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Past Course Offerings

Spring 2014

Applied ACE Courses

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Kelly Connole (10 students)

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students will do research and design publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.

Human Reproduction and Sexuality - BIOL 101 - Matt Rand (28 students)

The myths surrounding human reproduction and sexuality may out weigh our collective knowledge and understanding. This course will review the basic biology of all aspects of reproduction--from genes to behavior--in an attempt to better understand one of the more basic and important processes in nature. Topics will vary widely and will be generated in part by student interest. A sample of topics might include: hormones, PMS, fertilization, pregnancy, arousal, attraction, the evolution of the orgasm, and the biology of sexuality. Students work on curriculum for local schools and Carleton campus

Plant Biology - BIOL 236 - Jalean Petricka (20 students)

How do plants work? This course is framed in the context of advances in evolution and genomics, which offer insight into physiological, developmental, morphological, and anatomical adaptations to diverse environments. Emphasis is placed on experimental approaches to the study of plants. The biology behind current issues related to food and agriculture, including genetically modified organisms, will be investigated. Students worked on plant and human projects in the arb and also with the Real Food Challenge.

Topics in Virology - BIOL 370 - Debby Walser-Kuntz (19 students)

An examination of selected animal viruses. The course focuses on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host. In addition to studying the structure and replication of particular viruses the class also discusses the current laboratory techniques used in viral research. Students worked on a project in Africa as well as several in the Northfield area.

Mobile Application Development - CS 342 - Jeffrey Ondich (12 of 47 students)

Software used to stay on the desktop where you put it. Now, we carry multi-purpose computational devices in our pockets. Mobile computers raise a host of software design challenges, with constrained visual spaces, touch screens, GPS sensors, accelerometers, cellular access, and cameras all in one device. More challenges come from the idea of an "app store," a five-year-old experiment that has changed the way developers and computer users think about software. In the context of a few app development projects, this course will focus on mobile computing's design patterns, user interface principles, software development methodologies, development tools, and cultural impact. Students designed apps in groups, several had energy application or other potential usage for the Carleton campus.

Race, Immigration, and Urban Schools - EDUC 340 - Anita Chikkatur (2 of 7 students)

This course explores the important role that public schools, particularly in urban areas, have played in the American national imagination as the way to socialize students about what it means to be American and to prepare them to participate as citizens in a democracy. Students in the course will engage with the community in a variety of projects. In spring 2014, students helped high schoolers in Faribault develop a new club to deal with race issues, which will continue into the 2014-15 school year.

Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis - EDUC 375 - Eric Swan McDonald (7 students)

This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad. Through journal articles, guest speakers and other texts, students will consider the teaching of the sciences through the lenses of history, sociology, philosophy and educational policy. This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice. In spring 2014 students worked on a variety of applied projects including designing a girls geology summer camp for Northfield middle schoolers

Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - EDUC 386 - Cathy Oehmke (3 students)

The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. The course will cover instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension.  Students for this class will partner with students from the Prairie Creek Community School to work on reading skills.

Senior Seminar - EDUC 395 - Anita Chikkatur (16 students)

This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Recent seminars have been on educational reform and reformers, service learning, literacy leaders in education, education and the emotions, and personal essays about education. In spring 2014, students investigated youth activism and all of the students engaged in bringing an awareness of youth activism to the broader campus.  A few of the students also worked with a new LGBT support group that was forming in Faribault.

Research Methods in Environmental Studies - ENTS 232 - Kim Smith (16 students)

This course covers various methodologies that are used to prosecute interdisciplinary academic research relating to the environment. Among the topics covered are: identification of a research question, methods of analysis, hypothesis testing, and effective rhetorical methods, both oral and written. Students analyzed transportation needs and challenges for Northfield middle schoolers and residents at the Northfield Retirement Home, providing reports back to community partners to help address these challenges.

FOCUS Colloquium - IDSC 198 - Deborah Gross (16 students)

This colloquium is designed to give students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program an opportunity to learn and use skills in scientific study, reasoning, and modeling. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term, and allow students to develop competencies in areas relevant to multiple science disciplines. Over the course of the year, the freshmen built new tools to measure air pollution and in the spring began to go the middle school to get preliminary measurements.

FOCUS Colloquium - IDSC 298 - Cindy Blaha (12 students)

This two-credit sophomore colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to research light pollution and give public reports on their findings.

Designing a Curriculum for Math GED - MATH 237 - Deanna Haunsperger (8 students)

We will help local communities respond to the latest changes in GED requirements by observing how GED mathematics is currently taught and preparing new curricular materials to teach it in the future. Students conducted their own research on light pollution in Northfield and on campus and developed an hour long presentation on light pollution and its impacts on humans, animals, and the environment which they shared at a public presentation on campus and upon invitation at a meeting of the Northfield Environmental Quality Commission.  They have been invited to speak at other public gatherings and are completing a research report which they will publish on light pollution for broader distribution.

