Radiations

Radiations is a weekly electronic newsletter published by the Physics and Astronomy Department of Carleton College. The deadline for materials to be included in Radiations is 7:30 AM Monday of the week you would like the information to appear. Contact tfields@carleton.edu if you want to be added or removed from this mailing list.

Posts tagged with “P123 Speaker” (All posts)

    • Fridays, 6a (3:30-4:30), Olin 149 (please note room change for this week!)

      The Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to present this year’s Physics 123 series.  “What Physicists Do” is our annual series of five lectures by invited speakers, many of whom are Carleton Physics alumni.  It is intended to introduce students to a broad range of real-world physics and to give some perspective on the kinds of work done by people with a physics background.  After each presentation, please join us in the 2nd Olin student lounge for coffee & cookies, and the opportunity to talk face-to-face with the featured speaker. 

      Friday May 2nd (week 5)  

      Kelen Tuttle ’04 “"Explaining Physics to Non-Scientists"

      After graduating with a B.A in Physics from Carleton, she went on to get her M.S. in Science Journalism from Boston University.  She has worked as a Science Information Specialist at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and as the Editor-in-Chief of Symmetry Magazine. 

      Too impatient to conduct science research herself, Kelen Tuttle '04 has built a career in science journalism. She spends her days interviewing scientists, asking them all her questions and getting immediate answers--well, most of the time. In return, she shares their stories with the general public in easy-to-understand language that captures the curiosity and excitement of scientific endeavor. Kelen will talk about the wide range of roles she's undertaken at Department of Energy-funded laboratories, including running a magazine about particle physics, overseeing communications with decision-makers in Washington DC, and writing press releases and science features. She will also offer advice on how scientists can best share their research with non-scientists directly.  

    • Physics 123
      (Approx. First Half of Term)    Fridays 3:30-4:30 (6a)
      What Physicists Do
      Spring 2013
      Olin 141    1 Credit; S/CR/NC

      The Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to present “Physics 123: What Physicists Do”.  This is our annual series of five lectures by guest speakers, many of whom are Carleton alums.  The series is intended to introduce students to a broad range of real-world physics and to give some perspective on the kinds of work done by people with a physics background.  Speakers will be available for informal discussions over refreshments afterward.    Questions: Jay Tasson, Olin 337, x4418, jtasson@carleton.edu.


      The speaker for May 10th will be Jill Bingham '04.

      "Ultrasonic Wave Propagation:  Modeling and Use in Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft Parts"

    • Physics 123
      (Approx. First Half of Term)    Fridays 3:30-4:30 (6a)
      What Physicists Do
      Spring 2013
      Olin 141    1 Credit; S/CR/NC

      The Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to present “Physics 123: What Physicists Do”.  This is our annual series of five lectures by guest speakers, many of whom are Carleton alums.  The series is intended to introduce students to a broad range of real-world physics and to give some perspective on the kinds of work done by people with a physics background.  Speakers will be available for informal discussions over refreshments afterward.    Questions: Jay Tasson, Olin 337, x4418, jtasson@carleton.edu.


      The speaker for April 26th will be Amanda Babson ('98).

    • Physics 123
      (Approx. First Half of Term)    Fridays 3:30-4:30 (6a)
      What Physicists Do
      Spring 2013
      Olin 141    1 Credit; S/CR/NC

      The Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to present “Physics 123: What Physicists Do”.  This is our annual series of five lectures by guest speakers, many of whom are Carleton alums.  The series is intended to introduce students to a broad range of real-world physics and to give some perspective on the kinds of work done by people with a physics background.  Speakers will be available for informal discussions over refreshments afterward.    Questions: Jay Tasson, Olin 337, x4418, jtasson@carleton.edu.


      The speaker for May 19th will be Kevin Covey.

    • Physics 123
      (Approx. First Half of Term)    Fridays 3:30-4:30 (6a)
      What Physicists Do
      Spring 2013
      Olin 141    1 Credit; S/CR/NC

      The Department of Physics and Astronomy is pleased to present “Physics 123: What Physicists Do”.  This is our annual series of five lectures by guest speakers, many of whom are Carleton alums.  The series is intended to introduce students to a broad range of real-world physics and to give some perspective on the kinds of work done by people with a physics background.  Speakers will be available for informal discussions over refreshments afterward.    Questions: Jay Tasson, Olin 337, x4418, jtasson@carleton.edu.


