Courses (Catalog)

  • SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish

    This course introduces the basic structures of the Spanish language, everyday vocabulary and cultural situations. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish. Prerequisite: none (Placement score for students with previous experience in Spanish).

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2013 · Staff
  • SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish

    This course introduces complex sentences and various tenses and short literary and cultural texts. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 101 or placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Winter 2014 · Staff
  • SPAN 103: Intermediate Spanish

    This course continues the study of complex sentence patterns and reviews basic patterns in greater depth, partly through the discussion of authentic short stories. Students practice all four skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) in Spanish. Taught five days a week in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 102 or placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Spring 2014 · Staff
  • SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish

    Through discussion of literary and cultural texts and films, as well as a review of grammar, this course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. Taught three days a week in Spanish. Some Spanish 204 sections include a service-learning component, to enrich students' understanding of course material by integrating academic study with public service. The language classes team up with the Northfield public schools to help both Northfield and Carleton students improve their language skills. Prerequisites: Spanish 103 or placement score. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014 · Staff
  • SPAN 205: Conversation and Composition

    A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · J. Brioso, J. Cerna-Bazán, H. Huergo
  • SPAN 206: Introduction to Public Speech in Spanish

    In this course the students will learn the process of shaping ideas into an effective oral presentation in Spanish. We will pay particular attention to the process of selecting supporting data and other materials as well as the mechanics of arranging ideas in a logical manner, and delivering the speech effectively. The course will offer several opportunities for impromptu speaking experiences. Through the course, the students will prepare and deliver specialized forms of public speeches. Emphasis will be placed on a variety of types of persuasive and ceremonial speeches. There will be some mandatory films and talks outside of class.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or its equivalentHumanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · P. Álvarez Blanco
  • SPAN 207: Exploring Hispanic Culture

    Designed for the person who wants to develop greater fluency in speaking, writing, and reading Spanish in the context of a broad introduction to Hispanic culture. Short stories, plays, poems, films, and short novels are read with the goal of enhancing awareness of Hispanic diversity and stimulating classroom discussion. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 6 credit; Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 208: Coffee and News

    An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency. 2 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · S. López
  • SPAN 209: Madrid Program: Contemporary Spanish History

    An overview of Spanish history, culture, and politics with an emphasis on current issues such as immigration, education laws, the european Union, unemployment, and nationalism.

    4 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · H. Huergo
  • SPAN 210: Improving Spanish through Translation

    The focus of this course is to review some key grammatical structures through communicative translation exercises, as well as to become more aware of pragmatic and discursive differences between Spanish and English. Translation exercises are prepared at home and class time is devoted to discussion and constructive criticism about grammar and style. The course will be taught primarily in Spanish. This course will enhance students' skills in Spanish writing, reading, speaking and listening. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or its equivalent 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2014 · B. Pariente-Beltran
  • SPAN 211: Peru Program: Writing and Conversation

    This course aims at further development of communicative skills in Spanish. The strong emphasis on student presentations and interactions with native speakers are oriented toward a greater fluency in spoken Spanish. The course focuses on the grammar of compound sentence and structures beyond the sentence level, and includes practice of different registers and varieties of writing in Spanish. Written work and class discussion focus on relevant aspects of Peruvian and Latin American social reality.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · J. Cerna-Bazán
  • SPAN 220: Magical Realism in Latin American Narrative

    Is it real? A concern with the interplay between reality and fiction rests at the heart of Magical Realism--a mode of discourse and a perspective on the problem of representation that informs a good many of the best known works in Latin American literature. This course will examine works in translation by authors such as Alejo Carpentier, Gabriel García Márquez, Julio Cortázar, Isabel Allende, Laura Esquivel. We'll close the course with a nod to those authors who reject Magical Realism as the primary mode of fiction in Latin American prose.

    6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 222: Two Voices: Gabriel García Márquez and Laura Restrepo

    Considered one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, Gabriel García Márquez defines magical realism. His works record the reality of his native Colombia, embedding it within the mythic patterns of Latin American cultures and histories. Like García Márquez, Laura Restrepo began her writing career as a journalist, but her lens remains firmly anchored in the reality of Colombia's encounters with political violence and drug cartels. In what she calls "report style," Restrepo, too, tells the story of Colombia. The course focuses on selected works by these two authors, a study of contexts, themes, and styles.

