Courses

Fall 2014

  • SOAN 100: Debating Difference in Twenty-first Century America

    For decades, sociologists have studied race, gender, and class as clearly-bounded social categories. This paradigm emphasized multiculturalism and focused on the experiences of subordinated groups--racial minorities, women, and the working and lower class. More recently, social, political, and economic changes such as increasing immigration, globalization, the "war on terror," and marriage equality, have questioned who belongs to these categories, and where within them, as well as the implications and meaning of inclusion and diversity. In this A and I seminar, we will examine recent scholarship which considers these questions through the concept of "difference' in the twenty-first century United States. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Argument and Inquiry Seminar, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2014 · D. Williams
  • SOAN 110: Introduction to Anthropology

    An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · C. Ocampo-Raeder, J. Levi
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 110

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures; stability and change in societies of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Pros and cons of various theoretical strategies will be emphasized. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · E. Raleigh, Staff
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 111

     Syllabus, Winter 2014

  • SOAN 203: Anthropology of Good Intentions

    Is the environmental movement making progress? Do responsible products actually help local populations? Is international AID alleviating poverty and fostering development? Today there are thousands of programs with sustainable development goals yet their effectiveness is often contested at the local level. This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them. In doing so we hope to uncover common pitfalls behind good intentions and the need for sound social analysis that recognizes, examines, and evaluates the role of cultural complexity found in populations targeted by these programs. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · C. Ocampo-Raeder
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 203

    Syllabus, Fall 2013

  • SOAN 204: Media and Society

    Do you feel lost without your iPhone? Did you feel empty when Breaking Bad ended? Have Twitter and Instagram improved your life? In this course we critically examine the socio-cultural origins and impact of media technologies. Using perspectives from sociology, critical theory and cultural studies, we investigate the ways in which media of communication help shape ourselves and our social world. From mass media to social media, we focus on issues of power and inequality to understand and evaluate our media-saturated world. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2014 · B. Fuller
  • SOAN 218: Asians in the United States

    Are Asian Americans forever foreigners or honorary white? This class introduces you to the sociological research on Asian Americans. We begin by a brief introduction of U.S. immigration history and sociological theories about assimilation and racial stratification. We then cover research on racial and ethnic identity, educational stratification, mass media images, interracial marriage, multiracials, transracial adoption, and the viability of an Asian American panethnic identity. We will also examine the similarities and differences of Asian Americans relative to other minority groups when applicable. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2014 · L. Raleigh
  • SOAN 227: Masculinities and Gender

    In the study of gender, masculinity has been largely hidden as a social construct; yet masculinity informs and shapes nearly all aspects of social life. In this course, we examine how masculinity operates in institutions such as schools, the workplace, sports, and the family; in social interactions and identities in everyday life; and in popular culture, media, and national and social formations. As a socio-historical construct, there is not one, but multiple masculinities. We will therefore adopt a comparative, intersectional lens, examining how masculinity is simultaneously constructed through categories of difference such as race, nationality, class, and sexuality. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2014 · D. Williams
  • SOAN 302: Anthropology and Indigenous Rights

    This seminar examines the relationship between culture and human rights from an anthropological perspective. By asking "who are indigenous peoples?" and "what specific rights do they have?" this course introduces students to a comparative framework for understanding cultural rights discourse. Given the history of intolerance to difference, the seminar demonstrates the need to explore the determinants of violence, ethnocide, and exploitation routinely committed against the world's most marginalized peoples. At the same time, it also asks about the limits of tolerance, if human rights abuses are perpetrated under the banner of cultural pluralism. Students will analyze case studies drawn from Africa, Asia, and the Americas, as well as issues that cross-cut these regions. Prerequisite: Sociology and Anthropology 110, 111 or permision of the instructor; upper division coursework in anthropology, sociology, history or philosophy recommended. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014 · J. Levi
  • SOAN 330: Sociological Thought and Theory

    Classical sociological theory has been concerned with at least three fundamental questions. They are the nature of the historic transition from feudalism to capitalism, the appropriate method of social studies, and the form of a rational society. Beginning with the Enlightenment and romanticism, we study nineteenth century positivism, liberalism, Marxism and nihilism, and investigate the ideas of Weber and Durkheim at the turn of the century. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2014 · Staff
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 330

    Syllabus, Fall 2013

  • SOAN 396: Advanced Sociological and Anthropological Writing

    This course explores different genres of writing and different audiences for writing in the social sciences, focusing particular attention on scholarly articles published in professional journals in sociology and anthropology. To that end, students both analyze sociological and anthropological articles regarding commonalities and differences in academic writing in our two sister disciplines. Students work on their own academic writing process (with the help of peer-review and instructor feedback). The writing itself is broken down into component elements on which students practice and revise their work. Prerequisites: Completion of Sociology/Anthropology 240 or submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and submission of a comps thesis proposal on the first day of fall term. Senior Sociology/Anthropology major or consent of the instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement; offered Fall 2014 · P. Feldman-Salvelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 396

    Syllabus, Fall 2013

  • SOAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    Senior sociology/anthropology majors fulfill the integrative exercise by writing a senior thesis on a topic approved by the department. Students must enroll in six credits to write the thesis, spread as the student likes over Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. The process begins with the submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and concludes with a public presentation in spring of the senior year. Please consult the Sociology and Anthropology website for a full description. 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · Staff

Winter 2015

  • SOAN 110: Introduction to Anthropology

    An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · C. Ocampo-Raeder, J. Levi
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 110

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures; stability and change in societies of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Pros and cons of various theoretical strategies will be emphasized. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · E. Raleigh, Staff
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 111

     Syllabus, Winter 2014

  • SOAN 114: Modern Families: An Introduction to the Sociology of the Family

    What makes a family? How has the conception of kinship and the 'normal' family changed over the generations? In this introductory class, we examine these questions, drawing on a variety of course materials ranging from classic works in sociology to contemporary blogs on family life. The class focuses on diversity in family life, paying particular attention to the intersection between the family, race and ethnicity, and social class. We'll examine these issues at the micro and macro level, incorporating texts that focus on individuals' stories as well as demographics of the family. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Winter 2015 · L. Raleigh
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 114

    Syllabus, Winter 2014

  • SOAN 217: Capitalism, Consumption, and Culture

    Our contemporary world is importantly structured by the market system. In this course we'll explore the significance of the economy for our everyday lives. Grounding our analysis in political economy and critical sociology, we'll explore the nature and origins of our economic system, and the economic dynamics which help to structure our selves, lives, and communities. Significant themes will include inequality, identity, morality, and freedom. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · B. Fuller
  • SOAN 225: Social Movements

    In this course we will consider questions of how ordinary women and men have come together to reshape the societies in which they live and the difficult choices they have faced in the process. We will explore factors affecting the emergence, growth, structure and impact of social movements as their participants intentionally attempt to bring about social change, transform social relationships and reshape social values. Major theoretical perspectives (concerning collective behavior, resource mobilization, and new social movements) will be examined in light of some of the most important social movements from around the world. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · D. Williams
  • SOAN 262: Anthropology of Health and Illness

    An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · P. Feldman-Salvelsberg
  • SOAN 272: Race and Ethnicity in the United States

    Some people think that we are in a post-racial society. However, social scientists know that race continues to shape our lives. This course provides an overview of the study of race and ethnicity through a sociological framework. Primarily, we focus on the changing construction of racial categories and analyze race through the lens of inequality. We investigate how race intersects with gender and class to shape identity and opportunity. In addition, we examine the fluidity of racial categories, concluding with a discussion of interracial unions and the multiracial population in the United States. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2015 · L. Raleigh
  • SOAN 283: Immigration and Immigrants in Europe and the United States

    Immigration has always been a defining feature of American society, yet in European countries it has also been raising a number of questions about national identity, citizenship, belonging and rights. Who are contemporary immigrants in the United States and Europe? How are they received in host societies? How do they participate in and become incorporated into the host society? What ties do they maintain to their countries of origin? How do policies respond to and shape immigrants and immigration? In this course, we will consider these questions and more from the perspectives of immigrants as well as host societies. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · D. Williams
  • SOAN 285: The Ethics of Civic Engagement

    In this course, students will discuss the ethical questions that arise when they engage with others in research, service, organizing, or policy work. Students will read and talk about the meanings and forms of civic engagement and use these readings to reflect upon their own research or service projects, or to reflect upon the college's role in Haiti or Faribault, two areas where college members are actively engaged. Gaining insights from sociological and practice based readings, we will examine different perspectives on the ways that power and privilege relate to civic engagement. 3 credit; S/CR/NC; Social Inquiry; offered Winter 2015 · A. Falc√≥n
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 285

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 323: Mother Earth: Women, Development and the Environment

    Why are so many sustainable development projects anchored around women's cooperatives? Why is poverty depicted as having a woman's face? Is the solution to the environmental crisis in the hands of women the nurturers? From overly romantic notions of stewardship to the feminization of poverty, this course aims to evaluate women's relationships with local environments and development initiatives. The course uses anthropological frameworks to evaluate case studies from around the world. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · C. Ocampo-Raeder
  • SOAN 331: Anthropological Thought and Theory

