Courses (catalog)

  • GERM 101: Elementary German

    This course stresses a firm understanding of the basic structural patterns of the German language through reading, writing, speaking, and listening drills. For students with no previous knowledge of German or for those whose test scores indicate that this is the appropriate level of placement. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · L. Butt, R. Paas
  • GERM 102: Elementary German

    Further study of the basic structural patterns of the German language. Prerequisites: German 101 or appropriate placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2015 · L. Butt, R. Paas
  • GERM 103: Intermediate German

    Completion of the study of basic structural patterns of the German language, and the reading and discussion of a longer literary work. Prerequisites: German 102 or appropriate placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2015 · L. Butt
  • GERM 140: Culture or Barbarity? The German Question

    German culture has had a profound influence on world history, but one often wonders how the culture that produced Goethe, Schiller, Luther, Beethoven, and Kant was also the source of some of the greatest atrocities of the twentieth century. We will attempt to understand the reasons for this dichotomy by considering the development of Germany within the context of Europe from Roman times to the present. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · R. Paas
  • GERM 204: Intermediate German

    Critical reading and discussion of selected German plays, short stories and/or films. Prerequisites: German 103 or appropriate placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014 · R. Paas, A. Ulmer
  • GERM 205: Berlin Program: Intermediate Composition and Conversation

    This course, taught by a native speaker, will focus on students' reading, writing, and speaking abilities. The class format will feature mainly discussions with grammar exercises interspersed as needed. Students will write frequent papers and correct these papers themselves. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 206: Composition and Conversation

    Short texts, films, video clips and other cultural materials serve as the basis for discussions of contemporary German and Austrian culture. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 207: Young Adult Literature

    The best current German-language literature for teen-aged readers treats serious topics with wit and sensitivity. These texts, many of which have won prizes, are linguistically accessible and written with flair. Readings and class discussions will be in German. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 208: German in Cultural Contexts

    In this course students continue to develop skills of narration, listening comprehension, and writing, while exploring issues of German cultural life. The theme of this year's course is "From Household Tales to Hollywood: German Fairy Tales and Their Cinematic Adaptations." This course juxtaposes some of the Grimm Brothers' most influential, fascinating, and disturbing fairy tales with their popular transformations on the screen. We will discuss the roles of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm as authors and collectors of folk tales in the nineteenth century, and explore other European and Arabic influences on the German Märchen tradition. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 209: Reading German

    This course is designed to help students make the transition to reading German texts of their own choosing in any academic discipline. May be retaken for additional credits. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent 2 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 210: Coffee and the News

    This course is intended as a refresher course for students who have completed the basic language sequence and/or taken part in the German program. Practice in writing and speaking German. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 2 credit; S/CR/NC; International Studies, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 211: German Film After 1945: German Discussion Section

    This optional discussion section for German 219 offers course participants proficient in German the opportunity to apply their background in foreign languages and cultures to the topic of German postwar film. Students will discuss and engage with original texts from various German media that complement the required course readings, such as German film reviews, print and TV interviews, literary sources or short films. We will also critique subtitles and analyze the use of idiomatic German in selected scenes. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. Corequisite: German 219. 2 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 219: "Good Bye, Lenin!" German Post War Culture, History and Politics through Film

    This course offers an introduction to German culture after 1945 through the lens of film. We will treat films over a broad range of topics, with a special emphasis on (1) the shifting angles from which filmmakers remember the Holocaust and World War II, (2) migration and multiculturalism, especially German-Turkish relations, and (3) reflections on the GDR past and on life in post-reunification Germany. The careful analysis of each film will be framed by a discussion of its socio-historical context, in order to reflect the unique manner in which cinema engages with historical, cultural and political debates. Taught in English. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015 · L. Butt
  • GERM 230: From Gutenberg to Gates: The History and Practice of Printing