      The speaker for May 12th will be Paul Grossi ('89).

    • April 27 (Friday) noon-1pm, LDC Shearer Dining Room

      Join physics students, faculty, staff and PHYS 123 speaker Jennifer Johnson for lunch at the LDC.  Meet on 3rd Olin at 11:50am for the short walk over or meet us there.

    • April 27 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm LDC 104

      As part of the PHYS 123 speaker series 'What Physicists Do' Jennifer Johnson will give the talk "The Search for the First Stars".

       

    • April 20 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC104

      As part of the PHYS 123 speaker series "What Physicis Do" Dan Lathrop will give the talk 'Quantum Turbulence'.

    • April 13 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      As part of the PHYS 123 series "What Physicists Do" John Ibele from Seagate Technology will give the talk 'A Woodworker in the World of Complex Mechatronics:  A Tale of Technical Challenges and Career Choices in the Data Storage Industry'.

    • April 6 (Friday) noon-1pm, LDC Shearer Dining Room

      Join physics students, faculty, staff and PHYS 123 speaker Daisy Raymondson for lunch at the LDC.  Meet on 3rd Olin at 11:50am for the short walk over or meet us there.

    • April 6 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      Daisy Raymondson, laser physicist with KMLabs in Boulder, CO, will give the talk "Physics and Applications of Ultrafast Laser Systems".  Everyone is invited.

    • March 30 (Friday) 1:10-2:20pm, LDC104

      Ali Tasson, medical physicist at Procure Treatment Centers,  will give the PHYS 123 talk "Zapping Cancer with Protons"  Everyone is invited.

    • speaker

      April 29 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      Keith Goetz is a scientist at the University of Minnesota with interests in a wide range of space physics fields. He is an experimentalist who measures waves and instabilities in solar system plasmas through the design, construction and flight of interesting scientific payloads in the demanding environment of space. Keith will describe a number of successful NASA and ESA space science missions - past, present and future including the STEREO mission, the Radiation Belt Storm Probes project and the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS instrument.

    • speaker

      April 22 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LCD 104

      Robert Hallock is a Distinguished professor of Physics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.  His research is in the general area of experimental Condensed Matter Physics, with an emphasis on low temperature phenomena, particularly liquid helium, liquid helium films, and solid helium.  About 40 years ago it was predicted that it might be possible for solid helium, 4He , to display some of the properties of a superfluid, thus there might be a supersolid.  Experiments in the mid to late 1970’s were negative and the prediction languished.  Then in 2004 an experiment was done that was interpreted as positive evidence for the presence of a supersolid in solid helium.  But, the interpretation has been controversial and other evidence complicates the picture.  Our experiments are conceptually different from all the others and may provide substantial evidence for superfluid behavior in solid 4He. Recent theoretical predictions, which differ substantially from the original theory of 40 years ago, are regarded as very consistent with the observations.  We will begin with a brief discussion of some of the remarkable properties of superfluid  4He and then discuss experiments on solid 4He .  The subject is a good example of how understanding of a physical system evolves, which is often nothing like the tidy stories one reads about in books.

       

    • April 15 (Friday) 1:10-2:20pm, LDC 104

      Emily Baker '01 works as a Science Planner on the Cassini mission to Saturn. She will speak about how she came to be a small part of a large, complex, and sometimes-messy mission that somehow manages to produce a wealth of beautiful data. Come for nice pictures of Saturn, stay for the juggling.

       

    • April 8 (Friday) noon-1pm, LDC Class of '51 Dining Room

      Join Physics students, faculty, staff and PHYS 123 speaker Kareem Kazkaz for lunch at the LDC.  Meet on third Olin for the sort walk over or meet us there.

    • April 8 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      Kareem Kazkaz ’95 is a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory working on neutrinos, Dark Matter, and nuclear non-proliferation. He will talk about the history of the neutrinos, what we’ve learned about them, and what we still don’t know. Along the way he will talk about impressive-sounding concepts like “neutrinoless double-beta decay”, and how they might actually explain how the sun and the moon and the Earth can possibly exist in the first place. Time and interest permitting, he will answer questions about how scientists are using neutrinos in the International Nuclear Safeguards arena.

