Courses

Fall 2016

  • POSC 100: American Elections of 2016

    How can we understand the campaigns and results of the 2016 American elections? This course examines (1) the electoral role of parties, candidates and interest groups (2) prior "midterm" elections in U.S. history and (3) voting trends and policy results from the 2008, 2010 and 2012 elections. Students will analyze the activities and results from the 2016 General Election looking at trends in news coverage, political advertising, campaigns and candidate communication and public opinion.

    6 credit; Writing Requirement, Argument and Inquiry Seminar; offered Fall 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2016, Spring 2017 · B. Daves
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · R. Keiser, M. Freeze
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2016, Spring 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp, L. Cooper
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · G. Marfleet, T. Myint, H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 202: Parties, Interest Groups and Elections

    Examination of the American electoral system and its components: parties, interest groups and the media. The impact of parties and interests on national policy making is also explored. The course will devote special attention to the 2016 election.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2016 · M. Freeze
  • POSC 204: Media and Electoral Politics: 2016 United States Election

    Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news using our multi-year data set of content analyzed election ads and news. We study a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods to learn how political communication affects U.S. elections. Taking this course in conjunction with Political Science 328 is highly recommended. Political Science 328 will include a component on representations of foreign policy in electoral politics that contributes to our research in Political Science 204.

    6 credit; Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 218: Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States

    What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods? Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · B. Daves, M. Freeze
  • POSC 235: Game Theory: Politics and Strategy

    In politics, competition is common and cooperation is problematic. Elemental to both are the strategies that individuals, movements, parties and countries choose to achieve their goals, given what others are doing. This course introduces the basic concepts and tools of game theory—which is the formal representation of the strategic relationships of actors—to understand whether, how and when political actors get what they want. Examples from different political contexts will be used to illustrate real life examples of theoretical insights.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016 · B. Daves
  • POSC 250: Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic

    Cross-listed with POSC 350. In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2016 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 261: Power, Freedom, and Revolution

    Politics can be defined as struggle for power. However, what power means is neither self-evident nor a non-controversial issue. The course explores different definitions of power, its difference from violence and force, as well as the extent to which criticism, resistance, and freedom are intrinsic components of power. Special attention will be given to the relationship between power and revolution, especially to the difficulty of turning revolutionary violence into political representation. In the attempt to answer these questions we will read texts by Arendt and Foucault and will consider the concrete examples of the French, Soviet, and Iranian Revolutions.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 268: Global Environmental Politics and Policy

    Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · T. Myint
  • POSC 271: Constitutional Law I

    Covers American constitutional law and history from the founding to the breakdown of the constitution in secession crisis. Extensive attention will be paid to the constitutional convention and other sources of constitutional law in addition to Supreme Court cases. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2016 · K. Smith
  • POSC 282: Terrorism and Violence in World Politics

    This course will focus on the use of violence in world politics, with a specific emphasis on terrorism and crimes against humanity. The atrocities perpetrated by ISIS are the latest examples of violence targeting non-combatants. What is the strategic logic of terrorism? Why do some militant organizations resort to terror tactics but not others? What are the micro-dynamics of terrorist organizations pertaining to recruitment and indoctrination? We will tackle these questions from theoretical and empirical perspectives. We will also discuss issues such as genocides, humanitarian intervention, and the emergence of the right to protect doctrine. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 322: Neoliberalism and the New Left in Latin America*

    This seminar will examine the "post-neoliberal" politics of Latin America, beginning with a reconsideration of the market-oriented turn in the region during the 1980s and 1990s. The seminar will then focus on the rise of leftist governments as diverse as Hugo Ch├ívez' Venezuela, Evo Morales' Bolivia, and Lula da Silva's Brazil. Other topics will include the emergence of anti-neoliberal movements, the wave of indigenous politics, new social movements, environmental politics, and experiments with anti-poverty programs throughout Latin America. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2016 · A. Montero
  • POSC 328: Foreign Policy Analysis*

    Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 350: Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic*

    Cross-listed with POSC 250. In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2016 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 361: Approaches to Development*

