Courses

See the requirements for the concentration for more information on courses in other departments that are relevant to cognitive studies.

PaperPlans2

  • CGSC 130: How to Build A Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Science

    Cognitive science is a multidisciplinary field of inquiry involving biology, computer science, linguistics, philosophy and psychology whose aim is to understand the nature of the human mind. This course will explore current models of human cognition, including artificial intelligence, connectionism, modularity theory, dynamical systems, robotics and embodied cognition. Specific topics to be explored from these perspectives include the nature of mental representation. consciousness, reasoning, language and vision. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • CGSC 130: Rationality, Intuition, and the Nature of Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Science

    An inerdisciplinary examination of issues involving thinking, reasoning, and decision-making; mental representation; language, perception, and the acquisition of new knowledge; and the development of learning and intelligence. The course will draw on relevant work from diverse fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience, and will provide an overview of the history and pracive of the newly-emerging field of cognitive science. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement; not offered 2014–2015
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 130

     Fall 2010 Syllabus: Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 130: What Minds Are, and What They Do: An Introduction to Cognitive Science

    An interdisciplinary examination of issues concerning the mind and mental phenomena. The course will draw on work from diverse fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience. Topics to be discussed include: the mind-body problem, embodied cognition, perception, representation, reasoning, and learning.   6 credit; Writing Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2015 · J. Decker
  • CGSC 232: Cognitive Processes

    Cross-listed with PSYC 232. An introduction to the study of mental activity. Topics include attention, pattern recognition and perception, memory, concept formation, categorization, and cognitive development. Some attention to gender and individual differences in cognition, as well as cultural settings for cognitive activities. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Psychology 233. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Cognitive Science/Psychology 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Science with Lab, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2014 · K. Galotti
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 232

    Fall '14 Syllabus: Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 233: Laboratory Research Methods in Cognitive Science

    Cross-listed with PSYC 233. Students will participate in the replication and planning of empirical studies, collecting and analyzing data relevant to major cognitive phenomena. Prerequisites: Psychology 110 or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: Psychology 232. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Cognitive Science/Psychology 232 and 233 to satisfy the LS requirement. 2 credit; Science with Lab; offered Fall 2014 · K. Galotti
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 233

    Fall '14 Syllabus: Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 236: Thinking, Reasoning, and Decision Making: Experimental Approaches

    In this course, we will learn about the cognitive science of high-level mental processes, viz., thinking, reasoning, and decision making, with a special focus on reasoning within the context of moral decision making. In addition to learning about what is already known concerning the operation of high-level mental processes, students will have the opportunity to take part in the design and implementation of one or more experimental studies that may add to our knowledge of such processes. Prerequisites: Any Cognitive Science 100-level course or permission of the instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2015 · K. Galotti
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 236

     Winter 2008 Syllabus: Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 330: Embodied Cognition

    This seminar will consider recent work in philosophy, cognitive science and linguistics critical of views of human cognition as "disembodied" and Cartesian. Philosophical sources of the early critiques of symbolic AI and "cartesianism" will be considered (Heidegger, Dewey), as will the linguistic theories of George Lakoff and Ray Jackendoff and recent and current work on embodied cognition by Eleanor Rosch, Hubert Dreyfus, John Haugeland, Andy Clark and Herbert Brooks. The seminar will include materials relevant to students in philosophy, linguistics, psychology and cognitive science. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 130, or Cognitive Science/Psychology 232 or permission of the instructor. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • CGSC 380: Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Cognitive Development During the Preschool Years

    We will consider the development of memory, perception, and attention, as well as concepts and categorization, problem-solving and thinking, during the years from two to six. We will focus particularly on how these developments are reflected in children's spontaneous behavior and play. Course requirements will include readings, class discussions, short papers, a final project, and regular observation of preschoolers or kindergarteners. Prerequisites: Psychology 250 or Educational Studies 234 or permission of the instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · K. Galotti
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 380

     Winter 2011 Syllabus:  Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 385: Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood

    We will consider the development of memory, perception, and attention, as well as concepts and categorization, problem-solving and thinking, during the years from six to 11. We will focus particularly on how these developments are reflected in children's academic learning and social relationships. Course requirements will include readings, class discussions, short papers, a final project, and regular observation of school-aged children. Prerequisites: Psychology 250 or Educational Studies 234 or permission of instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 385

     Fall 2011 Syllabus: Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 386: Adolescent Cognitive Development: Developing an Identity and Life Plans

    An examination of recent literature on how adolescents develop their value system, explore their goals, begin to make life-framing decision, establish new relationships, and discover answers to the question "Who am I?" Course readings will involve primary literature, and the course is discussion-based. Prerequisites: Psychology 250, Educational Studies 234 or consent of the instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
    Extended departmental description for CGSC 386

    Fall 2013 Syllabus: Professor Galotti

  • CGSC 394: Collaborative Research in Cognitive Science

    This course will be centered around a collaborative research project in cognitive science. Students enrolled will meet with the instructor to complete background readings and discussions, then will create recruiting materials, consent forms, IRB applications, debriefing statements, stimuli, and task instructions. They will then gather data from research participants and participate in data entry and analysis. Prerequisites: Cognitive Science 233 or Psychology 233 2 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2015 · K. Galotti
  • CGSC 396: Directed Research in Cognitive Studies

    Senior majors in cognitive studies will work with the director to develop a thesis proposal for their comps project. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. 3 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · K. Galotti