    Prerequisites: In translation. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · B. Boling
  • SPAN 240: Introduction to Spanish Literature

    This course will examine the uniqueness of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. What is unique about Spanish literature? The meeting of Arabs, Christians, and Jews; the discovery of the Indies as told by Christopher Columbus; the enormous cultural and ethnic complexity of the conquest of the New World; the creation of the modern novel in the Lazarillo and its destruction in Cervante's Don Quixote; the mystic eroticism of St. Therese and St. John of the Cross; the ruminative poetry of Antonio Machado and the mythical poetry of Lorca. Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or its equivalent 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 242: Introduction to Latin American Literature

    An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · S. López
  • SPAN 244: Spain Today: Recent Changes through Narrative and Film

    Since the death of Franco in 1975, Spain has undergone huge political, socio-economic, and cultural transformations. Changes in the traditional roles of women, the legalization of gay marriage, the decline of the Catholic church, the increase of immigrants, Catalan and Basque nationalisms, and the integration of Spain in the European Union, have all challenged the definition of a national identity. Through contemporary narrative and film, this course will examine some of these changes and how they contribute to the creation of what we call Spain today.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · P. Álvarez Blanco
  • SPAN 247: Spanish Seminar in Madrid: Spanish and Italian Art in the Age of Velazquez

    This course is a study of the artistic exchange between Spain and Italy during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Artists studied include Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Bernini, and the stay of Velazquez in Rome. The first part of the course takes place in Rome and the rest in Madrid.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or proficiency. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · Non-Carleton Faculty
  • SPAN 255: Women Dramatists in Latin America: Staging Conflicts

    This course examines contemporary plays written by Latin American women from a gendered perspective. Issues range from women and political repression to a critique of gender roles. As we read the plays, we will consider both the literary qualities of dramatic texts and the semiotics of staging and its potential for reconceptualizing women's roles in Latin American society and culture. Possible dramatists are Luisa Josefina Hernández, Rosario Castellanos, Griselda Gambaro, Elena Garro, Sabina Berman, Susana Torres Molina, Marcela del Río.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 256: Lorca, Buñuel and Dal­í: Poetry, Film, and Painting in Spain

    Lorca, Buñuel, and Dalí attended the same college in Madrid. It was the 1920s and the young were truly young and almost everything was possible. Soon Lorca became Dalí's secret lover and muse, inspiring many of his early paintings and launching his career in the artistic circles of Barcelona and Madrid. At the same time, Dalí collaborated with Buñuel in two landmarks of experimental cinema--The Andalusian Dog and The Golden Age. This course examines the friendship between the three artists and their place in the history of twentieth-century art, film, and literature. Extra time. Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or proficiency 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 260: Forces of Nature

    This course examines nature and its relationship to Latin American identity across the last 200 years, but with emphasis on the twentieth century. Paradise regained and lost, monster or endangered habitat, nature plays a central role in Latin American development and its literature. Its literary image has varied greatly in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, at times suggesting the lost Garden of Eden, at other times mirroring human cruelty, and recently coming center stage in the ecological novel. Among the authors studied in this course are Sarmiento, Quiroga, Gallegos, Rulfo, Seplveda, Belli, and Montero.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or proficiency 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · B. Boling
  • SPAN 262: Myth and History in Central American Literature

    In this course we study the relationship between myth and history in Central America since its origins in the Popol Vuh, the sacred texts of the Mayans until the period of the post-civil wars era. The course is organized in a chronological manner. We will study, in addition to the Popol Vuh, the chronicles of Alvarado, some poems by Rubén Darío and Francisco Gavidia, some of the writings of Miguel Ángel Asturias and Salarrué. The course will end with a study of critical visions of the mythical presented by more contemporary authors such as Roque Dalton and Luis de Lión.

    6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 263: History of Human Rights

    This course proposes a genealogical study of the concept of Human Rights. The course will begin with the debates in sixteenth century Spain about the theological, political and juridical rights of "Indians." The course will cover four centuries and the following topics will be discussed: the debates about poverty in sixteenth century Spain; the birth of the concept of tolerance in the eighteenth century; the creation of the modern political constitution in the United States, France and Spain; the debates about women's rights, abortion and euthanasia, etc.

    6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 266: Postwar Central American LIterature

    We study the resurgence of literature in Central America during the 1990s after the various political conflicts in the region (a civil war, a revolution and an insurgence). We will examine how the reconstruction of the public sphere in these countries included a rethinking of civil society via literature. We will study how literature from this period reimagines national frontiers as members of the diasporic communities that resulted from the political conflicts produced texts and posed difficult questions about what is a national literature. Among the authors studied will be Horacio Castellanos Moya, Jacinta Escudos Rodrigo Rey Rosa and Franz Galich.

