Courses

  • CLAS 100: Killing Socrates

    Socrates is revered as the fountainhead for much of Western philosophical thought, so why did a jury of 500 Athenian citizens condemn him to death in 399 BCE? While we tend to think of Socrates strictly as a philosopher, this course will focus more on the type of man he was, and the problems he presented to the city of Athens in the late fifth century. In short, we'll be doing some critical thinking about one of the world's great critical thinkers. Readings from Greek drama, history and philosophy. 6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2014 · C. Hardy
  • CLAS 100: The Trojan Legend: Mythology, Archaeology, and Legacy

    The rage of Achilles, the face that launched a thousand ships, Greeks bearing gifts, Brad Pitt's leg double...The Trojan Legend is one of the most reproduced, adapted, and controversial stories of all time. Troy's roots at the foundations of western literature have inspired countless works of art, literature, and film, which for millennia have retold this epic set of tales. In this seminar we will explore the legend of the Trojan War through ancient and modern literature and art, as well as the archaeological sites, civilizations, and imaginary places that have contributed to this legend down to the present. 6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2014 · A. Knodell
  • GRK 101: Elementary Greek

    Study of essential forms and grammar, with reading of connected passages. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2015 · R. Hardy
  • LATN 101: Elementary Latin

    Study of essential forms and grammar. This course should be elected by all students who have taken less than two years of secondary school Latin or who have not studied the subject for two or more years before entering college. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · Staff
  • GRK 102: Intermediate Greek

    Study of essential forms and grammar, with reading of original, unadapted passages. Prerequisites: Greek 101 with a grade of at least C-. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2015 · C. Hardy
  • LATN 102: Intermediate Latin

    Continuation of essential forms and grammar. Prerequisites: Latin 101 with a grade of at least C-; or placement by examination during New Student Week. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2015 · A. Knodell
  • GRK 103: Greek Prose

    Selected prose readings. The course will emphasize review of grammar and include Greek composition. Prerequisites: Greek 102 with a grade of at least C-. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · A. Knodell
  • LATN 103: Introduction to Latin Prose and Poetry

    The course is designed to help students make the transition from the discrete rules of morphology and syntax to the integrated reading of extended passages of Latin prose and poetry with fluency and understanding. The first half of the course will focus on the consolidation of grammar through a systematic review of morphology and syntax based on compositional exercises keyed to passages of medieval Latin and Cicero. The second half will equip students with the basic skills needed to engage ancient Latin poetry, including meter, genre, rhetorical devices and poetic tropes, as encountered in selections from Ovid's mythological epic, Metamorphoses. Prerequisites: Latin 102 or placement. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2015 · Staff
  • CLAS 110: Introduction to Classical Studies

    This course will examine in depth the two most content-rich focal points of Classical antiquity--Periclean Athens and Early Imperial Rome--since they provide a context for so much of what Classics is about and, just as important, what different ages have imagined antiquity to be about. The course will cover Athens and Rome in roughly equal units, providing different perspectives on the material from the variety of approaches that currently make up the study of the Classics: history, archaeology, anthropology, gender studies, literary criticism, philology, religious studies, etc. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Winter 2015 · C. Zimmerman
  • CLAS 111: Classical Mythology

    Myth was an integral component of thought, both individual and societal, in the ancient cultures of Greece and Rome. We will study a selection of the most famous Classical myths through close reading of Homer, the Greek tragedians, Ovid and other ancient sources. In addition we'll discuss the most prominent of modern modes of myth interpretation, in an attempt to determine how myth speaks--both to the ancient world and to us. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 112: The Epic in Classical Antiquity

    An introduction to the genre of epic poetry from Classical Antiquity. Students will read in translation examples from the Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman traditions in order to trace the development of the major features and themes of this genre and to understand the considerable influence this genre has exerted both during antiquity and thereafter. Authors will include Homer, Apollonius, Virgil, and Lucan. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 116: Ancient Drama: Truth in Performance

    The tragic and comic stage offered the Greeks and Romans a public arena for addressing in an engaging way such fundamental topics as love, family, justice, and the divine. Although the written word has fortunately preserved for us many ancient plays, the proper media for their communication remains, as their authors intended, the stage, the voice, and the body. This course will therefore address a variety of ancient tragedies and comedies with special attention, not only to their themes, but to the manner of their staging and performance. 6 credit; Arts Practice; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 119: Pompeii and the Cities of Vesuvius

    Pompeii and the other cities destroyed by Vesuvius are very different from other archaeological sites in terms of their destruction, excavation and preservation. This course aims to introduce students to the wealth of evidence from Pompeii that can be used to examine Roman urban life, but also to make them aware of the problems that affect our knowledge and interpretation of this evidence. Topics will include: the eruption of Vesuvius; history and urban development; architecture; domestic and public life; neighborhoods and villas; graffiti; entertainment; death and burial. We will also look at current conservation issues that affect the archaeological remains. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 121: Greek Art and Archaeology

