upon the political aspects of food in the U.S. Topics include food history, agribusiness, local food movements, food policy, and social justice. What influences the way we eat? How did ignorance about food become the norm in the U.S.? The course will include guest speakers and possibly field trips. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 223. Food Justice Systems for growing, processing and distributing food have been subject to claims that they are unjust, yet problems persist. This course will examine concepts of justice and apply them to issues related to farmworkers, factory works and others who produce our food, poverty and access to food, and genetically modified organisms as they relate to control of production. We will ask how justice relates to sustainability. Although the course will focus on the United States, global issues such as immigration and food sovereignty will be included. Students will have the opportunity to explore food justice issues in other countries. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 226. Political Psychology This course is an introduction to political psychology, an inter-disciplinary field of study that applies psychological theory and research to the study of politics, as a theoretical alternative to rational choice models. Study will include applying psychological models to elite decision making and to political behavior of ordinary citizens. Topics include personality and political leadership, group processes and foreign policy, theories of information processing and elite decision making, malignant political aggression and punitive politics, altruism and heroic political action, etc. in light of important political issues and events. 6 cr., SI, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 228. Foucault: Bodies in Politics Are human bodies the sites where political power is constituted and legitimized? Are they sites of resistance and change, through which the construction of alternative identities and forms of discourse is incited and made possible? Drawing on philosophical, historical, and literary resources this course will explore different ways in which human bodies become politically significant. While the course will take its leading idea from Foucault's notion of biopolitics, it will expand its approach in a direction that will include feminist perspectives, as well as prison memories from survivors and witnesses of totalitarian/authoritarian political regimes. 6 cr., HI, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 230. Methods of Political Research An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisite: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 cr., SI, WR2, QRE, Fall,Winter,SpringG. Marfleet, K. Freeze

POSC 231. American Foreign Policy An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy. Prerequisite: Political Science 122 highly recommended. 6 cr., SI, WinterS. Schier

POSC 232. Chinese Foreign Policy The "Rise of China" over the past 35 years presents challenges and opportunities for the United States and other countries around the world. This course examines China's growing and changing influence in the world.  The course starts by exploring historical Chinese foreign policy, from Imperial China through the Cold War. The course then examines a variety of different theories and factors explaining the general nature of China's foreign policy. The course concludes by detailing China's current bilateral relationships with specific countries and regions around the world. 6 cr., SI, IS, SpringK. Freeze

POSC 236. Global, National and Human Security What are the greatest threats to national and global security? In this course we will explore a range of traditional security topics including: the proliferation of WMDs, terrorism, piracy, insurgencies, arms races, territorial disputes and strategic rivalries. In addition to these classic concerns, we also consider newer ones such as cyber-security, the threat of global pandemics, unmanned warfare and the impact of climate change. Our study begins and concludes with the debate over the concept of security in the twenty-first century. 6 cr., SI, IS, SpringG. Marfleet

POSC 237. Southeast Asian Politics This course will cover key thematic issues of Southeast Asian politics, including the challenges of democracy, regional integration, environmental politics, the rise of the power of non-state actors, and struggles for citizen-sovereignty of the people. We will examine these frontier issues against the background of Southeast Asia's societal evolution through kingdoms, colonial eras, emergence of nation-states, and the influence of globalization on politics. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 238. Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 239. The Diplomat's Craft: Three Case Studies Diplomacy is the means by which states find common ground and resolve differences. Former ambassador Burt Levin uses three cases studies from his career to evaluate the relationships between diplomacy and policy implementation. 3 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 240. On America and Its Wars From a nation which prided itself on remaining aloof from the intrigues and struggles of foreign powers, the United States over the past century has become regularly involved in a series of major and limited wars. The course will examine a number of these conflicts and the debates that surrounded them in the hope of discerning the influence they may have on America's ongoing role and behavior in the international arena. 3 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 241. Ethnic Conflict Ethnic conflict is a persistent and troubling challenge for those interested in preserving international peace and stability. By one account, ethnic violence has claimed more than ten million lives since 1945, and in the 1990s, ethnic conflicts comprised nearly half of all ongoing conflicts around the world. In this course, we will attempt to understand the conditions that contribute to ethnic tensions, identify the triggers that lead to escalation, and evaluate alternative ideas for managing and solving such disputes. The course will draw on a number of cases, including Rwanda, Bosnia, and Northern Ireland. 6 cr., SI, IS, FallD. Gupta