    6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · Y. Perez
  • SPAN 269: Peru Program: Diversity, Conflict and Culture in Peru

    This class focuses on key cultural manifestations arising from class, social, ethnic and regional conflicts of contemporary Peru. Intellectual and artistic production as well as materials drawn from popular culture sources are examined for class discussion and projects. Classes are supplemented by visits to relevant sites and by lectures by local intellectuals.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · J. Cerna-Bazán
  • SPAN 277: The Poem as Artifact: Art and Work in Contemporary Spanish American Poetry

    Poetry will be studied as an activity that shares a common ground with other social practices. In particular, we will examine particular moments and cases of Latin American literature in which the poem (the making of poetry and the form of the text) has been conceived in its connection with work, that is, with the process of transformation of materiality into specific "objects," involving a necessary social use of time and space. We will explore this topic starting with Modernismo and, after covering the Vanguardias, will get to some key developments from the 1960s to present.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 204 or equivalent 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis; offered Fall 2013 · J. Cerna-Bazán
  • SPAN 290: Spanish Seminar in Madrid Program: Independent Reading

    Basic readings in Spanish history and culture in preparation for the program.

    2 credit; S/CR/NC; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement, Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement; offered Fall 2013 · H. Huergo
  • SPAN 301: Greek and Christian Tragedy

    This course is a comparative study of classical and Christian tragedy from Sophocles to Valle Inclán and from Aristotle to Nietzsche. Classes alternate between lectures and group discussions. Course requisites include a midterm exam and a final paper. All readings are in Spanish, Sophocles and Aristotle included.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 320: New Spanish Voices

    Since 1980, Spain has experienced a literary and artistic boom, with scores of young novelists and filmmakers whose works challenge traditional notions of the individual and society. This course will examine some of these works, paying attention to regions of Spain normally excluded from the curriculum--Galicia, the Basque Country, and Catalonia. Discussions topics include gender and sexuality, cultural and personal memory, exile and migration, and the relationship between voice and power. Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 321: Murder as a Fine Art: The Detective Novel in Latin America

    We will study the socio-historical factors that gave rise to the genre as well as some of its classical predecessors (Poe, Chandler). We will then turn our attention to some prominent heirs of this genre in Latin America (Borges, Piglia, Bolaño) and end by studying why in contemporary Central American literature the genre is enjoying a resurgence (Menjívar, Castellanos Moya and Rey Rosa). We will study the specific traits the genre has adopted in Latin America and how it has become a mirror that often reflects the political and social realities confronting the region, particularly in Central America.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · Y. Pérez
  • SPAN 328: Contemporary Fiction and the Market

    In this course we will be studying the various meanings of what has been labeled, esthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity. We will also study the relationship between "postmodernism" and what has been called the "culture of contentment" or "culture of well-being," and we will attempt to understand the interactions that exist between culture, market and dominant ideology. To develop this theme we will focus on Spain, but will also continually establish relationships with other countries. This course includes many cultural products (novels, films, documentaries, animated essays, visual poetry, gag cartoons, graphic novel, comics, etc.). Evening films, guest lectures.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or Spanish 207. 6 credit; Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · P. Álvarez Blanco
  • SPAN 330: The Invention of the Modern Novel: Cervantes' Don Quijote

    Among other things, Don Quijote is a "remake," an adaptation of several literary models popular at the time the picaresque novel, the chivalry novel, the sentimental novel, the Byzantine novel, the Italian novella, etc. This course will examine the ways in which Cervantes transformed these models to create what is considered by many the first "modern" novel in European history. Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 331: Baroque Desires

    According to Graciáns influential The Art of Worldly Wisdom (1647), it is essential "to have always something still to desire, that one may not be unhappy in his happiness." This course explores this curious conundrum--that perhaps real happiness lies in the unfulfillment of desire--through a number of "biggies," including Cervantes, Therese of Avila, John of the Cross, Garcilaso, Quevedo, Calderón, and the precursor of Nietzsche's Gay Science--Gracián himself. If by the end of the course you still do not understand Gracián, at least you will know why Mick Jagger "can't get no satisfaction."