    Gutenberg's invention of printing with movable type has had a far-reaching impact on the political, social, and intellectual development in the Western World. A similarly profound revolution is taking place today with the use of computers. This course focuses on the major developments in printing since 1450 against the relevant historical and social background. In addition to lectures and discussions there is a weekly "lab," in which students will gain first-hand knowledge of such techniques as woodcutting, engraving, etching, lithography, bookbinding, and papermaking. In English translation. 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 231: Damsels, Dwarfs, and Dragons: Medieval German Literature

    Around the year 1200 German poets wrote some of the most lasting works in the Western literary tradition. It was a time of courtly love and Arthurian romances, and themes vary widely from love and honor to revenge and murder. Special attention is given to the poetry of Walther von der Vogelweide and two major epics: The Nibelungenlied and Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan and Isolde. In English translation. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 254: Berlin Program: Theater in Berlin

    This course will be structured around the theater productions of the fall season in Berlin. The class will read six to eight plays from different literary and historical periods, study their historical and literary context, and also see them performed in the theater. Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 272: The Latest--Current Themes in German Literature, Film and the Media

    In this course, students will read and discuss a number of new works from the German-speaking countries that deal with important contemporary issues--the pressures of growing up and finding a job in uncertain economic times, the catastrophe of 9/11, the ever-present theme of finding love, immigrant perspectives, the challenges of aging, etc. We will examine novels and stories that deal with these topics, but also articles in magazines (Der Spiegel, Die Zeit, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung) and films, trying to understand how various genres and media differ in their approaches to our themes. At the center of our discussion there will thus be the question what forms of expression a society finds for the formulation of its most urgent challenges, and how these texts take part in the public debate. Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent (first-year students please talk to the instructor). 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · S. Leonhard
  • GERM 275: Berlin Program: Projects in the Arts

    Students will choose a topic related to German culture/politics on which they work throughout the term. The main objectives of the course are for students to speak and write in German, and to interact with native speakers and the culture at large. Possible topics are the museum culture, the significance of soccer in German society, the music scene in Berlin, a personal history project (interviews with Berliners), gay Berlin, and the role of Germany within Europe. Students will meet first as a group, then individually to discuss and improve on their work, before presenting it to the class. Prerequisites: German 103 or consent of instructor 4 credit; S/CR/NC; International Studies, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 312: Rilke and His Circle

    Rainer Maria Rilke, perhaps the foremost poet of his century, lived among a variety of artists, thinkers, and writers. Among them are Rodin, Lou Andreas-Salome, and the Worpswede group of artists. We will follow the threads of Rilke's life and poetry, and see where they lead us. The course will center on Rilke's poetry and prose fiction, but will also include correspondence, and the works of some of Rilke's associates. Class discussions and primary readings will be in German (sometimes with English translations provided); some secondary readings may be in English. Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 320: Mystery, Murder, Madness: Crime Stories in German Literature and Film

    Following a trajectory from Friedrich Schiller's crime report Der Verbrecher aus verlorener Ehre to films of the Weimar Republic such as Caligari and M, this course focuses on the rich German tradition of crime and detective stories. We will approach this genre as a literary and cinematic space where contested concepts of truth, justice, and morality emerge, and where changing notions of perception come to the fore. Conducted in German. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 351: The Age of Goethe

    The literary movements of Enlightenment, Storm and Stress, and Classicism as seen through selected works of Goethe, Schiller, Lessing and Herder. Prerequisites: German 204 or the equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Winter 2015 · L. Butt
  • GERM 354: Studies in Twentieth-Century Prose and Poetry

    An examination of the modern novella and lyric, including works by such authors as Kafka, Brecht, Hesse, Rilke, George, Hofmannsthal, Mann, Frisch, Wolf, Bäll, Frischmuth, Kaschnitz, and others, in their historical and cultural context. Prerequisites: German 204 or equivalent. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis; not offered 2014–2015
  • GERM 400: Integrative Exercise

    Examining an aspect of German literature across eras or genres. 6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015 · Staff