POSC 244. The Politics of the Celtic Fringe This class will examine recent political, economic and social transformations that have occurred in the so-called Celtic Fringe: Scotland, Ireland, Cornwall, Wales and Galicia. We will use these regions, which have long occupied marginal positions within much larger and more powerful states, as cases to explore a variety of issues, including center-periphery relations, migration, internal colonialism, autonomous and separatist movements, and regionalism in the context of the European Union. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 245. Contemporary Politics of the Middle East (1918-1967) This course covers the colonial and early post-colonial period of Middle East history and politics. When the Ottoman Empire collapsed in 1918, France and Britain redrew the map of the region drastically, and new states such as Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon were carved out of old Ottoman provinces. Since this formative period the quest for stability in the Middle East has proved elusive. Many ills still plaguing the region today find their roots in the dynamics of the era under study. The main goal of the course is to explore the historical origins of current Middle East politics. 6 cr., SI, IS, WinterH. Bou Nassif

POSC 247. Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Comparative Nationalism This class uses the experiences of different European countries as a lens to examine the role of nationalism in contemporary politics, particularly how societies construct national identities and who does (and does not) belong to that national community. In the classroom portion of this seminar, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of nationalism as well as some of its contemporary manifestations. We will also examine the activities of European separatist movements, including the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence from the UK. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 248. The U.S.-China Relationship This course will examine the interaction between China and America from the inception in the late eighteenth century to the present, with greater emphasis on more recent events. The focus will be on evaluating the underlying and persisting factors which have made Sino-U.S. relations so special and difficult. 3 cr., SI, IS, FallB. Levin

POSC 250. Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic Cross-listed with POSC 350. In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book. 6 cr., HI, FallL. Cooper

POSC 251. Modern Political Philosophy: Modernity and Its Discontents Cross-listed with POSC 371. The philosophers who launched the modern age thought that humanity could achieve security and prosperity if people's concerns were directed away from transcendent longings (which often resulted in fanaticism and conflict) toward lower and more attainable ends. That project has borne impressive fruit. But it has also, almost from the beginning, stirred a restless discontent that has sometimes erupted in the form of utopian ideologies and totalitarian horrors. In this course we will study both those who helped launch the modern project (Hobbes, Spinoza, and/or Locke) and its most powerful critics (Rousseau, Nietzsche). 6 cr., HI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 252. Herodotus and the Origin of Political Philosophy This course will be devoted to close study of Herodotus' Histories, a rich and delightful book that defies easy description. Herodotus has much to teach us about great questions of freedom and despotism, war and peace, and empire. He was also arguably the first great thinker to explore cultural diversity and the larger questions it raises, including questions of particularism versus universalism and nature versus convention. Students will write three 7-8 page papers and give informal class presentations. 6 cr., HI, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 253. Marxist Political Thought This discussion seminar introduces key texts of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels as well as the writings of Marxists since Marx's death, such as Lenin, Gramsci, Bernstein and others. The course will address concepts in their writings such as alienation, historical materialism, class, the state, science and ideology, socialism and social democracy. While a lot of attention is paid to Marxist theory, we will also consider the political contexts in which theories and debates emerged and their implications for political practice. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 254. Freedom, Excellence, Happiness: Aristotle's Ethics What does it mean to be morally excellent? To be politically excellent? To be intellectually and spiritually excellent? Are these things mutually compatible? Do they lie within the reach of everyone? And what is the relation between excellence and pleasure? Between excellence and happiness? Aristotle addresses these questions in intricate and illuminating detail in the Nicomachean Ethics, which we will study in this course. The Ethics is more accessible than some of Aristotle's other works. But it is also a multifaceted and multi-layered book, and one that reveals more to those who study it with care. 6 cr., SI, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 255. Post-Modern Political Thought The thought and practice of the modern age have been found irredeemably oppressive, alienating, dehumanizing, and/or exhausted by a number of leading philosophic thinkers in recent years. In this course we will explore the critiques and alternative visions offered by a variety of post-modern thinkers, including Nietzsche (in many ways the first post-modern), Heidegger, Foucault, and Derrida. 6 cr., HI, SpringM. Czobor-Lupp