Designing a Curriculum for Math GED - MATH 237 - Deanna Haunsperger (8 students)

In January 2014, the Graduate Equivalency Diploma (GED) was privatized and all prior educational materials were no longer useful.  Deanna led a group of students through the development of on-line math support materials for the new GED, collaborating in the process with Faribault Community Education’s adult basic education program which plans to integrate these materials into their course offerings.  The materials have also been requested by the St. Paul adult basic education program and Deanna may continue to work on this effort with some of the same students in the upcoming year.

Statistical Consulting- MATH 280 - Katie St. Clair (12 students)

Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics. Projects this spring included efforts with a MN based Korean adoptee group, the League of Women Voters (in a project which was carried over from Annette Nierobisz’s sociological methods course in the winter of 2014), and others.

Animal Ethics: The Moral Status of Animals - PHIL 243 - Sarah Jansen (10 students)

Do non-human animals have moral status, or are our moral obligations confined to human animals? Is our past and present treatment of animals morally justified? What bearing does the nature of animal minds and social behavior have on these questions? And how should human beings, both individually and collectively, practically apply ethical principles regarding nonhuman animals? In this course we shall explore these and related questions in a hands-on and interdisciplinary way, incorporating insights from prominent ethical traditions (e.g., utilitarianism, deontology and virtue ethics), cognitive ethology, anthropology and political science. Students in this course spent time helping out with a local sustainable chicken producer who is training immigrants to be small scale poultry farmers.  The class culminated in a celebration at the farmer’s home where students participated in butchering and preparing chickens for them and other invitees to eat, thereby exposing them in a very close up way with ethical questions.

The Politics of Food: Producers, Consumers, and Citizenship - POSC 222 - Pat Cavanaugh (22 students)

Although what we eat everyday is familiar and biologically intimate, it is also a part of a complex political system. In this course we will learn about and reflect upon the political aspects of food in the U.S. Topics include food history, agribusiness, local food movements, food policy, and social justice. The course includes guest speakers and field trips. Students in this class researched food products and produced educational materials which they shared with the local coop.

Hormones and Behavior - PSYC 218 - Sara Meerts (29 students)

In this course, students will learn about the relationship between hormones and behavior. The approach in this course will be based in biological psychology and will emphasize the experimental evidence upon which our understanding of hormones and behavior is constructed. Students will learn about the techniques used to ask questions in neurodocrinology. Topics will include the endocrine system, sexual differentiation, the stress response, and reproductive and parenting behaviors. In spring 2014, students produced short videos about hormones which they showed to middle school students in an after school program and with whom they then had follow-up discussions.

Language and Deception - PSYC 375 - Mija Van Der Wege (12 students)

In this course we will examine deception and persuasion in language use. We will take up three main issues. The first is what it means to deceive and how people deceive others through language. What methods do they use, and how do these methods work? The second issue is why people deceive. What purposes do their deceptions serve in court, in advertising, in bureaucracies, in business transactions, and in everyday face-to-face conversation? The third issue is the ethics of deception. Is it legitimate to deceive others, and if so, when and why? Students in this class actively participated in Intro to Psychology classes at the local high school where in groups they worked with groups of students analyzing advertisements and learning psychological theories used in advertisements.  The class culminated in a performance of mental engineering at the Cave to which they high schoolers were invited.  The following days, the students in Mija’s class hosted mini versions of mental engineering in the classes at the high school, providing them with the opportunity to teach psychological theories and apply their insights with others.

Global Religions in Minnesota - RELG 289 - Shana Sippy (19 students)

This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with hands-on research with living communities in Minnesota including Muslims in Faribault, Hindus in Eagan, and Cambodian Buddhists in Hampton. The studies and experiences may be published online.

Girls Gone Bad: Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice - SOAN 202 - Annette Nierobisz (28 students)

Students in the class will have the possibility of collaborating with the Rice County Corrections on projects or with the Alternatives to Violence Program currently running in the Faribault prison.

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcon (16 students)

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. Each student will take on a project based on their own interests.

Theoretical ACE Courses

Global, National, and Human Security - POSC 236 - Greg Marfleet (26 students)

What are the greatest threats to national and global security? In this course we will explore a range of traditional security topics including: the proliferation of WMDs, terrorism, piracy, insurgencies, arms races, territorial disputes and strategic rivalries. In addition to these classic concerns, we also consider newer ones such as cyber-security, the threat of global pandemics, unmanned warfare and the impact of climate change. Our study begins and concludes with the debate over the concept of security in the twenty-first century. Students in this class researched issues of security at various levels and conducted interviews with professionals in the field, many located in Washington DC, in order to bring a lived experience into their course readings.

