Courses

Fall 2013

  • POSC 120: Comparative Political Regimes

    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013, Spring 2014 · D. Gupta, K. Freeeze, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2013, Spring 2014 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2013, Spring 2014 · L. Cooper, P. Petzschmann
  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014 · G. Marfleet, T. Myint
  • POSC 203: Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion

    Cross-listed with POSC 303.

    How does political advertising influence the electorate? Do "negative ads" turn voters off? Can advertising be used strategically to influence turnout, decreasing the participation of one of the major parties, while increasing the likelihood that others will vote? Election ads along with the six second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. The course includes a research experience.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · B. Allen
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

    Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 239: The Diplomat's Craft: Three Case Studies

    Diplomacy is the means by which states find common ground and resolve differences. Former ambassador Burt Levin uses three cases studies from his career to evaluate the relationships between diplomacy and policy implementation.

    3 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · B. Levin
  • POSC 251: Modern Political Philosophy: Modernity and Its Discontents

    Cross-listed with POSC 371.

    The philosophers who launched the modern age thought that humanity could achieve security and prosperity if people's concerns were directed away from transcendent longings (which often resulted in fanaticism and conflict) toward lower and more attainable ends. That project has borne impressive fruit. But it has also, almost from the beginning, stirred a restless discontent that has sometimes erupted in the form of utopian ideologies and totalitarian horrors. In this course we will study both those who helped launch the modern project (Hobbes, Spinoza, and/or Locke) and its most powerful critics (Rousseau, Nietzsche).

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 266: Urban Political Economy

    City revenue is increasingly dependent on tourism. Cities manufacture identity and entertainment, whether we think of Las Vegas or Jerusalem, Berlin or Bilbao, the ethnoscapes of Copenhagen or the red light district of Amsterdam. As cities compete in the global economy to become playgrounds for a transnational tourist class, what is the role of urban residents? Who governs? Who benefits? Short essays or exams will be required.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2013 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 268: Global Environmental Politics and Policy

    Global environmental politics and policy is the most prominent field that challenges traditional state-centric ways of thinking about international problems and solutions. This course examines local-global dynamics of environmental problems. The course will cover five arenas crucial to understanding the nature and origin of global environmental politics and policymaking mechanisms: (1) international environmental law; (2) world political orders; (3) human-environment interactions through politics and markets; (4) paradigms of sustainable development; and (5) dynamics of human values and rules.

    Prerequisites: none 6 credit; Social Sciences, Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · T. Myint
  • POSC 274: Political Psychology of Presidential Foreign Policy Decision Making

    This course examines the intersection of politics, personality and social psychology as applied to the analysis of U.S. foreign policy. It investigates the impact of individuals, group processes, political and social cognition, and political context on foreign policy decision-making. It explores questions such as: How do personalities of political leaders affect decision-making? How do processes of group decision making affect outcomes? How do individual differences in social and political perception shape elite decision-making? Case studies include Bay of Pigs, Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam War, Iranian Hostage Crisis, Iran-Contra Affair, Gulf War, and Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · J. Sullivan
  • POSC 285: The U.S. Intelligence Community

    Intelligence affects every aspect of the development of national security strategy and foreign policy objectives, and many other governmental decisions as well. Students will study the entire spectrum of the U.S. Intelligence Community, including the intelligence cycle; the many collection capabilities; the role of policymakers; intelligence oversight; budgeting; and the ethical and moral dilemmas of things like spying, covert action, counterintelligence, interrogation, and drone operations.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · J. Olson
  • POSC 303: Political Communication: Election Campaign Advertising and Public Opinion*

    Cross-listed with POSC.203.

    How does political advertising influence the electorate? Do "negative ads" turn voters off? Can advertising be used strategically to influence turnout, decreasing the participation of one of the major parties, while increasing the likelihood that others will vote? Election ads along with the six second "sound bite" are now among the major forms of political communication in modern democracies. We will study how ads are created and "work" from the standpoint of political psychology and film analysis. The course includes a research component and students enrolled at the 300 level will conduct more extensive analysis of data for their seminar papers.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · B. Allen
  • POSC 313: Legal Issues in Higher Education

    This seminar will explore pressing legal and public policy issues facing American colleges and universities. Since the Supreme Court will rule shortly on a major affirmative action case, we shall first examine how college admissions are shaped by legal principles. The course will also address ways in which core academic values (e.g., academic freedom; robust exchanges of ideas; the creation and maintenance of a community based on shared values) fit or conflict with legal rules and political dynamics that operate outside the academy. Likely topics include campus speech; faculty tenure; intellectual property; student records; and student discipline.