POSC 256. Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil Crosslisted with POSC 350 Nietzsche understood himself to be living at a moment of great endings: the exhaustion of modernity, the self-undermining of rationalism, the self-overcoming of morality--in short, and most stunningly, the "death of God." Nietzsche both foresaw and tried to accelerate these endings. But he also tried to bring about a new beginning, a culture that he believed would be life-affirming and life-enhancing. In this course we will engage in a close study of Beyond Good and Evil, perhaps Nietzsche's most beautiful book and probably his most political one. Selections from some of his other books will also be assigned. 6 cr., HI, WinterL. Cooper

POSC 258. Politics and Ambition Is personal ambition a threat to peace and the public good or is it a prod to nobility and heroism? Does it exemplify the opposition between self and society or does it represent their intersection and mutual support­--or both? Drawing on literary, philosophical, and historical works this course will take up these and other questions as part of a broad examination of the role of ambition in politics.  6 cr., HI, SpringL. Cooper

POSC 259. Justice Among Nations This course will attempt to bring to bear great works of political philosophy on the central questions of international relations, questions concerning both the moral basis of power and the character of international politics. Readings will be drawn from ancient and modern political philosophy and will culminate in an analysis and evaluation of contemporary international relations theory in light of these earlier thinkers. 6 cr., SI, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 261. Power, Freedom, and Resistance. This course will explore different ways in which Foucault sees power, not as domination and violence, but as necessarily connected to freedom, courage, and a culture of self-criticism. It will also explore Arendt's conception of freedom as being intrinsic to the human condition and her conception of power as form of concerted action, of solidarity. The main aim of the course will be to bring these two thinkers in dialogue with each other in ways that highlight that power requires freedom, while freedom has no reality in the absence of the actual capacities of the political subjects for free action. 6 cr., HI, IS, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 263. European Political Economy An introduction to the politics of the European region during the post-World War II period. Students will examine the political conditions that gave impetus to the creation, maintenance, crisis, and decline of Keynesian economic policies, social welfare states, social democratic partisan alliances, and cooperative patterns of industrial relations. The course will examine the rise and reform of the project of European integration. The course will also address the particular problems faced by the East European countries as they attempt to make a transition from authoritarian, command economies to democratic, market-based economies. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 264. Politics of Contemporary China This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization. 6 cr., SI, IS, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 265. Capitalist Crises, Power, and Policy This course examines the interaction of national politics and international economic activity. Topics include the relationship between national and international finance, global competitiveness, and economic development. Case studies drawn from every continent. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, Offered in alternate years. WinterK. Freeze

POSC 266. Urban Political Economy City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required. 6 cr., SI, IDS, WinterR. Keiser

POSC 267. Comparative Foreign Policy Why do states act the way they do internationally? Why do some states act like "rogues" while others support the system? How do countries choose their allies or enemies? How do governments define their country's national interest and respond to global changes? Foreign policy is where internal politics and external politics intersect. Understanding any country's foreign policy requires that we pay attention to its position in the international system and its internal politics. In this course we will employ approaches from international relations and comparative politics to explore these questions across a range of countries. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 268. Global Environmental Politics and Policy Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. Prerequisite: none. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, QRE, FallT. Myint

POSC 269. Issues in Postmodern Political Thought This course will introduce several critiques of modern political thought and practice that considered "the project of modernity" to be either fatally flawed or at least deficient. Important themes in their work are the critique of the enlightenment and mass society, of power, agency as well as liberal concepts of the state and the political. In class discussion we will also address questions of method and language through the work of Nietzsche, Schmitt, Foucault, Habermas, Ricoeur, Bourdieu, Gadamer, among others. 6 cr., HI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 271. Constitutional Law I Covers American constitutional law and history from the founding to the breakdown of the constitution in secession crisis. Extensive attention will be paid to the constitutional convention and other sources of constitutional law in addition to Supreme Court cases. 6 cr., SI, FallK. Smith

