Recent Grants

  • Andrea Mazzariello, Andrea MazzarielloVisiting Assistant Professor of Music, has been awarded a $5,000 “Established Artist” grant from The Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council for his new musical project, “Plant Another Flower.” With the SEMAC grant, Andrea will develop a new piece of music and words to perform himself, centered on drums, keyboards, voice, and electronics played simultaneously. He will premiere this “one-person band” work - which merges his experience playing rock music with his experience writing concert music - at the Northfield Arts Guild in March 2017.

  • Christopher Calderone, Christopher CalderoneAssistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant for his project “RUI: Condensation Domain-Catalyzed Dehydration.” His research identifies new pathways by which bacteria and fungi produce molecules known as non-ribosomal peptides, examples of which include such therapeutically important medicines as cyclosporin and penicillin. This project involves four student researchers each year, the development of educational modules for undergraduate teaching labs at Carleton, and the development of curriculum for the public-private LearningWorks partnership program in downtown Minneapolis to teach underserved middle-school students molecular biology concepts and techniques.

  • Matt WhitedMatthew Whited, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been named a Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar by the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, a major funder of chemistry research and teaching activity. The Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences at undergraduate institutions. The award is based on accomplishment in scholarly research with undergraduates, as well as a compelling commitment to teaching, and provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000.

    Professor Whited’s research program focuses on chemical synthesis involving transition metals, with a particular interest in carbon dioxide transformation for renewable fuels, and has involved 18 Carleton students since 2011. The grant will fund equipment purchases to support cutting-edge research with Carleton undergraduates as well as conference travel for Professor Whited and his students. The award also provides funds for supporting departmental expenses associated with research and education, and these have been designated for developing course-based research opportunities in the Chemistry Department.

  • Michael Flynn, Michael FlynnWilliam H. Laird Professor of Linguistics and the Liberal Arts and Chair of Linguistics, and Jeff Ondich, Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, have been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation's Documenting Endangered Languages program for a project entitled “Fostering Dakota Language Restoration through Workshops: First Steps to Partnering by the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, the Dakotah Language Institute, and Carleton College.” Jeff Ondich

    Through this project, Flynn, Ondich, Associate Professor Catherine Fortin, and Assistant Professor Cherlon Ussery will work in close partnership with a team of Dakota educators to advance the formal description of the endangered Dakota language, and begin planning to produce comprehensive courses and accessible electronic resources about Dakota language and culture.

    The project's centerpieces are a workshop, to be held at Carleton in late summer 2016, at which Carleton faculty and students will collaboratively work with Sisseton-Wahpeton educators and Dakota speakers on the Dakota language, and a follow up visit by Carleton faculty and students to the Oyate in eastern South Dakota in the fall.

  • Rob Thompson, Rob ThompsonAssistant Professor of Mathematics, has been accepted as a mentor for the program “Preparation for Industrial Careers in Mathematical Sciences” (PIC Math). As part of this program, Rob will advise a group of Carleton students as they tackle industrial mathematics research problems proposed by business, industrial, and government partners. Students will present problem solutions directly to company liaisons and publicly at the national “Mathfest” conference in Summer 2017. PIC Math is a program administered by the Mathematical Association of America and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, with support from the National Science Foundation (DMS-1345499).

  • Paul Petzschmann, Paul PetzschmannLecturer and Research Associate in European Studies, has been awarded a Summer Stipend from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for his project “Student Exchanges Between the United States and Nazi Germany 1933-1941.” During the summer of 2016 he will continue research on student exchanges and transatlantic networks during an isolationist period between the U.S. and Nazi Germany. Paul's project will contribute to several pieces of scholarly work on the U.S.-German relations, including a journal article, a book chapter, and sections of his book on German-American intellectual migration between 1930 and 1950.

  • Alex Knodell, Alex KnodellAssistant Professor of Classics and Co-Director of Archaeology, has been awarded two grants in support of the Mazi Archeological Project, which he co-directs with colleagues from Switzerland and Greece. The Loeb Classical Library Foundation and the Institute for Agean Prehistory have provided funds to support mapping, geophysical survey, and aerial thermography at newly discovered and previously known prehistoric, Classical, and Byzantine-period sites in northwest Attica, Greece. Located in the Kithairon mountain range and on the borders of the historical polities of Athens and Thebes, the Mazi Plain was a critical crossroads between the regions of Attica and Boeotia, as well as central and southern Greece. This funding furthers two previous years’ field work; four Carleton students joined the team last year and three to four will participate in summer 2016. For more information, see www.maziplain.org.

  • Yansi Perez, Yansi PerezAssociate Professor of Spanish, has received the Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship by the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) for her project “Los Angeles: A Cartography of Material Memory of the Central America Diaspora.” A residency at California State University in the Department of Central American Studies during 2016-2017 will enable Professor Perez to research culture and memory among populations from Central America’s Isthmus who were displaced post wars and revolutions, and to reconceptualize the problems of memory, mourning, and trauma.

  • Matt Whited,Matt Whited Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER grant for a five-year project entitled "Cooperative Small-Molecule Activation by Ambiphilic Pincer-Type Complexes Featuring Metal/Main-Group Bonds." His project, involving as many as 23 undergraduate researchers, seeks to develop new approaches to difficult chemical transformations such as selective oxidation of hydrocarbons and reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical feedstocks, with the goal of extending these reactions to earth-abundant and sustainable metal catalysts.

    Professor Whited will meet the CAREER program's mandate that his research have a broad social impact by continuing development and assessment of course-based undergraduate research experiences. He will also be expanding an outreach effort to bring Northfield and Faribault, Minnesota high-school students, including many who belong to groups that are underrepresented in post-secondary education, into Carleton chemistry laboratories.

  • Rini Y. Keagy, Rini KeagyVisiting Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies, has been awarded a Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant in media arts to complete post-production of Ordinal, a film about valley fever, a fungal disease that afflicts California's Central Valley. Combining literature such as Steinbeck's Grapes of Wrath and ancient Assyrian myth, the film uses documentary, fictional, and animation techniques to explore biological and environmental forces affecting humans and Earth. Screenings will take place in Northfield and the Twin Cities.

  • Cecilia Cornejo, Cecilia CornejoVisiting Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies, received a Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant to complete pre-production on her new film. The project explores issues of displacement and belonging as experienced by the Latino community of Northfield, Minnesota. The finished work will combine elements of fiction with documentary techniques to present a nuanced vision of reality from a Latino perspective.

  • David Musicant,David Musicant Professor of Computer Science, was awarded an ACM-SIGCSE (Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education) Special Projects Grant to fund student research on his project "Git for People Who Actually Want to Learn Git."