    2 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2013 · S. Poskanzer
  • POSC 322: Neoliberalism and the New Left in Latin America*

    This seminar will examine the "post-neoliberal" politics of Latin America, beginning with a reconsideration of the market-oriented turn in the region during the 1980s and 1990s. The seminar will then focus on the rise of leftist governments as diverse as Hugo Chávez' Venezuela, Evo Morales' Bolivia, and Lula da Silva's Brazil. Other topics will include the emergence of anti-neoliberal movements, the wave of indigenous politics, new social movements, environmental politics, and experiments with anti-poverty programs throughout Latin America.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · A. Montero
  • POSC 355: Identity, Culture and Rights*

    This course will look at the contemporary debate in multiculturalism in the context of a variety of liberal philosophical traditions, including contractarians, libertarians, and Utilitarians. These views of the relationship of individual to community will be compared to those of the communitarian and egalitarian traditions. Research papers may use a number of feminist theory frameworks and methods.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · B. Allen
  • POSC 358: Comparative Social Movements*

    This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 364: Capitalism and Its Critics*

    This research seminar examines the major debates in studies of contemporary capitalism in advanced capitalist and developing countries around the world. Moving beyond the classic theoretical debates of liberal, Marxist, developmentalist, and post-industrial arguments, the seminar will focus on recent debates concerning changes in labor markets, class structures, production systems, political institutions and social distribution, corporate governance, the multilateral system (e.g., IMF, the World Bank), supranational entities such as the European Union, and critical approaches on economic development, including new studies of the informal labor market.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · A. Montero
  • POSC 371: Modern Political Philosophy: Modernity and Its Discontents

    Cross-listed with POSC.251.

    The philosophers who launched the modern age thought that humanity could achieve security and prosperity if people's concerns were directed away from transcendent longings (which often resulted in fanaticism and conflict) toward lower and more attainable ends. That project has borne impressive fruit. But it has also, almost from the beginning, stirred a restless discontent that has sometimes erupted in the form of utopian ideologies and totalitarian horrors. In this course we will study both those who helped launch the modern project (Hobbes, Spinoza, and/or Locke) and its most powerful critics (Rousseau, Nietzsche).

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff

Winter 2014

  • POSC 170: International Relations and World Politics

    A survey of factors in international relations of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character; systems of international relations, including bipolar deterrence, polycentrism, and international organization; and dynamics of international relations, including war, diplomacy, and international economic and social development.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014 · G. Marfleet, T. Myint
  • POSC 209: Place, Politics, and Citizen Mobilization

    Citizen mobilization often centers around environmental problems or other controversies about the shape of community landscapes. We will explore concepts of democracy, power, identity, and sense of place as we examine cases of citizen mobilization. The class will research a current case study of an environmental controversy that gave rise to citizen mobilization. When and why do people in a community mobilize? What are the obstacles to community-based political action? How do local communities mobilize to meet the challenge of broader issues, such as climate change? Are the Occupy protests similar to community-based mobilization?

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2014 · P. Cavanaugh
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

    Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 238: Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football

    This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · Non-Carleton Faculty
  • POSC 241: Ethnic Conflict

    Ethnic conflict is a persistent and troubling challenge for those interested in preserving international peace and stability. By one account, ethnic violence has claimed more than ten million lives since 1945, and in the 1990s, ethnic conflicts comprised nearly half of all ongoing conflicts around the world. In this course, we will attempt to understand the conditions that contribute to ethnic tensions, identify the triggers that lead to escalation, and evaluate alternative ideas for managing and solving such disputes. The course will draw on a number of cases, including Rwanda, Bosnia, and Northern Ireland.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 263: European Political Economy

    An introduction to the politics of the European region during the post-World War II period. Students will examine the political conditions that gave impetus to the creation, maintenance, crisis, and decline of Keynesian economic policies, social welfare states, social democratic partisan alliances, and cooperative patterns of industrial relations. The course will examine the rise and reform of the project of European integration. The course will also address the particular problems faced by the East European countries as they attempt to make a transition from authoritarian, command economies to democratic, market-based economies.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · A. Montero
  • POSC 264: Politics of Contemporary China

    This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 269: Issues in Postmodern Political Thought

    This course will introduce several critiques of modern political thought and practice that considered "the project of modernity" to be either fatally flawed or at least deficient. Important themes in their work are the critique of the enlightenment and mass society, of power, agency as well as liberal concepts of the state and the political. In class discussion we will also address questions of method and language through the work of Nietzsche, Schmitt, Foucault, Habermas, Ricoeur, Bourdieu, Gadamer, among others.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · P. Petzschmann
  • POSC 272: Constitutional Law II