POSC 272. Constitutional Law II Covers American constitutional law and history from Reconstruction to the contemporary era. Extensive attention will be paid to the effort to refound the American constitution following the Civil War as manifest in the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, and to the successive transformations which the Supreme Court worked in the new constitutional order. Political Science 271 is not a prerequisite. 6 cr., SI, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 274. Political Psychology of Presidential Foreign Policy Decision Making This course examines the intersection of politics, personality and social psychology as applied to the analysis of U.S. foreign policy. It investigates the impact of individuals, group processes, political and social cognition, and political context on foreign policy decision-making. It explores questions such as: How do personalities of political leaders affect decision-making? How do processes of group decision making affect outcomes? How do individual differences in social and political perception shape elite decision-making? Case studies will be drawn from major episodes in U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War and post-Cold War era. 6 cr., SI, IS, FallG. Marfleet

POSC 276. Arendt: Imagination and Politics We will investigate Hannah Arendt's conception of the political power of imagination, and explore the role hyperactive aesthetic imagination plays in the creation and mass dissemination of extreme political ideologies (i.e., tribal nationalism, racism, and Antisemitism). We will also examine how a benign active imagination, which is, nevertheless, essential to political judgment and political thinking in general, is possible at all. Readings will include The Origins of Totalitarianism, Eichmann in Jerusalem, The Jewish Writings, The Human Condition, and several of Arendt's essays on writers, such as G. E. Lessing, Heinrich Heine, Franz Kafka, Isak Dinesen, Bertolt Brecht, and Hermann Broch. 6 cr., HI, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 278. Memory and Politics The ways in which human societies narrate their past can powerfully impact their politics. It can enhance their capacity to be just or it can undermine it. The fashion in which history is told can help societies avoid conflict and it can heal the lingering memory of previous wars. At the same time, historical narratives can escalate violence and deepen socio-cultural and political divisions, inequality, and oppression. In this course we will learn about the various connections between history and politics by reading the works of G. W. F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, Hannah Arendt, and Paul Ricoeur. 6 cr., HI, IS, WinterM. Czobor-Lupp

POSC 281. Global Society: An Approach to World Politics One of the features of the Post-Cold War world has been the increased salience of issues such as terrorism, the environment, the influence of transnational corporations, the world-wide AIDS epidemic, the drug trade, and the crisis of refugees. The proliferation of such problems illustrates the limitations of state-centric international relations theory. This course examines new theoretical approaches to global politics that seek to understand how non-state actors and structures influence emerging patterns of global governance. We will debate as a class the extent to which a global society approach to world politics helps us to understand these transnational problems. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 282. Terrorism and Violence in World Politics This course will focus on the use of violence in world politics, with a specific emphasis on terrorism and crimes against humanity. The atrocities perpetrated by ISIS are the latest examples of violence targeting non-combatants. What is the strategic logic of terrorism? Why do some militant organizations resort to terror tactics but not others? What are the micro-dynamics of terrorist organizations pertaining to recruitment and indoctrination? We will tackle these questions from theoretical and empirical perspectives. We will also discuss issues such as genocides, humanitarian intervention, and the emergence of the right to protect doctrine. 6 cr., SI, IS, SpringH. Bou Nassif

POSC 282. Humanitarian Intervention and International Law This course is about crimes against humanity--e.g., genocide, apartheid, torture--and the dilemmas they pose in international law. When autocrats perpetrate crimes against humanity, should outside forces interfere to stop them? There is no easy answer to this question. Sanctifying the concepts of national sovereignty and non-interference leaves vulnerable civilian populations at the mercy of tyrants; but sanctioning outside interference and ignoring national sovereignties, facilitates foreign interventionism and threatens the political independence of small nations. We will tackle this question, and pay special attention to the emergence and logic of the responsibility to protect doctrine. 6 cr., SI, IS, SpringH. Bou Nassif

POSC 283. Separatist Movements This course explores the emergence and resolution of separatist movements around the world. While separatist movements are often associated with the violent dissolution of states, not all separatist movements result in violence and not all separatist movements seek independence. We will investigate the conditions under which separatist pressures are most likely to develop and when such pressures result in actual separation. We will contrast the tactics of movements, from peaceful approaches in places like contemporary Quebec or Scotland, to peaceful outcomes like the "velvet divorce" of Czechoslovakia, to violent insurrections in places like the Philippines, Spain, and Northern Ireland. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, SpringD. Gupta