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2014 · H. Huergo
  • SPAN 336: Genealogies of the Modern: Turn of the Century Latin America

    We will study the experience of literary modernity (1870-1910) in the context of the configuration of emergent cities, urban culture, mass media, technological innovation, the modernization of the figure of the writer, and the vicissitudes of modern bourgeois subjectivity. A key emphasis will be placed on the raid on the European artistic archive and its forms of subjectivity. Texts by Martí Darío, Rodó, Lugones, Silva, Gutiérrez, Májera, Nervo, Machado de Assis, and Agustini among others. Theoretical selections from Freud, Simmel, Benjamin, Corbain, Foucault, Montaldo, Molloy, Sarlo, and Rotker among others.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or equivalent 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 342: Latin American Theater: Nation, Power, Gender

    Introduction to key themes and modes of production in twentieth century theater in Latin America. We will read representative plays from established playwrights such as Rodolfo Usigli, Griselda Gambaro, Manuel Puig, Sabina Berman, Mario Vargas Llosa, Mario Benedetti, Ariel Dorfman, Susana Torres Molina among others. The course will be organized around themes of national and cultural identity, relations of power, and the (de)construction of gender. Students will be asked to put on scenes and develop areas of research. Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 349: Spanish Seminar in Madrid: Theory and Practice of Urban Life

    More than a study of the image of Madrid in Spanish literature, this course examines the actual experience of living in a cosmopolitan city through a variety of disciplines, including Urban Studies, Philosophy, Architecture, Sociology, and Spanish poetry and fiction.

    6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · H. Huergo
  • SPAN 350: Recent Trends in Latin American Narrative: Pop Culture and Testimony

    Postboom narratives question the very nature of telling stories, from Rigoberta Menchú's testimony of genocide to the virtual reality of MacOndo. Eduardo Galeano, Manuel Puig, and Elena Poniatowska are some of the writers we will examine, writers who combine fiction and reportage, recontextualize the novela rosa, or write an urban literature within a global context. What makes these new texts literature? How has the craft of author changed, and what constitutes a postmodern narrative discourse? Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above. 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 358: The Spanish Civil War

    Considered by many historians the beginning of the II World War, the Spanish Civil war served as the arena where the main ideologies of the twentieth century--Capitalism, Fascism, and Communism--first clashed. The result was not only one of the bloodiest wars in history, but also was of the most idealistic, with 40,000 volunteers from all over the world willing to die in defense of a country they did not even know. This course will explore the meaning of the war through a variety of mediums and disciplines, including literature, history, graphic arts, and films.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 360: Race and Nation in Caribbean Literature

    We will study the Caribbean as the space, par excellence, of imperial, racial and cultural intersections. With a special emphasis on literary production in the Spanish Caribbean, we will focus on the formation of hegemonic nationalist discourses that often silenced the region's great racial and cultural diversity. We will analyze symbolic and cultural constructions of power rationalized with complex racialized beliefs to sustain the social and political structures in these countries. We will read texts by José Martí, Juan Francisco Manzano, Lydia Cabrera, Nancy Morejón, Nicolás Guillén, and Derek Walcott among others.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 366: Jorge Luis Borges: Less a Man Than a Vast and Complex Literature

    Borges once said about Quevedo that he was less a man than a vast and complex literature. This phrase is probably the best definition for Borges as well. We will discuss the many writers encompassed by Borges: the vanguard writer, the poet, the detective short story writer, the fantastic story writer, the essayist. We will also study his many literary masks: H. Bustoc Domecq (the apocryphal writer he created with Bioy Casares) a pseudonym he used to write chronicles and detective stories. We will study his impact on contemporary writers and philosophers such as Foucault, Derrida, Roberto Bolaño, etc.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; offered Spring 2014 · J. Brioso
  • SPAN 371: Yours Truly: The Body of the Letter

    This course will focus on letters and their significance as acts of symbolic and material exchange, as objects that bear the mark of the bodily act of writing, and as a staging of the scene of writing itself. We will study different types of letters (love letters, secret letters, literary letters, letters imbedded in other texts, etc.), but always as the site of production of a modern and gendered self. Letters by: Flora Tristan, Victoria Ocampo, Teresa de la Parra, Virginia Woolf, Rosa Luxemburg, Simone de Beauvoir and theoretical texts by Monsiváis, Chartier, Bouver, Derrida, Deleuze and Guattari, among others.

    Prerequisites: Spanish 205 or above 6 credit; Arts and Literature, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Literary/Artistic Analysis, International Studies; not offered 2013–2014
  • SPAN 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff