Courses

Fall 2014

  • POSC 100: American Elections of 2014

    How can we understand the campaigns and results of the 2014 American elections? This course examines (1) the electoral role of parties, candidates and interest groups (2) prior "midterm" elections in U.S. history and (3) voting trends and policy results from the 2008, 2010 and 2012 elections. Students will perform post-election analysis of 2014 U.S. House, Senate, state gubernatorial and state legislative elections by examining exit polls and election results. These oral reports will serve as the basis for the final examination.  6 credit; Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2014 · S. Schier
  • POSC 120: Comparative Political Regimes

    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · D. Gupta, K. Freeze, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2014, Spring 2015 · L. Cooper, M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · T. Myint, H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 207: Urban Politics in a Global Era

    Are cities microcosms of state or nation? How has the role of immigrant-port-of-entry affected the politics of cities? What has been the impact of population shift to the suburbs? Are African-Americans and Latinos fighting over an inconsequential hole-in-the-doughnut in Chicago and Los Angeles? What is the significance of living wage and gay rights movements in cities? Why do European and American cities seem so different, and are there signs of convergence in the era of globalization?  6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 241: Ethnic Conflict

    Ethnic conflict is a persistent and troubling challenge for those interested in preserving international peace and stability. By one account, ethnic violence has claimed more than ten million lives since 1945, and in the 1990s, ethnic conflicts comprised nearly half of all ongoing conflicts around the world. In this course, we will attempt to understand the conditions that contribute to ethnic tensions, identify the triggers that lead to escalation, and evaluate alternative ideas for managing and solving such disputes. The course will draw on a number of cases, including Rwanda, Bosnia, and Northern Ireland. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 248: The U.S.-China Relationship

    This course will examine the interaction between China and America from the inception in the late eighteenth century to the present, with greater emphasis on more recent events. The focus will be on evaluating the underlying and persisting factors which have made Sino-U.S. relations so special and difficult. 3 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · B. Levin
  • POSC 250: Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic

    Cross-listed with POSC 350. In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2014 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 268: Global Environmental Politics and Policy

    Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. Prerequisites: none 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · T. Myint
  • POSC 271: Constitutional Law I

    Covers American constitutional law and history from the founding to the breakdown of the constitution in secession crisis. Extensive attention will be paid to the constitutional convention and other sources of constitutional law in addition to Supreme Court cases. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2014 · K. Smith
  • POSC 274: Political Psychology of Presidential Foreign Policy Decision Making

    This course examines the intersection of politics, personality and social psychology as applied to the analysis of U.S. foreign policy. It investigates the impact of individuals, group processes, political and social cognition, and political context on foreign policy decision-making. It explores questions such as: How do personalities of political leaders affect decision-making? How do processes of group decision making affect outcomes? How do individual differences in social and political perception shape elite decision-making? Case studies will be drawn from major episodes in U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War and post-Cold War era. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 332: Religion and Politics*

    In this class, we will investigate the relationship between politics and religion around the world. It is not a class on theology or belief systems. Instead, we will focus on describing and explaining how religious beliefs and organizations affect political outcomes and vice-versa. Topics will include the relationship between religion and the state, the political dimensions of religious movements, the religious dimensions of political movements, and how religious perspectives on such issues as gender, sexuality, race, and war reinforce or clash with political values and policy.  6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 334: Global Public Health*

    This seminar covers a variety of public health issues in advanced capitalist and developing countries, including communicable diseases, neglected tropical diseases and scourges such as malaria, dengue, and AIDS, the effectiveness of foreign aid, and the challenges of reforming health care systems. Emphasis will be on how these issues interact with patterns of economic and social development and the capacity of states and international regimes. Students will develop a perspective on public policy using materials from diverse fields such as political science, epidemiology, history, economics, and sociology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · A. Montero
  • POSC 337: Political Economy of Happiness*

    This course explores the political determinants of happiness in the United States and around the world. What makes citizens happier in one country compared to another? When might political institutions be most successful at producing happiness among people? What is the relationship between economic inequality, development, redistribution and happiness? The course starts by examining how happiness is conceptualized and measured in public opinion data, before exploring the political economy of happiness globally. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 350: Ancient Political Philosophy: Plato's Republic*

    Cross-listed with POSC 250. In this course we will examine ancient political philosophy through the intensive study of Plato's Republic, perhaps the greatest work of political philosophy ever written. What is morality? Why should a person behave morally? Wouldn't it be more satisfying to be a tyrant? What is the best way of life? What would a perfect society look like? What would be its customs and institutions, and who would rule? What would it demand of us, and would that price be worth paying? These are some of the politically (and personally) vital questions addressed by the book. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2014 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 361: Approaches to Development*

    The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends? 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · T. Myint
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · Staff

Winter 2015

  • POSC 120: Comparative Political Regimes

    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · D. Gupta, K. Freeze, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · T. Myint, H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 211: Environment and the Evolution of Rules: Designing Institutions to Solve Political Problems