Independent Study Classes

Students with specialized interests will work with specific professors on independent study projects:

Matt Rand- Health and Sexual Education Curriculum Design (1 student) This student designed and implemented curriculum about sexual education for the local alternative high school and supported students in Matt’s spring course on sexuality when they designed their own educational materials for on campus and off.  She had taken the course earlier and was able to draw upon that and her own experiences working on these issues at Carleton when she designed her own curriculum and supported other students.

Social Entrepreneurship Independent Study (1 student) The student researched social entrepreneurship as a form of civic engagement in higher education  and prepared a report to help Carleton consider developing such a program.

Adrienne Falcon- High School-College Access Project (2 students) Students teach and mentor local high school from underserved communities who are participating in on-line college courses at Riverland Community College.  In the independent study they do readings on college access and on-line learning and use these to reflect upon and analyze their experiences in the classroom with the high schoolers.

History Department- Project on SCOPE Program (Student Community Outreach Project Experience) Carleton students are helping local 8th graders research, write, and publish their own book on Northfield History, which will be used as a textbook for area 3rd grade classes. (3 students)

Deborah Gross and Eric McDonald– Food Science Curriculum Development (6 students) This year long project has involved students in designing kitchen science curriculum for middle schoolers which has been implemented in both Northfield and Faribault.

 

Winter 2014

Applied ACE Courses

Immunology - BIOL 310 - Debby Walser-Kuntz (33 students)

Students are partnering with the MN Celiac Center and Northfield's Just Food Co-op on projects related to celiac disease. One group will write a grant proposal to help fund free screening for celiac disease; more than 95% of the population with celiac disease remain undiagnosed and unaware that they have this autoimmune condition. Students in the Immunology course will also be developing curriculum for the MN Celiac Center's Gluten Detective Agency, a children’s program whose focus is to “Investigate, Advocate, and Celebrate” and to help the children live well with a chronic condition. This program is expanding to a national level, and students in the course will help with curricular planning as well as grant writing to support the expansion. In partnership with the Rice County Public Health Department, students will be developing a Myth Busters-style video on the topic of vaccines and their safety for participants in the WIC program. A second group will be researching the links between asthma, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Their report will be shared with public health departments at the county and state level as an important first step in garnering future grant funding to support public health and policy work surrounding asthma in Rice County. In collaboration with students enrolled in the Topics in Medical Ethics course, this group project involves developing a public health lunch conversation and blog related to the immunology and ethics of transplantation. This project links to "The Question" hosted annually by EthIC and the Philosophy department, with this year’s question being "Should you be allowed to sell your body (parts)?"

Introduction to Educational Studies - EDUC 110 - Anita Chikkatur (15 of 25 students)

Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.

Multicultural Education - EDUC 238 - Anita Chikkatur (10 of 24 students)

Students in this course have the opportunity to enrich their learning through engagement with the community by volunteering at Faribault High School.

A Journey in Journalism - ENGL 272 - Doug McGill (26 students)

In this workshop class, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students create and publish their own works of journalism in digital media of their choosing including but not limited to personal blogs, podcasts, videos, still photography, online graphics and multimedia. Journalism as a truth-finding and truth-telling discipline is the underlying skill set taught in a learning by doing (as opposed to lecture style) format. Short classroom discussions on ethics and craft, based on recent published journalism and current events, are interspersed throughout.

History Beyond the Walls - HIST 216 - Serena Zabin (12 students)

A central component of the course includes a civic engagement project mentoring sixth grade students at the Northfield Middle School as they research and produce projects for Minnesota History Day.

Statistical Consulting - MATH 280 - Katie St. Clair (11 students)

Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

African Drum Class - MUSC 192 – Jay Johnson (7 students)

Class instruction in basic techniques of African drumming. Students performed for Prairie Creek Community School.

Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization - POSC 209 - Pat Cavanaugh (19 students)

This class will research a current case study of sand mining for fracking in Winona, Minnesota.

Methods of Social Research - SOAN 240 - Annette Nierobisz (10 students)

The class is working with the Northfield League of Women's voters. They will construct surveys and interview members in order to illustrate the composition of league, its perceptions in the community, and ways that they could improve recruitment.

Field Investigation in Comparative Agroecology - ENTS 261 - David Hougen-Eitzman (12 students)

The course begins with a two-week visit in December to Beijing and Sichuan province. Field work will include visits to Chinese farms at the forefront of an incipient sustainable agriculture movement in China, as well as discussions with Chinese sustainable agriculture researchers. In regular weekly meetings during the winter term on campus, data will be analyzed and presented in oral and written reports.

Introductory Coaching Practicum - PEAR 174 - Bob Carlson (21 students)

This practicum will culminate with a service-learning project in Seville offering free sports clinics to local schools. No previous coaching experience required.

Special Project: Systems Approaches for Sustainability  - PHYS 356 - Melissa Eblen-Zayas (14 students)

Students in this course are working on four projects related to sustainability: designing a net zero warming house, designing a low-energy/low-heat/low-water year-round greenhouse, a system for sustainability projects, and exploring ways to implement the Green Steps program for the City of Northfield.