    This course provides a survey of the art, architecture, and archaeology of the ancient Greek world, as well as an introduction to archaeological methods. The evolution and development of Greek material culture will be tracked chronologically from Prehistory to the Hellenistic Age. Major monuments and the minor arts will be examined from sites such as Mycenae, Knossos, Athens, Delphi, and Olympia. The goal of this course is to equip students with the analytical skills necessary to interpret material culture and learn how to use archaeological remains to reconstruct various aspects of culture and society. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 122: The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory: From the Beginning to the Classical Age

    "Never say that prehistory is not history." The late Fernand Braudel had it right. Over 99 percent of human history predates the written word, and this course examines one of the world's most diverse, yet unifying environments--the Mediterranean Sea--from the earliest populations around its shores to the emergence of the Classical world of the Greeks and Romans. Neanderthals and modern humans, the first artists and farmers, multiculturalism among Greeks, Phoenicians, Etruscans, and others... These are some of the topics to be covered as we study the precursors and roots of what would become "Western" civilization. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · A. Knodell
  • CLAS 125: Love, Death and Destiny: The Ancient Novel

    The novel is an unfamiliar but delightful area of Greek and Roman literature, with its heyday in the Roman empire of the second century AD. We will study most of the nine Greek ones, which are romantic short novels about ill-fated lovers and their wild, world-wide adventures. We will also read the two Latin ones, Petronius' Satyricon and Apuleius' Metamorphoses, or Golden Ass, which are rich both in satire and an important spiritual dimension. No prerequisites. Read in English. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 127: Ancient Technology

    Technology--humanity's efforts to manipulate its physical environment--stands as a central concern of the modern world. This course examines the technology of the ancient world and investigates its integral relationship to other facets of human activity. Theories of technological change will be explored initially in order to develop a socially-informed understanding of technology. In the second part, students will investigate specific ancient technologies using archaeological and textual evidence and present their findings to the class. The goal of this course is to understand technology as a social phenomenon in both the ancient and modern worlds. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 173: Sport and Daily Life

    This course is an exploration of life, death, and entertainment in the ancient world, particularly in Rome. We will focus especially on how and why people take part in sporting events and on how sport intersected with gender, social class, and economic concerns in the ancient world. Topics include the history of sport, slavery and marginal groups, demography, gladiatorial and combat events, and entertainment and politics. Our primary focus in lecture and discussion will be interpretation of a variety of ancient sources, but we will also evaluate modern views of ancient entertainment. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 204: Intermediate Latin Prose and Poetry

    Students will consolidate their knowledge of the Latin language through a variety of readings of extended passages of both prose and poetry, supplemented by composition exercises. Attention will be paid to matters of literary style, context, and, where appropriate, meter. By the end of the course, students should be able to navigate the Latin language from the classical period with understanding and confidence. Prerequisites: Latin 103 or placement. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · R. Hardy
  • GRK 204: Greek Poetry

    Selected readings from Homer (in odd-numbered years) or Greek Tragedy (in even-numbered years). Prerequisites: Greek 103 with a grade of at least C- 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2015 · H. Wietzke
  • CLAS 214: Gender and Sexuality in Classical Antiquity

    In both ancient Greece and Rome, gender (along with class and citizenship status) largely determined what people did, where they spent their time, and how they related to others. This course will examine the ways in which Greek and Roman societies defined gender categories, and how they used them to think about larger social, political, and religious issues. Primary readings from Greek and Roman epic, lyric, and drama, as well as ancient historical, philosophical, and medical writers; in addition we will explore a range of secondary work on the topic from the perspectives of Classics and Gender Studies. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 222: Nature and the Environment in the Ancient World

    As moderns, we often think of Nature as an ancient concept. But how old is our idea of the Natural exactly, and what did people think about the environment before the advent of environmentalism, Romanticism, and Christianity as prevailing modes of Western thought? This course will explore how Greeks and Romans conceived of and engaged with their natural environment(s), with special attention to the ways in which ancient ideas differ from modern ones. Using textual and material sources, we will examine ancient attitudes towards nature and the environment through literature, philosophy, religion, politics, science, etc. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 227: Greek History: Greek World From the Rise of the City-State to the Rise of the Hellenistic Kingdom

    A survey of the civilization of the ancient Greeks, emphasizing the evolution of the city-state as a cohesive social, political, and economic organism. The development of the city-state as a response to the physical environment of Greece will form a component of this study, as will a discussion of the historical method: how do we use the few surviving archaeological remains and little written evidence to reconstruct the history of these people and their institutions? The period covered in depth will run from the beginning of the city-state ca. 750 BC to the conquests of Alexander the Great (336-323 BC) and the legacy of international monarchies that followed. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 228: The Roman Republic

    Introduction to Rome's political and social history from the Etruscan period to the end of the Republic. Topics include Roman political culture, the acquisition of empire, the role of the army, the psychology of Rome, and interpretation of historical evidence. Based largely on primary source readings. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 230: The World of Alexander

    This course examines the background, career, and legacy of Alexander the Great and the emergence of the Hellenistic monarchies. The first part of the course examines the developments of the Fourth Century BCE, including classical philosophy, politics, and art; the rise of Macedon; Alexander the Great; and the wars of Alexander's successors. The second part explores the philosophical, cultural, and scientific world of Ptolemaic Egypt. The course focuses throughout on the lives and experiences of individuals and their place in a rapidly changing society. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · K. Steed
  • CLAS 230F: Hellenistic Greek: Scientific and Documentary Texts

    This trailer course will introduce students to scientific and documentary Greek texts from the Hellenistic world. Texts will include the Hippocratic Oath, Plutarch's descriptions of the inventions of Archimedes, brief selections from scientific works, and papyri containing personal letters and documents from Ptolemaic Egypt. In addition to regular readings, we will work with images of papyri and discuss the challenges of deciphering these texts. Prerequisites: Greek 103 or equivalent. Corequisite: Classics 230. 2 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2015 · K. Steed
  • CLAS 231: The Roman Principate

    This class is an introduction to the history of Rome from the accession of the first Roman emperor Augustus in 31 BCE to the death of Severus Alexander in 235 CE. It examines the political and military events of the period (including the reigns of individual emperors like Augustus, Nero and Hadrian), as well as themes such as the nature of imperial power and the image of the emperor, social and economic structures, the nature and administration of empire and the relationship between central power and local cultures. Based largely on primary source readings and appropriate visual/material evidence. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • GRK 233: Longus' Daphnis and Chloe

    Readings of selected portions of the novel in Greek and the entire text in translation. Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 233: Catiline

    In this course we will explore the life, career, and defeat of L. Sergius Catilina as portrayed in Sallust's Catiline and Cicero's Catilinarian Orations. We will supplement our Latin with reading in translation and secondary articles. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • GRK 240: Xenophon's Oeconomicus

    Xenophon's Oeconomicus is a fascinating text preserving valuable primary evidence on Classical Athenian attitudes toward gender, household management, marital relations, slavery, urban and rural domestic life, and household religion among many other topics. We will read selections of the Greek and the whole in English, as well as some of the very interesting secondary literature--from Foucault to Leo Strauss--in this unique work. Prerequisites: Greek 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 242: Apuleius,

    Selections from the Golden Ass in the original as well as reading the entire work in English translation. Prerequisites: Latin 204 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 245: Cicero

    Representative readings, in Latin, across the range of Cicero's literary activity, including oratory, philosophy, criticism, and correspondence. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • GRK 245: Herodotus's Histories

    In this course we will read and examine selections from Herodotus's Histories in Greek, as well as the whole of the work in English. We will explore questions about historiography, culture, ethnicity, ancient warfare, contact between Greece and Persia, among other issues. Prerequisites: Greek 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2015 · K. Steed
  • LATN 246: Livy

    In this course we will read and examine selections from Livy's ab Urbe Condita in Latin, as well as the larger work in English. We will explore questions about historiography, culture, politics, ancient warfare, and the city of Rome, among other issues. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · K. Steed
  • GRK 248: Ancient Greek Composition

    Practice in composing Greek prose. Prerequisites: Greek 103 or any higher-level Greek course. 3 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 248: Latin Composition

    Practice in composing Latin prose. 3 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 251: Translation Theory and Practice

    We live in a world permeated by different languages at every level--from literary texts to multilingual instruction manuals, from newspapers and books to songs and films--and we all translate every day, whether we know it or not. This course aims to examine major issues related to translation, including its history, theory, and practice, as well as what ideological and ethical concerns translation poses today. We will also explore translation's relationship to issues of literature, religion, culture, race and ethnicity, and sex and gender. Prerequisites: Competence in any language other than English beyond four terms of study, or permission of the instructor. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 253: Seneca the Younger

    Seneca the Younger was a key figure in the reigns of the Roman Emperors, Claudius and Nero. He was a prolific writer and a major force in shaping the moral philosophy of the later Roman world. This course will examine Seneca's thought and lively writing style by reading samples from a broad selection of his prose works (philosophical essays and letters) as well as his tragedies. There will be a short paper (six-eight pages) in addition to other assignments designed to familiarize students with some of the research tools and practices of the discipline. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 255: Tacitus

    A survey of the works of the Roman Silver Age historian and rhetorician Gaius Cornelius Tacitus, reading Latin excerpts and selections in English translation. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 257: Caesar, Lucan, and Civil War

    This course will examine narratives of the early stages of the Roman Civil War through contemporary prose accounts of Caesar and Cicero and the poet Lucan's Neronian epic on the Civil War. Topics will include manipulation of public opinion and memory, historical reconstruction through text, the relationship between prose history and historical epic, and the literal and metaphorical dissolution of Rome through civil war, as well as stylistic and philosophical concerns specific to each author. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 258: Seminar: Horace

    Selection from Horace's Odes, Epodes, Satires and Epistles in Latin and the remaining works in translation. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 259: Seminar: Vergil

    Intensive study of selections from Vergil. May be offered simultaneously with Latin 359 without the supplemental assignments for advanced students. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; offered Spring 2015 · R. Hardy
  • LATN 280: Martyr Texts from Roman North Africa

    Through close reading and discussion of Latin texts on Christian martyrdom from the second and third centuries, including The Martyrdom of Perpetua and Felicity and Tertullian's To the Martyrs, we will discuss the qualities of the newly emerging Christian Latin. We will also examine how these authors construct an image of a new hero--the martyr--in the classical landscape and the nature and meaning of their struggle. Prerequisites: Latin 204. 2 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · W. North
  • GRK 280: Philosophers and Martyrs

    Through the close reading and discussion of two texts from Late Antiquity in their original Greek, Lucian's On the Death of Peregrinus and the anonymous Martyrdom of Polycarp, we will gain experience in the reading and comprehension of late Hellenistic and koine Greek. We will also explore the ways in which these texts and their literary construction offer insight into the thought-worlds within which both Christian and various pagan philosophical schools developed. Prerequisites: Greek 204 or equivalent. 2 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · W. North
  • GRK 304: Greek Tragedy for Advanced Students

    Intensive study of one play in the original and the remaining plays in translation. Offered simultaneously with Greek 204, with additional assignments for the advanced students. Prerequisites: Greek 204. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015 · H. Wietzke
  • GRK 305: Homer

    Intensive study of selections from Homer's Iliad or Odyssey. Offered simultaneously with Greek 204, with additional assignments for the advanced students. Prerequisites: Greek 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2015
  • LATN 345: Roman Comedy

    Selected readings in the original from Plautus and/or Terence; study in translation of both Roman Comedy and its predecessor Greek New Comedy. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 347: Latin Love Poetry

    Reading the poetry of Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid in Latin, we will explore how different poets conceived of love by embracing or rejecting cultural, societal, and political expectations in first century BCE Rome. We will examine how Greek literature and thought influenced Roman ideas about love, as well as how Latin authors shaped the course of love poetry and songs in the West. We will also consider a range of topics related to love in antiquity, including sexuality, gender, courtship rituals, marriage, and children. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 349: Ovid's Fasti

    Reading Ovid's Fasti--a poem about the origins, practice, and significance of ancient holidays--we will explore how Romans approached ideas of sacred time and space, both conceptually and practically. We will consider a variety of related issues, including ancient religion, calendars, etymology, and origin stories. We will also examine how issues of sex and gender, public and private worship, politics, propaganda, and competing ideologies are reflected and challenged in the process of creating and explaining holiday and festival occasions. Supplemental readings in Catullus, Vergil, Livy, and other of Ovid's poems. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GRK 351: Aristophanes

    Intensive study of one or two plays in the original and of the remaining plays in translation. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • GRK 352: Thucydides

    Study in the original of selections from Thucydides Peloponesian War and in translation of the entire work. Prerequisites: Greek 204. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • LATN 359: Vergil

    Intensive study of selections from Vergil. May be offered simultaneously with Latin 259, with additional assignments for the advanced students. Prerequisites: Latin 204 or the equivalent 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Writing Requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • CLAS 394: Senior Seminar

    As part of their senior capstone experience, majors in the classics department will formulate a call for papers developing the current year's theme for a colloquium, and following standard guidelines of the field produce proposals ("abstracts") for their own papers to be presented in the winter term. 3 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · C. Zimmerman
  • CLAS 400: Senior Symposium

    From proposals ("abstracts") developed in Classics 394, departmental majors will compose a twenty minute presentation to be delivered at a symposium on the model of professional conferences. The talks will then be revised into articles to be submitted to a journal of professional style, accepted and edited by the group into a presentable volume. Prerequisite: Classics 394. 3 credit; S/NC; offered Winter 2015 · C. Zimmerman