    How can we design democratic institutions to deal with environmental and social problems? Are there universal approaches to solving political problems in physically and socially diverse communities? Do people come up with different institutional ways to address shared problems because of environmental or cultural differences? By examining basic principles of institutional design you will learn how to analyze constitutions, public policies, international treaties, and other "rule ordered relationships" that different people have created to deal with environmental concerns and, generally, the health and welfare of their communities. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · B. Allen
  • POSC 212: Environmental Justice

    The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2015 · K. Smith
  • POSC 221: Latin American Politics

    Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in selected Latin American countries. Attention is focused on general problems and patterns of development, with some emphasis on U.S.-Latin American relations. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · A. Montero
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 231: American Foreign Policy

    An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy. Prerequisites: Political Science 122 highly recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · S. Schier
  • POSC 245: Contemporary Politics of the Middle East (1918-1967)

    This course covers the colonial and early post-colonial period of Middle East history and politics. When the Ottoman Empire collapsed in 1918, France and Britain redrew the map of the region drastically, and new states such as Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon were carved out of old Ottoman provinces. Since this formative period the quest for stability in the Middle East has proved elusive. Many ills still plaguing the region today find their roots in the dynamics of the era under study. The main goal of the course is to explore the historical origins of current Middle East politics. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 256: Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil

    Crosslisted with POSC 350 Nietzsche understood himself to be living at a moment of great endings: the exhaustion of modernity, the self-undermining of rationalism, the self-overcoming of morality--in short, and most stunningly, the "death of God." Nietzsche both foresaw and tried to accelerate these endings. But he also tried to bring about a new beginning, a culture that he believed would be life-affirming and life-enhancing. In this course we will engage in a close study of Beyond Good and Evil, perhaps Nietzsche's most beautiful book and probably his most political one. Selections from some of his other books will also be assigned. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 265: Capitalist Crises, Power, and Policy

    This course examines the interaction of national politics and international economic activity. Topics include the relationship between national and international finance, global competitiveness, and economic development. Case studies drawn from every continent. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 266: Urban Political Economy

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2015 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 278: Memory and Politics

    The ways in which human societies narrate their past can powerfully impact their politics. It can enhance their capacity to be just or it can undermine it. The fashion in which history is told can help societies avoid conflict and it can heal the lingering memory of previous wars. At the same time, historical narratives can escalate violence and deepen socio-cultural and political divisions, inequality, and oppression. In this course we will learn about the various connections between history and politics by reading the works of G. W. F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, Hannah Arendt, and Paul Ricoeur. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 330: The Complexity of Politics*

    Theories of complexity and emergence relate to how large-scale collective properties and characteristics of a system can arise from the behavior and attributes of component parts. This course explores the relevance of these concepts, studied mainly in physics and biology, for the social sciences. Students will explore agent-based modeling to discover emergent properties of social systems through computer simulations they create using NetLogo software. Reading and seminar discussion topics include conflict and cooperation, electoral competition, transmission of culture and social networks. Completion of the stats/methods sequence is highly recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2015 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 350: Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil*

    Cross-listed with POSC 256. Nietzsche understood himself to be living at a moment of great endings: the exhaustion of modernity, the self-undermining of rationalism, the self-overcoming of moralityin short, and most stunningly, the "death of God." Nietzsche both foresaw and tried to accelerate these endings. But he also tried to bring about a new beginning, a culture that he believed would be life-affirming and life-enhancing. In this course we will engage in a close study of Beyond Good and Evil, perhaps Nietzsche's most beautiful book and probably his most political one. Selections from some of his other books will also be assigned. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 366: Urban Political Economy*

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? A research paper will be required. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 378: Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Social Changes in Southeast Asia

    Informed by the assigned readings, students will visit markets, factories, farms, and various cultural and natural sites to see first-hand the changes and challenges occurring in these areas. The course covers: (1) issues of livelihood transition from rural to urban; (2) the interaction between market systems and social relations; and (3) the impact on society of changes in physical infrastructures such as roads and telecommunication. Students will keep a journal and produce three thematic short essays, a 15-20-minute video, or a well-organized blog to document their learning. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · T. Myint, Local Faculty
  • POSC 379: Political Econ & Ecology of S.E. Asia: Diversity of Social Ecological Systems in Southeast Asia

    Connecting the first and the second components, this course examines key actors, issues, and interests in the political economy of and ecology of Southeast Asia. Students will connect economy to ecology in Southeast Asia by connecting field experiences and observation to real data, facts, and cases that illustrate the interaction between economy and ecology. This course requires students to identify a topic of interest based on their field experience, research it using techniques taught in the field research and methods course, and write a research report in the form of a term paper.  6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · T. Myint
  • POSC 392: Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Field Research Experiences and Methods