    A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements. Prerequisites: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 or permission of the instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Winter 2015 · J. Levi
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 331

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    Senior sociology/anthropology majors fulfill the integrative exercise by writing a senior thesis on a topic approved by the department. Students must enroll in six credits to write the thesis, spread as the student likes over Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. The process begins with the submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and concludes with a public presentation in spring of the senior year. Please consult the Sociology and Anthropology website for a full description. 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · Staff

Spring 2015

  • SOAN 110: Introduction to Anthropology

    An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · C. Ocampo-Raeder, J. Levi
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 110

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 111: Introduction to Sociology

    An introduction to sociology, including analysis of the sociological perspective, culture, socialization, demography, and social class and caste institutions in modern industrial societies and cultures; stability and change in societies of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Pros and cons of various theoretical strategies will be emphasized. 6 credit; Social Inquiry; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · E. Raleigh, Staff
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 111

     Syllabus, Winter 2014

  • SOAN 202: Girls Gone Bad: Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice

    Criminologists agree that sex is a major correlate of criminal activity. Whether we examine official statistics, self-report data, or victimization surveys, the pattern is strong and persistent: males commit more crime than females and the types of offenses males commit tend to be more serious. While crime is predominantly a male phenomenon, in this course we examine female criminality. In doing so, we learn about the social basis of criminal activity, the assumptions present in criminological theory, and the ways in which criminal justice practices are gendered. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2015 · A. Nierobisz
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 202

    Syllabus, Spring 2014

  • SOAN 223: Sport and Society

    Our love of sport is matched only by the belief that it is not worthy of deeper thought, inquiry, or critique. In this course we will work through theoretical approaches that help us understand the social phenomenon and its seemingly paradoxical position as both one of our most powerful and least respected institutions. We will then examine the way sport intersects with and shapes our understanding of important social issues such as gender, race, politics, nationality, and the human body. Our discussions will cover a wide-range of sports and physical practices ranging from the mainstream to the subcultural to the extreme. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2015 · K. Green
  • SOAN 233: Anthropology of Food

    Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · C. Ocampo-Raeder
  • SOAN 239: Social Statistics

    What does it for something to be statistically significant? This course will ask and answer this question by teaching social science students how to interpret data. This elementary statistics course covers descriptive and inferential statistics up to regression. Whenever possible, we will 'flip' the classroom -- using class time for activities and problem sets, and using out of class time for online lectures to introduce new material. We will focus on calculating and applying social statistics, rather than statistical theory. No prior knowledge of statistics is required. 6 credit; Formal or Statistical Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2015 · L. Raleigh
  • SOAN 240: Methods of Social Research

    The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable. Prerequisites: Sociology and Anthropology 110 or 111; Sociology and Anthropology 239 or Mathematics 115 or Mathematics 215. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, Quantitative Reasoning Encounter; offered Spring 2015 · A. Nierobisz
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 240

    Syllabus, Winter 2014

  • SOAN 256: Ethnography of Africa

    Pairing classics in Africanist anthropology with contemporary re-studies, we explore changes in African societies and in the questions anthropologists have posed about them. We address issues of representation and self-presentation in written ethnographies as well as in African portrait photography. We then turn from the visual to the invisible realm of African witchcraft. Initiation rituals, war, and migration place selfhood and belonging back in this-world contexts. In-depth case studies include, among others: the Cameroon Grassfields, the Bemba of Zambia, and the Nuer of South Sudan. Prerequisites: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above. 6 credit; Writing Requirement, Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · P. Feldman-Salvelsberg
  • SOAN 395: Ethnography of Reproduction

    This seminar explores the meanings of reproductive beliefs and practices in comparative perspective. Using ethnographies, it explores the relation between human and social reproduction. It focuses on (but is not limited to) ethnographic examples from the United States/Canada and from sub-Saharan Africa (societies with relatively low fertility and high utilization of technology and societies with mostly high fertility and low utilization of technology). Topics examined include fertility and birth, fertility rites, new reproductive technologies, abortion, population control, infertility, child survival and child loss. Prerequisites: Sociology and Anthropology 110 or 111; and 226, 260, or 262; or permission of the instructor. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Writing Requirement, International Studies; offered Spring 2015 · P. Feldman-Salvelsberg
    Extended departmental description for SOAN 395

     Syllabus, Spring 2013

  • SOAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    Senior sociology/anthropology majors fulfill the integrative exercise by writing a senior thesis on a topic approved by the department. Students must enroll in six credits to write the thesis, spread as the student likes over Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. The process begins with the submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and concludes with a public presentation in spring of the senior year. Please consult the Sociology and Anthropology website for a full description. 6 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Spring 2015 · Staff