Courses

Fall 2015

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · D. Gupta, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 150: The Political Thought of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movemen

    What justifies self-defense and retaliation in defending civil rights and liberty? What moral reasoning and strategies offer alternatives to using physical violence in a social movement to gain civil rights? Our seminar examines the American Civil Rights Movement 1954 and 1968, and compares the writings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X to learn about nonviolent direct action, self-defense, and the use of "any means necessary" to right the wrongs of racial injustice. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015 · B. Allen
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2015, Spring 2016 · L. Cooper, M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · H. Bou Nassif, T. Myint
  • POSC 201: Lobbyists, Wonks and Social Media: Public Policy Making in Democracy

    This course explores the process of policy making in the United States. We will also explore the diffusion of U.S. policy ideas and technology across the globe. The effectiveness of elected officials, lobbyists, idea entrepreneurs, and grass roots activists will be contrasted; techniques of agenda setting and agenda denial will be emphasized. Students from all majors interested in careers in public policy are welcome. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 224: Measuring and Evaluating Social and Ecological Systems

    The Institutional Analysis and Development (IAD) and Social Ecological Systems (SES) Frameworks are designed to provide data on social, economic, and political institutions and the physical environment in such a way that we can understand the reciprocal effects of institutional and environmental change. We will learn these frameworks and the methods used to measure changes in various natural resource systems. Our focus in 2015 will be on the measurement of forests and the microclimates produced by trees in, for example, urban areas. 3 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · B. Allen
  • POSC 225: Global-Local Commons: Sustainability, Diversity & Self-Gov't in Complex Social-Ecological Systems

    This course introduces students to the study of commons (common pool resources and common property), particularly natural resources commons. The dilemmas of commons governance often reveal links between "governments" and "governance" as well as the global stakes of bettering local livelihoods. Our 2015 focus is on social and ecological systems (SES) linked directly with climate change, including forests and water resources. Students are strongly encouraged to take the five-week accompanying lab, POSC 224 Measuring and Evaluating Social and Ecological Systems. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · B. Allen
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only. Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2015 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 231: American Foreign Policy

    An introduction to the actors and processes of American foreign policymaking and to the substance of American foreign policy. The course aims to provide students with an understanding of how knowledge of the past, the global policy environment, the processes of foreign policymaking, and the specifics of a foreign policy issue come together to help determine modern American foreign policy. The course will review the structure of the international system of states, state power and interests, the historical context of American foreign policy, actors in American foreign affairs, models of foreign policy decision making, and the instruments of foreign policy. Prerequisites: POSC 122 or AP American Government or AP US History highly recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · S. Schier
  • POSC 251: Modern Political Philosophy: Science and Humanity

    Crossl-listed with POSC 371. The modern age has been characterized by the unprecedented advance of natural science and the attempt to achieve technological mastery of nature. How did this come about? What worldview does this express, and how does that worldview affect the way we live and think? We will investigate these questions by studying classic works by some of modernity's philosophic founders (including Bacon, Descartes, and Hobbes) and some of its most penetrating interpreters and critics (including Jonathan Swift and Nietzsche). 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 266: Urban Political Economy

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 268: Global Environmental Politics and Policy

    Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · T. Myint
  • POSC 276: Imagination in Politics

    The course explores the bipolarity of imagination, the fact that imagination can be both a source of freedom and domination in contemporary politics. The main focus of the course is the capacity literature and film have to either increase the autonomous capacity of individuals to engage culture and language in a creative and interactive manner in the construction of their identities, or in a direction that increases their fascination with images and myths and, consequently, the escapist desire to pull these out of the living dialogue with others. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 313: Legal Issues in Higher Education

    This seminar will explore pressing legal and policy issues facing American colleges and universities. The course will address the ways core academic values (e.g., academic freedom; the creation and maintenance of a community based on shared values) fit or conflict with legal rules and political dynamics that operate beyond the academy. Likely topics include how college admissions are shaped by legal principles, with particular emphasis on debates over affirmative action; on-campus speech; faculty tenure; intellectual property; student rights and student discipline (including discipline for sexual assault); and college and university relations with the outside world. 3 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2015 · S. Poskanzer
  • POSC 328: Foreign Policy Analysis*

    Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2015 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 338: Politics of Inequality and Poverty*

    The unequal distribution of income and assets is arguably the most important issue in many political systems around the world, and debates over the appropriate role of government in fighting inequality form a primary dimension of political competition. In this course, we will explore the politics surrounding economic inequality around the world. We will discuss how inequality influences political participation in democracies and dictatorships, shapes prospects for democratic transition/consolidation, and affects economic growth and social well-being. We will also examine when and how political institutions can mitigate negative aspects of inequality. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 358: Comparative Social Movements*

    This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 361: Approaches to Development*

    The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends? 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · T. Myint
  • POSC 371: Modern Political Philosophy: Science and Humanity*