    The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends? 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · T. Myint
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp, G. Marfleet, L. Cooper, B. Allen, T. Myint, A. Montero, H. Bou Nassif, R. Keiser

Winter 2017

  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · R. Keiser, M. Freeze
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · G. Marfleet, T. Myint, H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 212: Environmental Justice

    The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2017 · K. Smith
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · B. Daves, M. Freeze
  • POSC 231: American Foreign Policy

    An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy. Prerequisites: Political Science 122, AP American Government, or AP US History is highly recommended 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 237: Southeast Asian Politics

    This course will cover key thematic issues of Southeast Asian politics, including the challenges of democracy, regional integration, environmental politics, the rise of the power of non-state actors, and struggles for citizen-sovereignty of the people. We will examine these frontier issues against the background of Southeast Asia's societal evolution through kingdoms, colonial eras, emergence of nation-states, and the influence of globalization on politics. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · T. Myint
  • POSC 245: Politics of the Middle East I (1918-67)

    This course covers the colonial and early post-colonial period of Middle East history and politics. When the Ottoman Empire collapsed in 1918, France and Britain redrew the map of the region drastically, and new states such as Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon were carved out of old Ottoman provinces. Since this formative period the quest for stability in the Middle East has proved elusive. Many ills still plaguing the region today find their roots in the dynamics of the era under study. The main goal of the course is to explore the historical origins of current Middle East politics. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 254: Freedom, Excellence, Happiness: Aristotle's Ethics

    Cross-listed with POSC 354. What does it mean to be morally excellent? To be politically excellent? To be intellectually and spiritually excellent? Are these things mutually compatible? Do they lie within the reach of everyone? And what is the relation between excellence and pleasure? Between excellence and happiness? Aristotle addresses these questions in intricate and illuminating detail in the Nicomachean Ethics, which we will study in this course. The Ethics is more accessible than some of Aristotle's other works. But it is also a multifaceted and multi-layered book, and one that reveals more to those who study it with care.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2017 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 255: Post-Modern Political Thought

    The thought and practice of the modern age have been found irredeemably oppressive, alienating, dehumanizing, and/or exhausted by a number of leading philosophic thinkers in recent years. In this course we will explore the critiques and alternative visions offered by a variety of post-modern thinkers, including Nietzsche (in many ways the first post-modern), Heidegger, Foucault, and Derrida. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 265: Capitalist Crises, Power, and Policy

    This course examines the interaction of national politics and international economic activity. Topics include the relationship between national and international finance, global competitiveness, and economic development. Case studies drawn from every continent. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · A. Montero
  • POSC 266: Urban Political Economy

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2017 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 285: Intelligence, Policy, and Conflict

    This course will study the U.S. Intelligence Community and how intelligence complements policy development and supports the creation and implementation of national security and foreign policy strategy. Using case studies, we will examine forms of conflict and assess how intelligence supported or failed policymakers in the areas of conventional warfare, counterinsurgency, and counterterrorism. We will conclude with the study of asymmetric warfare in our modern age.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · J. Olson
  • POSC 320: Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Middle East*

    This course analyzes theories of authoritarianism and prospects for democratization in the Middle East. The course is divided into three sections: the first covers the main theoretical perspectives explaining the persistence of authoritarian rule in the Middle East. The second is devoted to the events of the Arab Spring, with an emphasis on Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia. Finally, the third section deals with two of the most pressing issues facing the countries of the Arab Spring: 1) the political role of Arab armed forces, 2) the integration of the long-banned Islamist groups into the public sphere as legitimate political parties. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 330: The Complexity of Politics*

    Theories of complexity and emergence relate to how large-scale collective properties and characteristics of a system can arise from the behavior and attributes of component parts. This course explores the relevance of these concepts, studied mainly in physics and biology, for the social sciences. Students will explore agent-based modeling to discover emergent properties of social systems through computer simulations they create using NetLogo software. Reading and seminar discussion topics include conflict and cooperation, electoral competition, transmission of culture and social networks. Completion of the stats/methods sequence is highly recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2017 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 352: Political Theory of Alexis de Tocqueville*