POSC 285. The U.S. Intelligence Community Intelligence affects every aspect of the development of national security strategy and foreign policy objectives, and many other governmental decisions as well. Students will study the entire spectrum of the U.S. Intelligence Community, including the intelligence cycle; the many collection capabilities; the role of policymakers; intelligence oversight; budgeting; and the ethical and moral dilemmas of things like spying, covert action, counterintelligence, interrogation, and drone operations. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 286. A Comparative Study of the Vietnam and Iraqi Wars The course will examine America's wars in Vietnam and Iraq. The similarities and differences between these conflicts will be analyzed in an effort to determine the influences that shape America's decision to go to war. 3 cr., SI, IS, SpringB. Levin

POSC 288. Washington D.C.: A Global Conversation Part I Students will participate in a seminar involving meetings with leading Washington figures in areas of global policy making and regular discussions of related readings. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 289. Washington D.C. Seminar: A Global Conversation Part II Students will engage with leading scholars and practitioners in the field of political communication to learn how mass media, particularly TV news, influences politics. We will be especially attentive to United States news coverage of international events in new and old media and its importance in international relations, domestic perceptions of global political concerns (e.g. climate change and universal declarations of human rights). Our seminar readings will draw on research in political psychology and democratic theory. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 293. Washington D.C. Seminar: Global Conservation Internship 6 cr., NE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 303. Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion* Cross-listed with POSC.203. How does political advertising influence the electorate? Do "negative ads" turn voters off? Can advertising be used strategically to influence turnout, decreasing the participation of one of the major parties, while increasing the likelihood that others will vote? Election ads along with the six second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. The course includes a research component and students enrolled at the 300 level will conduct more extensive analysis of data for their seminar papers. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 306. How Race Matters in American Politics* How do the politics of race and ethnicity influence the modern development of American democracy? Problems of inequality and social marginalization. Racial attitudes and progress toward equality from the civil rights movement of the 1960s to the present. The relationship between protest and electoral politics in African American, Latino, and Asian American communities. Mechanisms for representation of racial-ethnic minorities at the national, state, and local levels of government. Controversies over racial-ethnic policy, such as affirmative action and bilingual education. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 313. Legal Issues in Higher Education This seminar will explore pressing legal and public policy issues facing American colleges and universities. Since the Supreme Court will rule shortly on a major affirmative action case, we shall first examine how college admissions are shaped by legal principles. The course will also address ways in which core academic values (e.g., academic freedom; robust exchanges of ideas; the creation and maintenance of a community based on shared values) fit or conflict with legal rules and political dynamics that operate outside the academy. Likely topics include campus speech; faculty tenure; intellectual property; student records; and student discipline. 2 cr., SI, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 320. Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Middle East* This course analyzes theories of authoritarianism and prospects for democratization in the Middle East. The course is divided into three sections: the first covers the main theoretical perspectives explaining the persistence of authoritarian rule in the Middle East. The second is devoted to the events of the Arab Spring, with an emphasis on Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia. Finally, the third section deals with two of the most pressing issues facing the countries of the Arab Spring: 1) the political role of Arab armed forces, 2) the integration of the long-banned Islamist groups into the public sphere as legitimate political parties. 6 cr., SI, IS, SpringH. Bou Nassif

POSC 322. Neoliberalism and the New Left in Latin America* This seminar will examine the "post-neoliberal" politics of Latin America, beginning with a reconsideration of the market-oriented turn in the region during the 1980s and 1990s. The seminar will then focus on the rise of leftist governments as diverse as Hugo Chávez' Venezuela, Evo Morales' Bolivia, and Lula da Silva's Brazil. Other topics will include the emergence of anti-neoliberal movements, the wave of indigenous politics, new social movements, environmental politics, and experiments with anti-poverty programs throughout Latin America. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 328. Foreign Policy Analysis* Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended. 6 cr., SI, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 330. The Complexity of Politics* Theories of complexity and emergence relate to how large-scale collective properties and characteristics of a system can arise from the behavior and attributes of component parts. This course explores the relevance of these concepts, studied mainly in physics and biology, for the social sciences. Students will explore agent-based modeling to discover emergent properties of social systems through computer simulations they create using NetLogo software. Reading and seminar discussion topics include conflict and cooperation, electoral competition, transmission of culture and social networks. Completion of the stats/methods sequence is highly recommended. 6 cr., SI, QRE, WinterG. Marfleet