       

    • April 23 (Friday) noon-1-pm, LDC/'51 Dining Room
      Join PHYS 123 speaker Rik Gran, physics students, faculty and staff for lunch at the LDC.  You can meet us on third Olin for the short walk over or you can meet us there.

    • April 23 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      The neutrino is the second most common particle in the Universe (after photons), by far more numerous that electrons, protons, and neutrons, yet it’s the least understood and most curious of the particles we know about.  The MINOS experiment at the Soudan Underground Lab, and the NOvA experiment, under construction at Ash River, MN, are the current and the next generation of long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.  In his talk, Rik will demonstrate what neutrino flavor oscillation is, why neutrino "flavor" oscillation is even more curious than the flavor oscillation observed for other particles (!), that the apparent neutrino mass itself is curious on the femtoscopic scale of particle physics, and might also speak to the apparent matter-antimatter asymmetry in the
      Universe on the cosmological scale.  He will develop these topics in a context that highlights how a neutrino oscillation experiment works and what particle physics experimentalists do to accomplish such experiments.

       

    • April 16 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      Steve will talk about what it is like to be an astronomer at a time when his field is moving from the ground to space.  As such, he'll start with a description of the basic data wanted (uninterrupted brightness measurements of oscillating stars) and why that data is wanted.  Then he will discuss how they solve(d) those problems working on the ground, and then how they have managed to move to space-based observations.

    • April 2 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, LDC 104

      Chuck Dennis ’79 is Vice President, Business Development, for the $5.3 billion Cardiac Rhythm Disease Management division of Medtronic, where he manages acquisitions, start-up investing, licensing and patent procurement. Mr. Dennis created the licensing business at 3M, and was Director Specialty Storage and Director New Business Ventures at Imation. Mr. Dennis practiced patent law for 15 years and was general counsel/treasurer of the consulting firm DC Associates. Mr. Dennis has a BA in Physics from Carleton College, and a JD from Northwestern University. In his talk Chuck will talk about the strong connections between physics, medical devices and patents.

       

    • May 1 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, Olin 149

      Mary Hibbs-Brenner '77 will talk about "Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers: A Materials Science and Semiconductor Physics Challenge". All are welcome and refreshments will be served after the talk.


    • April 24 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, Olin 149

      Katie Devine '02 will talk about "Conflicting Interests? Balancing Involvement in Research and Teaching". All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

    • April 17 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, Olin 149

      Michael Fleming '94 will talk about "Physics in the Design, Use, Test and Measurement of Professional Audio Equipment". All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

    • April 6 (Monday) 3:10-4:20pm, Olin 04

      Join Sara as she gives her comps talk on "Quantum Optics". Everyone is invited to attend.

    • April 10 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, Olin 149

      Doug Natelson, Associate Professor of Physics & Astronomy at Rice, will talk about "Getting Big Science Out of Nanoscale Devices". All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

    • April 3 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm, Olin 149

      Larry Price, a postdoc at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, will talk about "The Search for Gravitational Waves: What, Why and How". All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

    • May 9 (Friday) 1:10-2:10 pm, Olin 02

      Claire Pettersen '00, an engineer at the University of Wisconsin-IceCube, will give a talk about "Ice-Fishing for Neutrinos (and other tales from the South Pole)"

    • May 2 (Friday) 1:10-2:10 pm, Olin 04
      Becky Anthony '03, a graduate student at the University of MN, will give a talk about "Silicon Nanocrystals."

    • April 25 (Friday) 1:10-2:10 pm, Olin 04

      Michael Lach (class of 1990), the Officer of High School Teaching and Learning at Chicago Public Schools, will talk about "A Career In K-12 Science Education".

    • April 18 (Friday) 1:10-2:10 pm, Olin 04

      Sue Coppersmith, professor and chair of the department of physics at the University of Wisconsin, will talk about "Classical and Quantum Computers". All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

    • April 11 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm. Olin 04

      Cliff Frohlich, the Associate Dircetor of the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics, will talk about "Deep Earthquakes and the Secrets of Seismology." All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

    • P123 Speaker Craig Henke

      March 28, 2008

      April 4 (Friday) 1:10-2:10pm. Olin 04

      Craig, and alum from the class of 1997, will give his talk Observing Neutron Stars with X-ray Telescopes to Constrain the Behavior of Matter at the Highest Densities. All are welcome. Refreshments will be served after the talk.

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