    Covers American constitutional law and history from Reconstruction to the contemporary era. Extensive attention will be paid to the effort to refound the American constitution following the Civil War as manifest in the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments, and to the successive transformations which the Supreme Court worked in the new constitutional order. Political Science 271 is not a prerequisite.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2014 · K. Smith
  • POSC 328: Foreign Policy Analysis*

    Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2014 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 352: Political Theory of Alexis de Tocqueville*

    This course will be devoted to close study of Tocqueville's Democracy in America, which has plausibly been described as the best book ever written about democracy and the best book every written about America. Tocqueville uncovers the myriad ways in which equality, including especially the passion for equality, determines the character and the possibilities of modern humanity. Tocqueville thereby provides a political education that is also an education toward self-knowledge.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Writing Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2014 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 361: Approaches to Development*

    The meaning of "development" has been contested across multiple disciplines. The development and continual existence of past civilizations has been at the core of the discourse among those who study factors leading to the rise and fall of civilizations. Can we reconcile the meaning of development in economic terms with cultural, ecological, political, religious, social and spiritual terms? How can we measure it quantitatively? What and how do the UNDP Human Development Indexes and the World Development Reports measure? What are the exemplary cases that illustrate development? How do individual choices and patterns of livelihood activities link to development trends?

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · T. Myint
  • POSC 365: Political Economy of Global Tourism*

    As manufacturing has migrated to places with cheaper labor, many cities have turned to tourism to attract capital, employ low-skilled labor, and develop a niche in the global economy. We will pay particular attention to the consequences, for cities and their inhabitants, of the policy of tourism-driven economic development. We will also consider what it is that is being manufactured, marketed and sold in the tourist economy. Our investigation will proceed in an interdisciplinary manner, with inquiry into the political, sociological, anthropological, and economic consequences of tourism.

    Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites but participation in a college-level study abroad program will be an asset. 6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · R. Keiser
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff

Spring 2014

  • POSC 120: Comparative Political Regimes

    An introduction to the fundamentals of government and the variety of ways politics is practiced in different countries. Capitalist democracies, transitional states and developing nations are compared.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013, Spring 2014 · D. Gupta, K. Freeeze, A. Montero
  • POSC 122: Politics in America: Liberty and Equality

    An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2013, Spring 2014 · R. Keiser, S. Schier
  • POSC 160: Political Philosophy

    Introduction to ancient and modern political philosophy. We will investigate several fundamentally different approaches to the basic questions of politics--questions concerning the character of political life, the possibilities and limits of politics, justice, and the good society--and the philosophic presuppositions (concerning human nature and human flourishing) that underlie these, and all, political questions.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Humanistic Inquiry; offered Fall 2013, Spring 2014 · L. Cooper, P. Petzschmann
  • POSC 201: National Policymaking

    We will explore factors that influence public policy in the U.S., beginning with the politics of the policy formation process, including nongovernmental actors (corporations, media, nonprofit organizations, citizens, interest groups), and major governmental institutions. We will discuss fundamental American political concepts such as liberty, power, and democracy, and the role of citizens. Our goals are to increase understanding of the wide array of political factors that determine the feasibility and/or desirability of a particular course of action in response to a perceived problem, and to evaluate the status of various kinds of knowledge claims, including sources of credibility.

    Prerequisites: Political Science 122 or sophomore standing 6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2014 · P. Cavanaugh
  • POSC 222: The Politics of Food: Producers, Consumers and Citizenship

    Although what we eat everyday is familiar and biologically intimate, it is also a part of a complex political system. In this course we will learn about and reflect upon the political aspects of food in the U.S. Topics include food history, agribusiness, local food movements, food policy, and social justice. What influences the way we eat? How did ignorance about food become the norm in the U.S.? The course will include guest speakers and possibly field trips.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2014 · P. Cavanaugh
  • POSC 223: Food Justice

    Systems for growing, processing and distributing food have been subject to claims that they are unjust, yet problems persist. This course will examine concepts of justice and apply them to issues related to farmworkers, factory works and others who produce our food, poverty and access to food, and genetically modified organisms as they relate to control of production. We will ask how justice relates to sustainability. Although the course will focus on the United States, global issues such as immigration and food sovereignty will be included. Students will have the opportunity to explore food justice issues in other countries.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · P. Cavanaugh
  • POSC 230: Methods of Political Research

    An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

    Prerequisites: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 265, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5). 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · G. Marfleet, K. Freeze
  • POSC 236: Global, National and Human Security