POSC 332. Religion and Politics* In this class, we will investigate the relationship between politics and religion around the world. It is not a class on theology or belief systems. Instead, we will focus on describing and explaining how religious beliefs and organizations affect political outcomes and vice-versa. Topics will include the relationship between religion and the state, the political dimensions of religious movements, the religious dimensions of political movements, and how religious perspectives on such issues as gender, sexuality, race, and war reinforce or clash with political values and policy.  6 cr., SI, IS, FallD. Gupta

POSC 333. Global Social Changes and Sustainability* This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 334. Global Public Health* This seminar covers a variety of public health issues in advanced capitalist and developing countries, including communicable diseases, neglected tropical diseases and scourges such as malaria, dengue, and AIDS, the effectiveness of foreign aid, and the challenges of reforming health care systems. Emphasis will be on how these issues interact with patterns of economic and social development and the capacity of states and international regimes. Students will develop a perspective on public policy using materials from diverse fields such as political science, epidemiology, history, economics, and sociology. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, FallA. Montero

POSC 337. Political Economy of Happiness* This course explores the political determinants of happiness in the United States and around the world. What makes citizens happier in one country compared to another? When might political institutions be most successful at producing happiness among people? What is the relationship between economic inequality, development, redistribution and happiness? The course starts by examining how happiness is conceptualized and measured in public opinion data, before exploring the political economy of happiness globally. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, QRE, FallK. Freeze

POSC 338. Politics of Inequality and Poverty* The unequal distribution of income and assets is arguably the most important issue in many political systems around the world, and debates over the appropriate role of government in fighting inequality form a primary dimension of political competition. In this course, we will explore the politics surrounding economic inequality around the world. We will discuss how inequality influences political participation in democracies and dictatorships, shapes prospects for democratic transition/consolidation, and affects economic growth and social well-being. We will also examine when and how political institutions can mitigate negative aspects of inequality. Prerequisite: Political Science 230. 6 cr., SI, IS, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 348. Strangers, Foreigners and Exiles* We live today in a world characterized by an intense and unprecedented migration of individuals and groups. This makes the encounter with strangers a defining feature of contemporary societies, with tremendous economic, cultural, and political consequences. In this course we will explore the role that strangers, in general, play in human life, the challenges that foreigners create for democratic politics, the promises they bring to it, and the role that exiles can perform in improving the cultural capacity of societies to grasp difference. We will read texts by Arendt and Kafka, Derrida, Sophocles, Camus, Levinas, Heidegger, and Said. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 350. Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil* Cross-listed with POSC 256. Nietzsche understood himself to be living at a moment of great endings: the exhaustion of modernity, the self-undermining of rationalism, the self-overcoming of moralityin short, and most stunningly, the "death of God." Nietzsche both foresaw and tried to accelerate these endings. But he also tried to bring about a new beginning, a culture that he believed would be life-affirming and life-enhancing. In this course we will engage in a close study of Beyond Good and Evil, perhaps Nietzsche's most beautiful book and probably his most political one. Selections from some of his other books will also be assigned. 6 cr., HI, WinterL. Cooper

POSC 350. Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic* Cross-listed with POSC 250. In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book. 6 cr., HI, FallL. Cooper

POSC 351. Political Theory of Martin Luther King, Jr. This seminar will examine the speeches, writings, and life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Students will study King as an example of the responsible citizen envisioned by the theory expressed in The Federalist, as a contributor to the discourse of civil religion, and as a figure in recent American social history. 6 cr., SI, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 352. Political Theory of Alexis de Tocqueville* This course will be devoted to close study of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, which has plausibly been described as the best book ever written about democracy and the best book every written about America. Tocqueville uncovers the myriad ways in which equality, including especially the passion for equality, determines the character and the possibilities of modern humanity. Tocqueville thereby provides a political education that is also an education toward self-knowledge. 6 cr., HI, WR2, IDS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 355. Identity, Culture and Rights* This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods. 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 358. Comparative Social Movements* This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 359. Cosmopolitanism* Stoic philosophers saw themselves as citizens of the world (cosmopolitans). In the 18th century, Kant thought that the increasingly global nature of the world requires international political institutions to guarantee peace and human rights. After the Cold War cosmopolitanism was back in fashion. Even the favorite drink of the girls on TV’s Sex and the City was called Cosmopolitan. This course explores different meanings of cosmopolitanism: moral, political, and cultural. The intention is to show that cosmopolitanism is a complex reality that requires political institutions, as well as a new ethics to be cultivated through a particular engagement of culture. 6 cr., HI, SpringM. Czobor-Lupp

POSC 361. Approaches to Development* The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends? 6 cr., SI, WR2, IS, QRE, FallT. Myint

POSC 364. Capitalism and Its Critics* This research seminar examines the major debates in studies of contemporary capitalism in advanced capitalist and developing countries around the world. Moving beyond the classic theoretical debates of liberal, Marxist, developmentalist, and post-industrial arguments, the seminar will focus on recent debates concerning changes in labor markets, class structures, production systems, political institutions and social distribution, corporate governance, the multilateral system (e.g., IMF, the World Bank), supranational entities such as the European Union, and critical approaches on economic development, including new studies of the informal labor market. 6 cr., SI, IS, QRE, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 365. Political Economy of Global Tourism* As manufacturing has migrated to places with cheaper labor, many cities have turned to tourism to attract capital, employ low-skilled labor, and develop a niche in the global economy. We will pay particular attention to the consequences, for cities and their inhabitants, of the policy of tourism-driven economic development. We will also consider what it is that is being manufactured, marketed and sold in the tourist economy. Our investigation will proceed in an interdisciplinary manner, with inquiry into the political, sociological, anthropological, and economic consequences of tourism. Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites but participation in a college-level study abroad program will be an asset. 6 cr., SI, IS, Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 366. Urban Political Economy* City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? A research paper will be required. 6 cr., SI, IS, WinterR. Keiser

POSC 371. Modern Political Philosophy: Modernity and Its Discontents* Cross-listed with POSC.251. The philosophers who launched the modern age thought that humanity could achieve security and prosperity if people's concerns were directed away from transcendent longings (which often resulted in fanaticism and conflict) toward lower and more attainable ends. That project has borne impressive fruit. But it has also, almost from the beginning, stirred a restless discontent that has sometimes erupted in the form of utopian ideologies and totalitarian horrors. In this course we will study both those who helped launch the modern project (Hobbes, Spinoza, and/or Locke) and its most powerful critics (Rousseau, Nietzsche). 6 cr., HI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 378. Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Social Changes in Southeast Asia Informed by the assigned readings, students will visit markets, factories, farms, and various cultural and natural sites to see first-hand the changes and challenges occurring in these areas. The course covers: (1) issues of livelihood transition from rural to urban; (2) the interaction between market systems and social relations; and (3) the impact on society of changes in physical infrastructures such as roads and telecommunication. Students will keep a journal and produce three thematic short essays, a 15-20-minute video, or a well-organized blog to document their learning. 6 cr., SI, IS, WinterT. Myint, Local Faculty

POSC 379. Political Econ & Ecology of S.E. Asia: Diversity of Social Ecological Systems in Southeast Asia Connecting the first and the second components, this course examines key actors, issues, and interests in the political economy of and ecology of Southeast Asia. Students will connect economy to ecology in Southeast Asia by connecting field experiences and observation to real data, facts, and cases that illustrate the interaction between economy and ecology. This course requires students to identify a topic of interest based on their field experience, research it using techniques taught in the field research and methods course, and write a research report in the form of a term paper.  6 cr., SI, IS, WinterT. Myint

POSC 383. Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Politics of the European Union This course examines the formation, development, institutions, laws, and major policies of the European Union. It will introduce students to some of the key challenges of EU-level governance and pressing policy problems facing the European community. In addition to classroom activities, students will travel to Brussels and other sites to meet with policy makers and observe the dynamics of EU institutions, including the Committee of the Regions, the European Parliament in Strasbourg, and Frontex (the EU's border control agency) in Warsaw. 6 cr., SI, IS, Not offered in 2014-2015.

POSC 392. Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Field Research Experiences and Methods This course provides a comparative field research experiences for students. Students will carry out a project involving a combination of research techniques including questionnaires, interviews, and participant observation. Students will learn to develop quantitative reasoning and qualitative analyses based on field experiences. Students will write a short paper reflecting on their experience doing field research and present their findings to the class. An alternative assignment is to write a descriptive paper for a global audience to be published on Wikipedia. 6 cr., NE, WinterT. Myint

POSC 400. Integrative Exercise 6 cr., S/NC, Fall,Winter,SpringStaff