Issues in Science Education: Policy and Praxis - EDUC 375 - Eric Swan McDonald (14 students)

This colloquium focuses on the pedagogy of science teaching, both in the United States and abroad.  Through journal articles, guest speakers and other texts, students will consider the teaching of the sciences through the lenses of history, sociology, philosophy and educational policy.  This course will also include active involvement with local schools and educators to ground it in lived practice.

FOCUS Colloquium - IDSC 198 - Deborah Gross (16 students)

This two-credit freshman colloquium will provide students with the opportunity to build air quality sensors to learn about the science around air pollution and to develop community based measurements.

Topics in Public Health - IDSC 265 - Debby Walser-Kuntz (16 students)

Topics in Public Health will mix introductory text-based discussions with panels and discussions facilitated by visiting speakers. Classes will cover a wide array of topics including community partnership, professionalism, and social theories of health equity. Through this course, we hope that students will gain knowledge of the key principles in public health and preparation for practical experiences in the field.

SCOPE Independent Study (3 students)

History majors working with gifted eighth-graders to create educational materials around Northfield history in collaboration with history teachers at Northfield Middle School and the Northfield Historical Society.

PSEO Independent Study (10 students)

Students volunteer as teaching assistants for online classes at a local community college. They partner with TORCH, and offer the courses to juniors and seniors at Northfield High School to receive free college credit.

Theoretical ACE Courses

Topics in Medical Ethics - PHIL 222 - Daniel Groll (5 of 24 students)

Over the past forty years, the idea that competent patients have the right to make decisions about their own care has become paramount in medical ethics and medical practice. But the primacy of patient autonomy as a value raises a host of interesting questions: What can (or should) clinicians do when patients make poor decisions? What does it mean for a patient to be competent? Who should make decisions in those cases where the patient is deemed incompetent? And when, if ever, can clinicians refuse to offer treatment on moral grounds? We will explore these issues through a combination of philosophical readings and case studies.

Environmental Anthropology - SOAN 333 - Constanza Ocampo-Raeder (11 students)

Students in this course have the opportunity to develop an annotated bibliography on a topic that is related to work being done by environmentalist organizations in the region.

 

Fall 2013

Applied ACE Courses

Health Psychology – PSYC 260 – Ken Abrams (24 students)

This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement. Prerequisite: Psychology 110. 6 cr., SS; LS

ACE Component: Students in small groups will critically examine the effects of local public (e.g., town) or private (e.g., hospital) policies on health outcomes. More specifically, students will work with local policy makers to investigate an issue, propose policy changes supported by theory and research, present formal proposals to the policy makers, and solicit and respond to community feedback. Additionally, groups will present their findings to the class and community representatives at a poster session at the end of the term. Examples of past projects include the development of a heroin use prevention program at Northfield High School, a comprehensive worksite wellness program at Northfield Hospital, and a more accessible and better marketed farmers' market in Northfield.

Adolescent Cognitive Development: Developing an Identity and Life Plans - CGSC 386 – Kathy Galotti (12 students)

An examination of recent literature on how adolescents develop their value system, explore their goals, begin to make life-framing decision, establish new relationships, and discover answers to the question "Who am I?" Course readings will involve primary literature, and the course is discussion-based. Prerequisite: Psychology 250, Educational Studies 234 or consent of the instructor. 6 cr., SS; SI

ACE Component: In this community based learning class, students will be visiting a classroom in local schools eight times over the course of the quarter.

Environmental Ethics - ENTS 215 – Kim Smith  (23 students)

This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought. It investigates such questions as whether we can have moral duties towards animals, ecosystems, or future generations; what is the ethical basis for wilderness preservation; and what is the relationship between environmentalism and social justice. 6 cr., ND; HI

ACE Component: This course allows students apply the ethical debates in environmental policy and practice to five case studies in Northfield. In groups of five to six, students spend the term investigating environmental ethics behind a range of current and pertinent issues in the college and in Northfield. In the process, they get the opportunity to work with actors and stakeholders in the community and consider how environmental ethics play a role in these cases. This year the projects consider a range of topics from feral cats in the Arboretum to the value of the Eat the Lawn Project to Divestment.

Educational Psychology - EDUC 234 – Deborah Appleman (24 students)

Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students. No prerequisite. 6 cr., SS; SI

ACE Component: Educational Psychology brings together theory and classroom experience to help Carleton students form a better understanding of teaching and learning.  Carleton students act as classroom assistants and tutors in local schools, giving them a context with which to understand their studies.  This experience also gives students a chance to reflect upon education and its practices in a hands-on and practical manner.

Introduction to Educational Studies - EDUC 110 – Anita Chikkatur (6 of 26 students)

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students. 6 cr., SS, WR; SI, WR2, IDS

ACE Component: This course provides an option of spending time in one of the after-school tutoring or enrichment programs in Northfield or Faribault as part of the class to develop a better understanding through experience of concepts from the course.

Statistical Consulting - MATH 280 – Katie St. Clair (8 students)

Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 245 and permission of instructor. 2 cr., S/CR/NC, ND; FSR, QRE

ACE Component: the course will be assisting with two on-campus assessment projects, one with the QUIRK initiative and the other with ACE assessment as part of a national assessment venture in which we are engaged.

Topics in Probability and Statistics: Introduction to Sampling Techniques - MATH 315 - Katie St. Clair (11 students)

Covers sampling design issues beyond the basic simple random sample: stratification, clustering, domains, and complex designs like two-phase and multistage designs. Inference and estimation techniques for most of these designs will be covered and the idea of sampling weights for a survey will be introduced. This course will also teach methods for graphing complex survey data and exploring relationships in complex survey data using regression and chi-square tests.

Renaissance Worlds in France and Italy - HIST 232 – Victoria Morse (9 of 19 students)

Enthusiasm, artistry, invention, exploration.... How do these notions of Renaissance culture play out in sources from the period? Using a range of evidence (historical, literary, and visual) from Italy and France in the fourteenth-sixteenth centuries we will explore selected issues of the period, including debates about the meaning of being human and ideal forms of government and education; the nature of God and mankind's duties toward the divine; the family and gender roles; definitions of beauty and the goals of artistic achievement; accumulation of wealth; and exploration of new worlds and encounters with other peoples. 6 cr., HU, WR; HI, WR2, IS

ACE Component: Students will be going to Prairie Creek Elementary School and Northfield Middle School to lead an enrichment opportunity around Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night that will culminate in a field trip to visit the Carleton exhibit related to the play’s production.

Ecosystem Ecology - BIOL 221 – Dan Hernandez (23 students)

This course examines major ecosystems on Earth, including terrestrial, wetland, lake, river, estuarine, and marine systems. Topics include the two major themes of energy flow and production and decomposition, microbial ecology and nutrient transformations, element cycles, ecosystems as a component of the Earth System, and global change. Current applied issues are emphasized as case studies, including clear cutting, rising atmospheric CO2, eutrophication of aquatic systems, acid rain, wetland delineation, and biodiversity effects on ecosystems. Concurrent registration in Biology 222 is required. Prerequisite: Biology 126 and one of the following: Biology 125, Geology 110, Chemistry 123 or 128. 6 cr., MS; NE, QRE

ACE Component: This course studies the Earth's major ecosystems.  Students will learn about the processes that constitute ecosystems, as well as the contemporary issues affecting various ecosystems.

The course will be collaborating with the Main Stream Project to do analysis of the effects of sustainable chicken production on nitrogen and other cycles as well as developing units for a middle school youth center field trip to the Arboretum to teach the principles of ecosystems ecology.

Geomorphology - GEOL 210 - Mary Savina (25 students)

Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota.

Nonfiction I - CAMS 270- Laska Jimsen (13 students)

 This course addresses nonfiction media as both art form and historical practice by exploring the expressive, rhetorical, and political possibilities of nonfiction production. A focus on relationships between form and content and between makers, subjects, and viewers will inform our approach. Throughout the course we will pay special attention to the ethical concerns that arise from making media our of others' lives. Whether you want to produce social documentary, experimental nonfiction, or a media-based comps project, this class will give you the tools you will need. The class culminates in the production of a significant nonfiction media project. Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 111 or permission of instructor. 6 cr., AL; ARP

ACE Component: The class will create a film about composting at Carleton.

Food Culture in the United States -AMST 252 – Audrey Russek (20 students)

We explore the creation, exchange, and consumption of food in America, and the spaces in which it is produced, sold, shared, and eaten, focusing especially on food as a cultural artifact that is intricately tied to individual and group identification. We will study what Americans eat now, how American cuisine has changed, and how food is intertwined with ideas about cultural and national identity. We'll consider geography, home and community cooking, business and industry, and globalization in the formation and evolution of eating culture in the U.S. and ways in which food practices overlap with politics, power, and national identity. 6 cr., HU, RAD; SI, IDS

ACE Component: The class will be partnering with the Northfield Community Action Center’s Food Shelf.

Theoretical ACE Courses

Contemporary Fiction and the Market - SPAN 328 – Palmar Álvarez Blanco (15 students)

 In this course we will be studying the various meanings of what has been labeled, esthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity. We will also study the relationship between "postmodernism" and what has been called the "culture of contentment" or "culture of well-being," and we will attempt to understand the interactions that exist between culture, market and dominant ideology. To develop this theme we will focus on Spain, but will also continually establish relationships with other countries. This course includes many cultural products (novels, films, documentaries, animated essays, visual poetry, gag cartoons, graphic novel, comics, etc.). Evening films, guest lectures. Prerequisite:Spanish 205 or Spanish 207. 6 cr., LA, IS

ACE Component: In this class students will critically explore environmental cycles at Carleton in connection with learning about art and alternative visions from Spain and Europe. They will also learn from documentary filmmakers from Spain about the changing world system and alternative possibilities.

Anthropology of Good Intentions -SOAN 203- Costanza Ocampo-Raeder (24 students)

Is the environmental movement making progress? Do responsible products actually help local populations? Is international AID alleviating poverty and fostering development? Today there are thousands of programs with sustainable development goals yet their effectiveness is often contested at the local level. This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them. In doing so we hope to uncover common pitfalls behind good intentions and the need for sound social analysis that recognizes, examines, and evaluates the role of cultural complexity found in populations targeted by these programs. Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

Comparative Social Movements -POSC 358- Dev Gupta (11 students)

This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.

Independent Study Classes

Students with specialized interests will work with specific professors on independent study projects:

Melissa Eblen-Zayas- Organic Composting in Northfield (1 student)

Deborah Gross- Food Science and middle school youth program development (4 students)

Adrienne Falcon- Highschool-college Access Project (8 students)

History Department- Project on SCOPE Program (Student Community Outreach Project Experience) Carleton students are helping local 8th graders research, write, and publish their own book on Northfield History, which will be used as a textbook for area 3rd grade classes. (3 students)


 

Spring 2013

A Journey in Journalism - ENGL 272 - Doug McGill  (23 students)

In this workshop-style class in journalistic storytelling, the classroom becomes a newsroom and students become working journalists reporting on Carleton and Northfield events as well as broader social issues, personalities, and trends of their choosing. Working in a multimedia lab, students will create and publish their stories online in a variety of digital platforms and styles. Guided by the journalistic values of truthfulness, fairness, and serving the public interest, students in this class may choose stories of any locale and scale and work in any online medium they choose--from blogging and still photography to videos, podcasts, and infographics.

Carleton in the Archives: Studies in Institutional Memory and Culture - HIST 115 - Paul Petzschmann (16 students)

Ours is a world of institutions - schools, corporations, government agencies - that shape the way we act, think, and remember. The memory of institutions themselves, the records they keep and the way these repositories are organized and used is crucial for their functioning and survival. What is the relationship between "official" and "individual" memory in the making of an institutional world? We will explore this and related questions through readings, discussion, and a hands-on project based on materials in Carleton's own archives.

Museums, Monuments, and Memory - HIST 285 - B. Horrigan (12 students)

"History" is not just the name of a department at Carleton College; "History-making" is an activity engaged in by everybody, everyday. We watch historical movies, listen to political leaders invoking history in making policy, tour historic sites and museums, etc. We listen to our elders tell us stories about their lives, and we tell ourselves stories that place our experiences into the historical continuum. This course ranges widely over the varied and sometimes risky terrain of contemporary history-making in Minnesota and beyond to examine preservation organizations, museums, archives, oral history projects, documentary films, historic sites, schools, theater, TV, and cyberspace. 

Introduction to Peace Studies -SOAN 236- N. Saidei (7 students)

Peace studies is an evolving and emerging holistic interdisciplinary study of collective harmony and collective violence. In this course we will study the alternative definitions of peace and examine the relation between peace and a variety of societal factors including modernity, post modernity, international anarchy, forms of state, cultural construction of violence, religious prejudice, patriarchy, nuclear weapon, ecology, militarism, globalization and a global civil society and culture. 

 

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Kelly Connole (10 students)

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students will do research and design publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.


Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - EDUC 386 - Cathy Oehmke (7 students)

The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. The course will cover instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension.  Students for this class will partner with students from the Prairie Creek Community School to work on reading skills.

Senior Seminar - EDUC 395 - Deborah Appleman (9 students)

This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Recent seminars have been on educational reform and reformers, service learning, literacy leaders in education, education and the emotions, and personal essays about education. Some off campus work with public school students and teachers is an integral part of the seminar.  The academic civic engagement component for this class will focus on charter schools.


Global Religions in Minnesota - RELG 289 - Shanna Sippy (15 students plus 4 independent study students)

This course examined how global religions adapt to and transform the disparate local communities where their practitioners make home. Students supplemented historical and theoretical instruction with hands-on research with living communities in Minnesota including Muslims in Faribault, Hindus in Eagan, and Cambodian Buddhists in Hampton. The studies and experiences may be published online.

Food Justice -POSC 223- Pat Cavanaugh (21 students)

Systems for growing, processing and distributing food have been subject to claims that they are unjust, yet problems persist. This course will examine concepts of justice and apply them to issues related to farmworkers, factory workers and others who produce our food, poverty and access to food, and genetically modified organisms as they relate to control of production.  We will ask how justice relates to sustainability.  Although the course will focus on the United States, global issues such as immigration and food sovereignty will be included.  Students will have the opportunity to explore food justice issues in other countries. 

Ethics of Civic Engagement - SOAN 285 - Adrienne Falcón (20 students)

In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. Each student will take on a project based on their own interests.

Abrupt Climate Change -ENTS 288- T. Ferrett (15 students)

The field of abrupt climate change seeks to understand very fast changes, or "tipping points," in historical climate records. Course topics include interpretation of historical climate data, methods of measuring abrupt changes in ancient climates, theories for abrupt change, the role of complex earth systems, and the connection to trends in global climate change. The course will directly address our future vulnerability to abrupt climate change through cases studies of past human civilizations. Includes a term-long multimedia team project, with an academic civic engagement component, at the intersection of abrupt climate change and an issue of human concern. 

Peru Off-Campus Studies Program- (20 students doing civic engagement components)

Independent Studies: SCOPE, Global Religions Project, PSEO (12 total students)

 

 

Winter '13

Methods of Social Research -  SOAN 240 - Annette Nierobisz (19 students)

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable. The class will partner with the NESNA neighborhood association around Carleton and develop a survey for them and partake in interviews examining the meaning of community and building neighborhood ties for both elder residents and college students.

Immunology -BIOL 310- Debra Walser-Kuntz (33 students)

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Foundations of Modern Europe -HIST 139- Susannah Ottaway (22 students)

A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe, with particularly close examination of the history of Spain. 

Africans in the Arab World: On Site and Revisited -HIST 286- T. Willis (6 students)

This course is the second part of a two-term sequence. It begins with a two-week December-break trip to Dubai, UAE, to visit museums, mosques, other heritage sites, universities, media outlets, and markets. It promotes dialogue with Afro-Arab women around the historical constructions of gender, race, and ethnicity in heritage sites, Islam, Arab media, academic institutions, and popular culture. Ultimately, students will ponder Afro-Arab women's voice and visibility beyond the home in this Arab society. Then upon return to Carleton, students will reflect upon their experiences in the UAE, analyze their data, and present it in oral, written, and visual formats.

Anthropology of Health and Illness -SOAN 262- P. Feldman-Savelsberg (16 students)

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Women's Lives in Pre-Modern Europe -HIST 236- Victoria Morse (6 students)

Did women have a Renaissance? Were women increasingly relegated to a separate sphere from men: "domesticated" into the household? Or, on the contrary, is the history of European women characterized by fundamental continuities? This course seeks to answer these questions through an exploration of women's place in the family and economy, laws and cultural assumptions about women, and women's role in religion. Throughout the term, we will be focusing not only on writings about women, but primarily on sources written by women themselves, as we seek a fuller understanding of the nature of European women's lives before the modern era.

Materials Science, Energy, and the Environment -ENTS 262- Melissa Eblen Zayas (27 students)  

Drawing on chemistry and physics principles, this course will focus on the relationship between the structure and physical properties of materials, how materials science can address environmental and energy challenges, and the technological and societal impacts of materials development. Topics to be covered will vary from year to year, but may include material life cycle assessment, traditional plastics and biodegradable alternatives, materials and technologies for solar energy conversion, and the role of materials in developing energy efficient buildings. 

Methods of Teaching Science -BIOL 302- D. Walser-Kuntz (10 students)

This course will explore teaching methods for the life and physical sciences in grades 5-12. Curricular materials and active learning labs will be discussed and developed. In addition, time outside of class will be spent observing and teaching in local science classrooms. Will not count toward a biology major.

 

Fall '12

Early Medieval Worlds -HIST 137- Bill North (44 students)

Through the intensive exploration of four "worlds" in the early Middle Ages (Late Antique Italy, Anglo-Saxon England, Carolingian Europe, the Holy Roman Empire) this course seeks to offer an introduction to formative political, social, and cultural developments in Europe between c. 250 and c.1050s. Particular attention will be paid to the sources of our knowledge of early medieval people and polities. Development of a student-designed public exhibition on early medieval books and scribal culture will be an essential element of the course. Students will be bringing these outreach projects to three different local schools.

Agroforestry Systems: Local and Global Perspectives -ENTS 247-Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh (13 students)

This course will examine the principles and practices of tropical and temperate agroforestry systems. Focus will be given to the ecological structure and function of agroforests, the economic costs and benefits of agroforests, and the social context in which agroforests operate. Specific topics include plant/soil relationships, competition and complementarity, biogeochemical cycling, design principles, and the synergies and tradeoffs among economic, social, and ecological management goals.

Educational Psychology - EDUC 234 - Deborah Appleman (24 students)

Educational Psychology brings together theory and classroom experience to help Carleton students form a better understanding of teaching and learning.  Carleton students act as classroom assistants and tutors in local schools, giving them a context with which to understand their studies.  This experience also gives students a chance to reflect upon education and its practices in a hands-on and practical manner.

Methods of Political Research -POSC 230- Greg Marfleet (22 students)

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. 

Geomorphology -GEOL 210- Carrie Jennings (24 students)

Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota. Laboratories and field trips included.

