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Posts tagged with “Alumni” (All posts)

  • Ellen Root '07 Explains The Geology Of America's Western Coast

    June 20, 2010

    We are paddling along the western edge of the North American continent, where land meets water. For this week's Notes from the Trail, we asked Ellen Root, our geology expert, to provide us with an explanation of the geology of this region. Here is what she told us:

    You may already know that sea level on Earth changes over time. This depends on temperatures on the whole Earth as well as the amount of ice that is frozen in glaciers and the polar ice caps. At different times in Earth’s history we could have been traveling through what is now land far from the ocean’s edge or among islands that presently lie deep beneath the surface of the water. Today we want to talk about another aspect of the coastline we see each day. We want to look at the rocks that form the support structure for the plants, animals, people, and buildings we have encountered as we paddle along the Canadian coast. Many people think of rocks as solid and immovable, but every day they are moving, very slowly, on a scale so large it can be difficult to comprehend. The science that explains this process is called Plate Tectonics.

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  • Nate Evenson ’10 Cited For Outstanding Oral Presentation

    June 15, 2010

    We have just learned that Nate Evenson ’10 was recognized for the “Outstanding Undergraduate Oral Presentation” at this spring’s Cordilleran Section of the Geological Society of America meeting in Anaheim, California.  Nate’s title was, “U-Pb zircon geochronology and provenance of the Paleogene–Neogene Kootznahoo Formation, southeast Alaska.”  The award includes a check for $400.

    Congratulations Nate!

  • Nate Ryan '10 Is Among New Graduates Who Hunt For Jobs With College's Help

    May 25, 2010

    Northfield, Minn. — College students graduating this spring face one of the toughest job markets in a generation.

    Because of that, career counselors say networking with potential employers is more important than ever.

    That challenge has prompted two Minnesota colleges to become more aggressive in connecting students with alumni who could help them get that first job.

    Nate Ryan is doing his best to find a job, an internship, or anything at all, in this bleak job market. The 23-year-old graduates next month from Carleton College in Northfield.

    Ryan isn't checking classified ads for work, that's so 1990s.

    Read And Listen To The Whole Story

  • Maria Peterson '85 Selected For Kyudo Archery World Cup

    May 7, 2010

    It took her 16 years of discipline and hard practice, but only a handful of people in the world can say they’ve done what Northfield native Maria Peterson accomplished last month.

    Peterson, who practices the Japanese martial art of Kyudo Archery, was one of three Americans selected to represent her country at the first Kyudo Archery World Cup. The first of its kind, the tournament pitted 20 teams from nations around the world against each other in a sport that is equal parts discipline, meditation and athleticism.

    “Kyudo,” which means “the way of the bow” in Japanese, is not necessarily about hitting a target. Instead, practitioners try to attain a zen-like level of calm and control as they fire an arrow from a seven-foot-long bow at a bull’s-eye more than 90 feet away.

    It was that mix of the philosophy and sport that drew Peterson to the activity, which originated in Japan.

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  • Ben Edwards '89 Studies Interactions Between Glaciers And Volcanoes With Support From NSF

    April 22, 2010

    Glaciovolcanoes, they're called, these rumbling mountains where the orange-red fire of magma meets the frozen blue of glaciers.

    Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano, which erupted recently, is but one of these volcanoes. Others, such as Katla, Hekla and Askja in Iceland; Edziza in British Columbia, Canada; and Mount Rainier and Mount Redoubt in the U.S., are also glaciovolcanoes: volcanoes covered by ice.

    "When an ice-covered volcano erupts, the interplay among molten magma, ice and meltwater can have catastrophic results," says Sonia Esperanca, program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF)'s Division of Earth Sciences, which funds research on glaciovolcanoes.

    In Iceland last week, scientists were well prepared for the floods, called "jökulhlaups," that can happen after a glaciovolcano blows and melts its glacial covering. The floods were followed by tons of ash ejected into the atmosphere.

