Courses

Fall 2016

  • WGST 200: Gender, Power and the Pursuit of Knowledge

    In this course we will examine whether there are feminist ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminists to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? How can research relate to efforts for social change? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist researchers have dealt with them. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 265: Black Feminist Thought: The Everyday World

    When sociologist Dorothy Smith coined the phrase "The Everyday World as Problematic," she set about to argue for the importance of theorizing from one's everyday life. In this course we will explore the ways in which black feminists have used the everyday as a point of departure for their theorizing. We will draw on the many ways in black feminists produce knowledge (e.g. critical texts, fiction, plays, music, poetry). Further, as we examine how black feminists have theorized the "everyday," we will engage the many valences of the word "problematic," as a thing to be studied and as a locus of difficulty.

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2016 · M. Rowley
  • WGST 266: Caribbean Queer Matters: Exploration & Research

    Caribbean Queer Matters invites students to think about the complexities, contradictions and activist possibilities of gender non-conforming and same-gender desiring individuals in the English-speaking Caribbean. The course will serve as an incubator where students will develop the skills to understand and analyze these non-U.S. contexts, all the while foregrounding attention to the local, regard for difference and a commitment to issues of justice. The course will draw on a range of genres and disciplinary vantage points. Students will engage film, biographical narratives, music, critical texts, poetry, as well as the fields of Caribbean Studies, Women's Studies, Critical Race and LGBT Studies.

    6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · M. Rowley
  • WGST 285: Gender Violence & Feminist Self-Defense

    Around the globe, feminist advocacy networks and social movements have led efforts combating violence against women. Recently, a campus anti-rape movement has highlighted the prevalence of sexual assault against college women. This course will focus on the theories and praxis feminists have put forth to resist gender and sexual violence. We will explore cases of feminist self-defense in order to understand how it differs from militarized notions of self-defense, and examine how it supports initiatives for peace and conflict resolution. Class members will participate in self-defense programs and reflect on feminist theories of resistance in the context of personal experience.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2016 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · K. Bashore, S. Sippy

Winter 2017

  • WGST 110: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

    This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender structures our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, because gender is not a homogeneous category but is differentiated by class, race, sexualities, ethnicity, and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · A. Igra, I. Jusová
  • WGST 112: Introduction to LGBT/Queer Studies

    This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary examination of sexual desires, sexual orientations, and the concept of sexuality generally, with a particular focus on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities. The course will look specifically at how these identities interact with other phenomena such as government, family, and popular culture. In exploring sexual diversity, we will highlight the complexity and variability of sexualities, both across different historical periods, and in relation to identities of race, class, and ethnicity. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2017 · K. Bashore
  • WGST 241: India Program: Gender & Sexuality in India

    This course explores gender and sexuality as key institutions that structure and stratify Indian society through intersections with other systems of stratification (like class, caste, and region). We will focus on family and gender relations, heteronormativity, homosociality and queer subversions as well as feminism, women's and queer movements--situating these historically and regionally in South Asia. We will also consider how gender and sexuality in India have been represented in the western imagination. Toward the end of the course, we will pay close attention to the gendered and sexualized politics of globalization, economic development and tourism in India.

    6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2017 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · K. Bashore, S. Sippy

Spring 2017

  • WGST 110: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

    This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender structures our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, because gender is not a homogeneous category but is differentiated by class, race, sexualities, ethnicity, and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · A. Igra, I. Jusová
  • WGST 130: Politics of Sex

    The politics of sex are everywhere--in media, law, medicine, and everyday life. To say that sex is political is to imply that sex intersects with other interests--nation and market building, globalization, and so forth. In this course, we will explore various "sex panics," as they ask us to revisit the boundaries of the "normative" in relation to sex and its intersections with race, class, gender, sexuality, nation, and ability. Sex panics--and, as we'll also explore, "sex scandals" occasion not only the revision of discourses on sex but on identity, politics, and cultures more broadly.

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a curricular exploration requirement, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2017 · K. Bashore
  • WGST 310: Asian Mystiques Demystified

    This class will focus on the topic of Asian sexuality and gender, considering traditional, transnational, and transgressive representations of Asian sexualities, femininities, masculinities and bodies. Often associated with paradoxical images of sensuality, spirituality, repression, and femininity, Asian sexuality has a long history, shaped by enduring colonial imaginaries and our transnational, capitalist present. Tracing a genealogy of Asian mystiques, we will study classical sources that have served as "prooftexts" for these images, and will then focus our attention on Asian literature, film, art, religious traditions, and social movements that have produced their own, often alternative, conceptions of Asian sexualities and gender. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, International Studies; offered Spring 2017 · S. Sippy
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017 · K. Bashore, S. Sippy