    Cross-listed with POSC 251. The modern age has been characterized by the unprecedented advance of natural science and the attempt to achieve technological mastery of nature. How did this come about? What worldview does this express, and how does that worldview affect the way we live and think? We will investigate these questions by studying classic works by some of modernity's philosophic founders (including Bacon, Descartes, and Hobbes) and some of its most penetrating interpreters and critics (including Jonathan Swift and Nietzsche). 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · Staff

Winter 2016

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · D. Gupta, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 203: Political Communication: Political Advertising in Elections and Public Policy

    Crosslisted with POSC 303. How does political advertising influence the electorate? How does political advertising influence our understanding of policy proposals? Election ads along with the 6-second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. Add to these forms a battery of visual "arguments" seen in news media, film, and paid ads aimed at persuading us to adopt various policy positions. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. Our policy focus for 2016 will be on climate change and the 2016 general election. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 220: Politics and Political History in Film

    How do representations of politics in film influence our ideas about governance, citizenship, power, and authority? How do film and TV reflect values and beliefs of democratic society, particularly in the United States? These are two questions that we will consider in the course as we study films representing politics and historical events in fiction and non-fiction genres for entertainment and education. Films to be analyzed include: Battle of Algiers, Fog of War, Cape Fear (1963), Manchurian Candidate (1960), Advise and Consent, All the President's Men, Primary, War Room, The Mushroom Club, Fahrenheit 9/11, When the Levees Broke. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 237: Southeast Asian Politics

    This course will cover key thematic issues of Southeast Asian politics, including the challenges of democracy, regional integration, environmental politics, the rise of the power of non-state actors, and struggles for citizen-sovereignty of the people. We will examine these frontier issues against the background of Southeast Asia's societal evolution through kingdoms, colonial eras, emergence of nation-states, and the influence of globalization on politics. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · T. Myint
  • POSC 238: Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football

    This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · B. Carlson
  • POSC 245: Politics of the Middle East I (1918-67)

    This course covers the colonial and early post-colonial period of Middle East history and politics. When the Ottoman Empire collapsed in 1918, France and Britain redrew the map of the region drastically, and new states such as Iraq, Syria, Jordan, and Lebanon were carved out of old Ottoman provinces. Since this formative period the quest for stability in the Middle East has proved elusive. Many ills still plaguing the region today find their roots in the dynamics of the era under study. The main goal of the course is to explore the historical origins of current Middle East politics. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 259: Justice Among Nations

    Crosslisted with POSC 349. The purpose of this course is to bring to bear great works of political philosophy on the foundational questions of international politics. Our primary text will be Thucydides' gripping history of The Peloponnesian War. Thucydides was perhaps the greatest thinker about international relations that the world has seen. He was also a political philosopher--and psychologist--of the first rank. His book teaches much not only about politics but about human nature. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2016 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 264: Politics of Contemporary China

    This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 265: Capitalist Crises, Power, and Policy

    This course examines the interaction of national politics and international economic activity. Topics include the relationship between national and international finance, global competitiveness, and economic development. Case studies drawn from every continent. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 267: Comparative Foreign Policy

    Why do states act the way they do internationally? Why do some states act like "rogues" while others support the system? How do countries choose their allies or enemies? How do governments define their country's national interest and respond to global changes? Foreign policy is where internal politics and external politics intersect. Understanding any country's foreign policy requires that we pay attention to its position in the international system and its internal politics. In this course we will employ approaches from international relations and comparative politics to explore these questions across a range of countries. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 272: Constitutional Law II

    Covers American constitutional law and history from Reconstruction to the contemporary era. Extensive attention will be paid to the effort to refound the American constitution following the Civil War as manifest in the thirteenth, fourteenth, and fifteenth amendments, and to the successive transformations which the Supreme Court worked in the new constitutional order. Political Science 271 is not a prerequisite. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2016 · K. Smith
  • POSC 277: Religion in Politics: Conflict or Dialogue?

    The course explores the relationship between religion and politics, especially in multicultural societies where believers and nonbelievers alike must live together. The leading question of the course is if religion is a source of violence, as seems to be so much the case in the world today, or if it can enter the public sphere in ways that educate and enhance the sensibility and ability of modern individuals to live with radically different others. In the attempt to answer these questions we will read, among others, from the writings of Kant, Habermas, Herder, Derrida, Ricoeur, Taylor, and Zizek. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 303: Political Communication: Political Advertising in Elections and Public Policy*

    Crosslisted with POSC 203.  How does political advertising influence the electorate? How does political advertising influence our understanding of policy proposals? Election ads along with the 6-second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. Add to these forms a battery of visual "arguments" seen in news media, film, and paid ads aimed at persuading us to adopt various policy positions. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. Our policy focus for 2016 will be on climate change and the 2016 general election. Students enrolled in the 303 version will conduct more extensive analysis of data for their seminar papers. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 349: Justice Among Nations

    Crosslisted with POSC 259. The purpose of this course is to bring to bear great works of political philosophy on the foundational questions of international politics.  Our primary text will be Thucydides gripping History of The Peloponnesian War. Thucydides was perhaps the greatest thinker about international relations that the world has seen. He was also a political philosopher--and psychologist--of the first rank. His book teaches much not only about politics but about human nature. Students enrolled in the 359 version will complete a more detailed and longer seminar paper that may be the basis for comps in a subsequent term. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2016 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · Staff

