History 395: Senior Seminars

The History 395 teaches skills in developing and executing an independent research project.  Most 395s are thematic in nature (for example, Nationalism, Colonialism, or The Progressive Era) and have as their central focus the development of a research essay (25-30 pages) on a topic of the student’s choice within the thematic area. In addition to relevant content and theoretical perspectives, students will learn how to find and use primary sources and secondary scholarship, structure a sustained historical argument, engage in peer-critique, and draft and revise a complex piece of research and writing.

The History 395 is a required course for the major. It can also contribute to the courses in an Interest Field. Please consult with the instructor to determine the appropriate field to which the course may be applied.

If you have any questions about the History 395 Senior Seminars that are offered this year, or if you would like to suggest a theme, please contact the Chair of History (wnorth@carleton.edu) or members of the Department Curriculum Committee.

History 395s offered in 2014-15

FALL

HIST 395.00 Nations and Nationhood, Adeeb Khalid. This research seminar will investigate the phenomenon of nationhood through history. In the first half of the course, students will be introduced to the recent literature on nationhood and nationalism. They will read both theoretical and historical works. In the second half, they will prepare and present research papers using primary sources.  Requirements Met: Humanistic Inquiry and International Studies, Special Interest: Social Thought, History Field Tags: this course is thematic and will applied to the History field in which you write your final paper.

WINTER

HIST 395.00 Voyages of Understanding, Victoria Morse. This seminar will focus on historical understandings of the experience of travel. We will look at motivations for travel; ideas about place, space, and geography; contacts with people of different religions, ethnicities, and cultures; the effect of travel on individual and group identity; and representations of travel, cultural contact, and geography in texts, maps, and images. Each student will conduct an original research project leading to a 25-30 page research paper. Requirements Met: Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Rich 2, International Studies. History Field Tags: this course is thematic and will applied to the History field in which you write your final paper.

SPRING

Hist 395.01 Crime and Punishment: American Legal History 1607-1865, Serena Zabin.  Legal documents such as depositions, file papers, complaints, accusations, confessions, and laws themselves offer a fascinating window into American history. Such documents lend themselves to the study of Indian history, capitalism, family relationships, and slavery, to name only a few possible topics. This is an advanced research seminar in which students will write a 25-30 page paper based on original research. Participation in the seminar will also include some common readings that use a variety of approaches to legal history, and extensive peer reviews of research papers. Requirements Met: Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Rich 2, Intercultural Domestic Studies; Other Tag: HIST US History

HIST 395.02 The Global Cold War, David Tompkins. In the aftermath of the Second World War and through the 1980s, the United States and the Soviet Union competed for world dominance. This Cold War spawned hot wars, as well as a cultural and economic struggle for influence all over the globe. This course will look at the experience of the Cold War from the perspective of its two main adversaries, the U.S. and USSR, but will also devote considerable attention to South America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Students will write a 25 page paper based on original research. Requirements Met: Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Rich 2, International Studies; History Field Tags: this course is thematic and will applied to the History field in which you write your final paper.