    This course will be devoted to close study of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, which has plausibly been described as the best book ever written about democracy and the best book every written about America. Tocqueville uncovers the myriad ways in which equality, including especially the passion for equality, determines the character and the possibilities of modern humanity. Tocqueville thereby provides a political education that is also an education toward self-knowledge. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2017 · B. Allen
  • POSC 354: Freedom, Excellence, Happiness: Aristotle's Ethics*

    Cross-listed with POSC 254. What does it mean to be morally excellent? To be politically excellent? To be intellectually and spiritually excellent? Are these things mutually compatible? Do they lie within the reach of everyone? And what is the relation between excellence and pleasure? Between excellence and happiness? Aristotle addresses these questions in intricate and illuminating detail in the Nicomachean Ethics, which we will study in this course. The Ethics is more accessible than some of Aristotle's other works. But it is also a multifaceted and multi-layered book, and one that reveals more to those who study it with care. Seminar paper required.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2017 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 355: Identity, Culture and Rights*

    This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · B. Allen
  • POSC 366: Urban Political Economy*

    Cross-listed with POSC 266. City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? A research paper will be required.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp, G. Marfleet, L. Cooper, B. Allen, T. Myint, A. Montero, H. Bou Nassif, R. Keiser

Spring 2017

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2016, Spring 2017 · B. Daves
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · R. Keiser, M. Freeze
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2016, Spring 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp, L. Cooper
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · G. Marfleet, T. Myint, H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 214: Visual Representations of Political Thought and Action

    Visual media offer an alternative method of framing political ideas and events. Images found in such texts as film, posters, and even in statistical tables can enlighten--or mislead. Readings in visual theory, political psychology, and graphic representation will enable you to read images and use these powerful media to convey your ideas and research.

    3 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2017 · B. Allen
  • POSC 221: Latin American Politics

    Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in selected Latin American countries. Attention is focused on general problems and patterns of development, with some emphasis on U.S.-Latin American relations. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2017 · A. Montero
  • POSC 226: Political Psychology

    This course is an introduction to political psychology, an inter-disciplinary field of study that applies psychological theory and research to the study of politics, as a theoretical alternative to rational choice models. Study will include applying psychological models to elite decision making and to political behavior of ordinary citizens. Topics include personality and political leadership, group processes and foreign policy, theories of information processing and elite decision making, malignant political aggression and punitive politics, altruism and heroic political action, etc. in light of important political issues and events. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2017 · M. Freeze
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5) 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · B. Daves, M. Freeze
  • POSC 246: Politics of the Middle East II (1967-2011)

    The course covers the major political events in the Middle East between 1967 and 2011, including the continuation of the Arab-Israeli conflict, the 1973 war and its aftermath, and the rise of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) in Arab politics. We will also probe the upsurge of political Islam with special emphasis on the Muslim Brothers in Egypt and Hezbollah in Lebanon. In addition, the course covers the crises of the Arab authoritarian order in the last two decades leading to the Arab 2011 uprising, failure to foster economic development, and the consequences on Arab societies in the Middle East. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2017 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 333: Global Social Changes and Sustainability*

    This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2017 · T. Myint
  • POSC 359: Cosmopolitanism*

    Stoic philosophers saw themselves as citizens of the world (cosmopolitans). In the eighteenth century, Kant thought that the increasingly global nature of the world requires international political institutions to guarantee peace and human rights. After the Cold War cosmopolitanism was back in fashion. Even the favorite drink of the girls on TV's Sex and the City was called Cosmopolitan. This course explores different meanings of cosmopolitanism: moral, political, and cultural. The intention is to show that cosmopolitanism is a complex reality that requires political institutions, as well as a new ethics to be cultivated through a particular engagement of culture. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Spring 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · M. Czobor-Lupp, G. Marfleet, L. Cooper, B. Allen, T. Myint, A. Montero, H. Bou Nassif, R. Keiser