Spring 2016

  • POSC 120: Democracy and Dictatorship

    An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · D. Gupta, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2015, Spring 2016 · L. Cooper, M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 212: Environmental Justice

    The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2016 · K. Smith
  • POSC 246: Politics of the Middle East II (1967-2011)

    The course covers the major political events in the Middle East between 1967 and 2011, including the continuation of the Arab-Israeli conflict, the 1973 war and its aftermath, and the rise of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) in Arab politics. We will also probe the upsurge of political Islam with special emphasis on the Muslim Brothers in Egypt and Hezbollah in Lebanon. In addition, the course covers the crises of the Arab authoritarian order in the last two decades leading to the Arab 2011 uprising, failure to foster economic development, and the consequences on Arab societies in the Middle East. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 247: Comparative Nationalism

    Nationalism is an ideology that political actors have frequently harnessed to support a wide variety of policies ranging from intensive economic development to genocide. But what is nationalism? Where does it come from? And what gives it such emotional and political power? This course investigates competing ideas about the sources of nationalism, its evolution, and its political uses in state building, legitimation, development, and war. We will consider both historic examples of nationalism, as well as contemporary cases drawn from Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the United States. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 284: War and Peace in Northern Ireland

    This class examines the decades-long conflict in Northern Ireland between Catholics and Protestants known as "The Troubles." We will investigate the causes of violence in this region and explore the different phases of the conflict, including initial mobilization of peaceful protestors, radicalization into violent resistance, and de-escalation. We will also consider the international dimensions of the conflict and how groups forged transnational ties with diaspora groups and separatist movements around the world. Finally, we will explore the consequences of this conflict on present-day Northern Ireland's politics and identify lessons from the peace process for other societies in conflict. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 286: The Vietnam War with Reflections on Iraq and Afghanistan

    The course will examine America's wars in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. The similarities and differences between these conflicts will be analyzed in an effort to determine the influences that shape America's decision to go to war. 3 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · B. Levin
  • POSC 288: Washington D.C.: A Global Conversation Part I

    Students will participate in a seminar involving meetings with leading Washington figures in areas of global policy making and regular discussions of related readings. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 289: Washington D.C. Seminar: A Global Conversation Part II

    Students will engage with leading scholars and practitioners in the field of political communication to learn how mass media, particularly TV news, influences politics. We will be especially attentive to United States news coverage of international events in new and old media and its importance in international relations, domestic perceptions of global political concerns (e.g. climate change and universal declarations of human rights). Our seminar readings will draw on research in political psychology and democratic theory. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 293: Washington D.C. Seminar: Global Conservation Internship

    6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2016 · B. Allen
  • POSC 320: Authoritarianism and Democratization in the Middle East*

    This course analyzes theories of authoritarianism and prospects for democratization in the Middle East. The course is divided into three sections: the first covers the main theoretical perspectives explaining the persistence of authoritarian rule in the Middle East. The second is devoted to the events of the Arab Spring, with an emphasis on Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia. Finally, the third section deals with two of the most pressing issues facing the countries of the Arab Spring: 1) the political role of Arab armed forces, 2) the integration of the long-banned Islamist groups into the public sphere as legitimate political parties. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · H. Bou Nassif
  • POSC 333: Global Social Changes and Sustainability*

    This course is about the relationship between social changes and ecological changes to understand and to be able to advance analytical concepts, research methods, and theories of society-nature interactions. How do livelihoods of individuals and groups change over time and how do the changes affect ecological sustainability? What are the roles of human institutions in ecological sustainability? What are the roles of ecosystem dynamics in institutional sustainability? Students will learn fundamental theories and concepts that explain linkages between social change and environmental changes and gain methods and skills to measure social changes qualitatively and quantitatively. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · T. Myint
  • POSC 348: Strangers, Foreigners and Exiles*

    The course explores the role that strangers play in human life, the challenges that foreigners create for democratic politics, the promises they bring to it, as well as the role of exiles in improving the cultural capacity of societies to live with difference. We will read texts by Arendt, Kafka, Derrida, Sophocles, Said, Joseph Conrad, Tzvetan Todorov, and Julia Kristeva. Special attention will be given to the plight of Roma in Europe, as a typical case of strangers that are still perceived nowadays as a menace to the modern sedentary civilization. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · M. Czobor-Lupp
  • POSC 364: Capitalism and Its Critics*

    This research seminar examines the major debates in studies of contemporary capitalism in advanced capitalist and developing countries around the world. Moving beyond the classic theoretical debates of liberal, Marxist, developmentalist, and post-industrial arguments, the seminar will focus on recent debates concerning changes in labor markets, class structures, production systems, political institutions and social distribution, corporate governance, the multilateral system (e.g., IMF, the World Bank), supranational entities such as the European Union, and critical approaches on economic development, including new studies of the informal labor market. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2016 · A. Montero
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016 · Staff