    This course provides a comparative field research experiences for students. Students will carry out a project involving a combination of research techniques including questionnaires, interviews, and participant observation. Students will learn to develop quantitative reasoning and qualitative analyses based on field experiences. Students will write a short paper reflecting on their experience doing field research and present their findings to the class. An alternative assignment is to write a descriptive paper for a global audience to be published on Wikipedia. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2015 · T. Myint
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · Staff

Spring 2015

  • POSC 120: Comparative Political Regimes

    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · D. Gupta, K. Freeze, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2014, Spring 2015 · L. Cooper, M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · T. Myint, H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 208: The American Presidency

    A study of the contemporary presidency, with a focus on the development of the institutional presidency, presidential personality, and the presidency's relations with other institutions in the American and international political systems. Particular attention will be devoted to the presidencies of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2015 · S. Schier
  • POSC 218: Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States

    What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods? Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2015 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 232: Chinese Foreign Policy

    The "Rise of China" over the past 35 years presents challenges and opportunities for the United States and other countries around the world. This course examines China's growing and changing influence in the world.  The course starts by exploring historical Chinese foreign policy, from Imperial China through the Cold War. The course then examines a variety of different theories and factors explaining the general nature of China's foreign policy. The course concludes by detailing China's current bilateral relationships with specific countries and regions around the world. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 236: Global, National and Human Security

    What are the greatest threats to national and global security? In this course we will explore a range of traditional security topics including: the proliferation of WMDs, terrorism, piracy, insurgencies, arms races, territorial disputes and strategic rivalries. In addition to these classic concerns, we also consider newer ones such as cyber-security, the threat of global pandemics, unmanned warfare and the impact of climate change. Our study begins and concludes with the debate over the concept of security in the twenty-first century. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 255: Post-Modern Political Thought

    The thought and practice of the modern age have been found irredeemably oppressive, alienating, dehumanizing, and/or exhausted by a number of leading philosophic thinkers in recent years. In this course we will explore the critiques and alternative visions offered by a variety of post-modern thinkers, including Nietzsche (in many ways the first post-modern), Heidegger, Foucault, and Derrida. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Spring 2015 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 258: Politics and Ambition

    Is personal ambition a threat to peace and the public good or is it a prod to nobility and heroism? Does it exemplify the opposition between self and society or does it represent their intersection and mutual support­--or both? Drawing on literary, philosophical, and historical works this course will take up these and other questions as part of a broad examination of the role of ambition in politics.  6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Spring 2015 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 282: Humanitarian Intervention and International Law

    This course is about crimes against humanity--e.g., genocide, apartheid, torture--and the dilemmas they pose in international law. When autocrats perpetrate crimes against humanity, should outside forces interfere to stop them? There is no easy answer to this question. Sanctifying the concepts of national sovereignty and non-interference leaves vulnerable civilian populations at the mercy of tyrants; but sanctioning outside interference and ignoring national sovereignties, facilitates foreign interventionism and threatens the political independence of small nations. We will tackle this question, and pay special attention to the emergence and logic of the responsibility to protect doctrine. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 283: Separatist Movements

    This course explores the emergence and resolution of separatist movements around the world. While separatist movements are often associated with the violent dissolution of states, not all separatist movements result in violence and not all separatist movements seek independence. We will investigate the conditions under which separatist pressures are most likely to develop and when such pressures result in actual separation. We will contrast the tactics of movements, from peaceful approaches in places like contemporary Quebec or Scotland, to peaceful outcomes like the "velvet divorce" of Czechoslovakia, to violent insurrections in places like the Philippines, Spain, and Northern Ireland. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 286: A Comparative Study of the Vietnam and Iraqi Wars

    The course will examine America's wars in Vietnam and Iraq. The similarities and differences between these conflicts will be analyzed in an effort to determine the influences that shape America's decision to go to war. 3 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · B. Levin
  • POSC 320: Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Middle East*

    This course analyzes theories of authoritarianism and prospects for democratization in the Middle East. The course is divided into three sections: the first covers the main theoretical perspectives explaining the persistence of authoritarian rule in the Middle East. The second is devoted to the events of the Arab Spring, with an emphasis on Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia. Finally, the third section deals with two of the most pressing issues facing the countries of the Arab Spring: 1) the political role of Arab armed forces, 2) the integration of the long-banned Islamist groups into the public sphere as legitimate political parties. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 359: Cosmopolitanism*

    Stoic philosophers saw themselves as citizens of the world (cosmopolitans). In the 18th century, Kant thought that the increasingly global nature of the world requires international political institutions to guarantee peace and human rights. After the Cold War cosmopolitanism was back in fashion. Even the favorite drink of the girls on TV’s Sex and the City was called Cosmopolitan. This course explores different meanings of cosmopolitanism: moral, political, and cultural. The intention is to show that cosmopolitanism is a complex reality that requires political institutions, as well as a new ethics to be cultivated through a particular engagement of culture. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Spring 2015 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · Staff