Media and Election Politics: 2012 Election  -POCS 100- Barbara Allen (16 students)This seminar introduces basic methods of political analysis through a case study of media and politics in the 2012 elections. Students will participate in a study of election advertising and produce projects to be displayed at an exhibition. Concepts from public opinion analysis and political psychology will be used to understand the 2012 campaigns. Our work will focus on content analysis of the effects of campaign ads and news coverage.

Media and Electoral Politics: 2012 United States Election -POSC 204- Barbara Allen (29 students)

Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news using our multi-year data set of content analyzed election ads and news. These will be presented at a political engagement exhibition. We study a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods to learn how political communication affects U.S. elections.

Comparative Social Movements -POSC 358- Dev Gupta (21 students)

This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.

Spring '12

Advanced Ceramics - ARTS 330 - Kelly Connole (12 students)

Students in this art course will create over 500 bowls for a yearly event to highlight the problems that hunger creates in society. The event is called Empty Bowls and includes a fundraiser selling the handmade bowls with soup provided by the Carleton community for the Northfield Food Shelf. Students will do research and design publicity based on hunger in a local context in collaboration with the Northfield Community Action Center. Bowls are a fundamental skill in the field of ceramics and the bowls that students made for the event were designed as tokens to remind participants to give back.

Plant Biology - BIOL 236 - Susan Singer (31 students)

Both the Northfield School District and Prairie Creek, a local Charter school, have made substantial changes in their school lunch programs to emphasize healthy food choices and local food sources. Students in this course will study the nutritional effects of various plant-based lunches, and will create trading cards to teach students about healthy snacking.

Topics in Virology - BIOL 370 - Debby Walser-Kuntz (19 students)

The course will focus on the most recent developments in HIV-related research, including implications for HIV-treatment and vaccines and the impact of viral infection on the immune system of the host. Students will work on one of three projects. One group will meet with Northfield and Faribault high school students interested in medical careers and organize a career event for them. Another group will work with the Gender and Sexuality Center to develop educational materials, and another will partner with Daniel Groll's Bioethics class to prepare a presentation on ethical issues in mother-child transmission of AIDS and refusal of medication.

Classical Mythology - CLAS 111 - Clara Hardy (3 of 31 students)

We will study a selection of the most famous Classical myths through close reading of Homer, the Greek tragedians, Ovid and other ancient sources. In addition we'll discuss the most prominent of modern modes of myth interpretation, in an attempt to determine how myth speak - both to the ancient world and to us. The course's civic engagement component will involve working with local 4th and 5th graders.

Teaching Reading in the Content Areas - EDUC 386 - Cathy Oehmke (3 students)

The course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for helping secondary teachers learn to provide specific instructional support for secondary readers. The course will cover instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and text comprehension.  Students for this class will partner with students from the Prairie Creek Community School to work on reading skills.

Senior Seminar - EDUC 395 - Anita Chikkatur (11 students)

This is a research and design seminar for educational studies concentrators. It focuses on a contemporary issue in American education. Recent seminars have been on educational reform and reformers, service learning, literacy leaders in education, education and the emotions, and personal essays about education. Some off campus work with public school students and teachers is an integral part of the seminar.  The academic civic engagement component for this class will focus on charter schools.

Environmental Law and Policy - ENTS 310 - Kim Smith (5 of 15 students)

This seminar will examine topical issues in domestic and international environmental law and policy. Students will aim to understand how environmental laws work to achieve policy objectives, with attention also to debates about the role of markets and community-based environmental management. This year, students will be looking at a policy analysis of the Ames Mill Dam in downtown Northfield. They will examine the current environmental issues surrounding the dam as well as its history.

The French Art of Living: Tradition, Myth, Reality - FREN 349 - Cathy Yandell (22 students)

Through literature, art, architecture, and theory, students will explore French notions of what it means to live well, from Renaissance sumptuousness to existentialist questioning to the depiction of immigrants’ lives in contemporary Paris. The program will examine the ways in which the physical environment fashions attitudes and practices that define the good life (urban and rural settings, the north and the south, housing projects and seascapes). Whenever possible, course readings and student writing will be linked with experiential learning in Paris and southern France. Students will volunteer in the banlieux (primarily diverse low income school districts) of Paris. 

Introduction to Statistics - MATH 215 - Bob Dobrow (55 students total, 2 sections, 4 students did additional independent study projects)

Students will analyze member surveys of satisfaction and interest in Northfield Senior Center. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables.

Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization - POSC 209- Pat Cavanaugh (11 students)

This class will explore concepts of democracy, power, identity, and sense of place as we examine cases of citizen mobilization. The class will research a current case study of an environmental controversy that gave rise to citizen mobilization. Some students will look at the Wind Farm proposals in Red Wing, Minnesota and their impact on endangered species in that area. The class will examine the conflicting views of different environmental organizations. Another group will research in depth the political backgrounds of five different foods and prepare materials for tabling in Sayles