    Most of the rest of the world, however, was unaware that an eruption from a small, northern island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean could freeze air transportation and stop global commerce in its tracks.

    That, say NSF-funded scientists Ben Edwards at Dickinson College and Ian Skilling at the University of Pittsburgh, is the nature of glaciovolcanoes.

    Understanding volcano-ice interactions occupies much of Edwards' and Skilling's daily lives.

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  • Larry Meinert '75 Named Congressional Science Fellow By GSA

    April 22, 2010

    An announcement from the Geological Society of America tells us that Larry Meinert '75 has been selected as the GSA-USGS Congressional Science Fellow for 2010–2011. Larry is a professor in residence in the geology department at Smith College and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Economic Geology. He earned a B.A. in geology from Carleton College and a Ph.D. in geology from Stanford University, and is recipient of the 2010 Silver Medal from the Society of Economic Geologists.

    Larry recently gave us his own version of the story: "After seven years at Smith College in Massachusetts following 22 years at Washington State University, I am moving on to 'the other Washington.'  I will be the Geological Society of America Congressional Fellow for 2010-2011. Since 2008 I have been the editor of Economic Geology, which is another full time job on top of my other three (I also run a small winery specializing in a Bordeaux blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Carmenere, and Malbec). In October, 2009 I ran my first marathon, in St. George, Utah. I finished without killing myself and was very pleased to have run sub-four hours (3:56:04)."

     Congratulations Larry!

    Read Larry's GSA Congressional Fellow Hall of Fame Profile

  • Two Carleton Geology People Awarded NSF Fellowships

    April 20, 2010

    We are proud to report that two Carleton geology majors have been awarded National Science Foundation graduate research fellowships!  The fellowships provide graduate students with three years of support worth a total of over $100,000.  The fellowships carry annual stipends of $30,000 plus a one-time allowance of $11,500 for education-related expenses.
    Among the ten winners of fellowships this year from Carleton were two Carleton geology majors:  Kristin Bergmann ’04, who is attending the California Institute of Technology and Sam Kanner ’10, who will be attending the University of California-Berkeley.

    Also, the eight honorable mentions in the competition from Carleton included geology alums Tyler Mackey and Lydia Staisch, both '08.

  • Ken Tape '99 Publishes Book Of Photos Documenting Arctic Landscape Change

    April 12, 2010

    Though it’s generally understood that any landscape changes over time—particularly as the number of people it supports increases—these changes occur over such a span of time that they go more or less unnoticed. With The Changing Arctic Landscape, photographer Ken Tape sets changes in the landscape in stark relief, pairing decades-old photos of the arctic landscape of Alaska with photos of the same scenes taken in the present.

     Read The Whole Story

  • Callen Hyland '05 Reviews Book On The History Of A Cancer Clinic

    March 22, 2010

    In 1981, history professor James Olson was diagnosed with epitheliod sarcoma and in 2000, with brain cancer. As a cancer patient, he endured radiation therapy, chemotherapy, brain surgery, and amputation of his left forearm. He uses his own ordeal as an illustrative example in Making Cancer History, a meticulous history of the institution where he was treated: the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center.

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  • Laura Veirs '97 Ranked #1 On Billboard Charts

    March 10, 2010

    Laura Veirs has had a great 2010 so far.

    The folk singer/songwriter's seventh studio album, "July Flame," recently debuted at No. 1 on Billboard's Heatseekers and Folk charts.  It has also been garnering unprecedented media attention, earning overwhelmingly positive reviews from NPR and the New York Times, among others.

    But Veirs isn't fazed by the attention. Instead, the Portland, Ore., native watches how the media hype translates into fan appreciation -- and enjoys it.

    "I haven't done much reading of the press on this record or previous ones," Veir tells Billboard.com. "But I can say that the reaction to this new album has been great in terms of turnouts at shows and general interest from the media. That's a great feeling."

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