    What are the greatest threats to national and global security? In this course we will explore a range of traditional security topics including: the proliferation of WMDs, terrorism, piracy, insurgencies, arms races, territorial disputes and strategic rivalries. In addition to these classic concerns, we also consider newer ones such as cyber-security, the threat of global pandemics, unmanned warfare and the impact of climate change. Our study begins and concludes with the debate over the concept of security in the twenty-first century.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · G. Marfleet
  • POSC 237: Southeast Asian Politics

    This course will cover key thematic issues of Southeast Asian politics, including the challenges of democracy, regional integration, environmental politics, the rise of the power of non-state actors, and struggles for citizen-sovereignty of the people. We will examine these frontier issues against the background of Southeast Asia's societal evolution through kingdoms, colonial eras, emergence of nation-states, and the influence of globalization on politics.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · T. Myint
  • POSC 240: On America and Its Wars

    From a nation which prided itself on remaining aloof from the intrigues and struggles of foreign powers, the United States over the past century has become regularly involved in a series of major and limited wars. The course will examine a number of these conflicts and the debates that surrounded them in the hope of discerning the influence they may have on America's ongoing role and behavior in the international arena.

    3 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · B. Levin
  • POSC 247: Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Comparative Nationalism

    This class uses the experiences of different European countries as a lens to examine the role of nationalism in contemporary politics, particularly how societies construct national identities and who does (and does not) belong to that national community. In the classroom portion of this seminar, students will be introduced to the theory and practice of nationalism as well as some of its contemporary manifestations. We will also examine the activities of European separatist movements, including the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence from the UK.

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 248: The U.S.-Chinease Relationship

    This course will examine the interaction between China and America from the inception in the late eighteenth century to the present, with greater emphasis on more recent events. The focus will be on evaluating the underlying and persisting factors which have made Sino-U.S. relations so special and difficult.

    3 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · B. Levin
  • POSC 253: Marxist Political Thought

    This discussion seminar introduces key texts of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels as well as the writings of Marxists since Marx's death, such as Lenin, Gramsci, Bernstein and others. The course will address concepts in their writings such as alienation, historical materialism, class, the state, science and ideology, socialism and social democracy. While a lot of attention is paid to Marxist theory, we will also consider the political contexts in which theories and debates emerged and their implications for political practice.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · P. Petzschmann
  • POSC 254: Freedom, Excellence, Happiness: Aristotle's Ethics

    What does it mean to be morally excellent? To be politically excellent? To be intellectually and spiritually excellent? Are these things mutually compatible? Do they lie within the reach of everyone? And what is the relation between excellence and pleasure? Between excellence and happiness? Aristotle addresses these questions in intricate and illuminating detail in the Nicomachean Ethics, which we will study in this course. The Ethics is more accessible than some of Aristotle's other works. But it is also a multifaceted and multi-layered book, and one that reveals more to those who study it with care.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2014 · L. Cooper
  • POSC 338: Politics of Inequality and Poverty*

    The unequal distribution of income and assets is arguably the most important issue in many political systems around the world, and debates over the appropriate role of government in fighting inequality form a primary dimension of political competition. In this course, we will explore the politics surrounding economic inequality around the world. We will discuss how inequality influences political participation in democracies and dictatorships, shapes prospects for democratic transition/consolidation, and affects economic growth and social well-being. We will also examine when and how political institutions can mitigate negative aspects of inequality.

    Prerequisites: Political Science 230. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · K. Freeze
  • POSC 383: Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Politics of the European

    This course examines the formation, development, institutions, laws, and major policies of the European Union. It will introduce students to some of the key challenges of EU-level governance and pressing policy problems facing the European community. In addition to classroom activities, students will travel to Brussels and other sites to meet with policy makers and observe the dynamics of EU institutions, including the Committee of the Regions, the European Parliament in Strasbourg, and Frontex (the EU's border control agency) in Warsaw.

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · Non-Carleton Faculty
  • POSC 392: Identity and Belonging in the New Europe: Comparative Field Research Methods

    Throughout the program, students will work in groups to carry out sustained research on the impact that the European Union has had on a selected policy area, such as immigration, minority protections, national self-determination, or human rights. These groups will design and carry out a project involving a combination of field research techniques in comparative politics, including elite interviews, archival research, and quantitative data analysis. Students will spend the first three weeks of the program conducting preparatory background research, developing a list of contacts and research questions, practicing interviewing and other data collection skills, and learning how to process and analyze the field data that they collect.

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2014 · D. Gupta
  • POSC 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff