Courses

Fall 2013

  • WGST 200: Gender, Power and the Pursuit of Knowledge

    In this course we will examine whether there are feminist ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminists to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? How can research relate to efforts for social change? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist researchers have dealt with them.

    6 credit; Social Sciences, Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2013 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff

Winter 2014

  • WGST 110: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

    This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender structures our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, because gender is not a homogeneous category but is differentiated by class, race, sexualities, ethnicity, and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender.

    6 credit; Humanities, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Winter 2014 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff

Spring 2014

  • WGST 210: Sexuality and Religious Controversies in the United States and Beyond

    From pulpits to political campaigns, notions of sexuality are deployed in religious discourse to develop definitions of morality, ethics, family, marriage, gender, citizenship, civil liberties, righteousness and sinfulness. Religious concepts have also been used as creative tools to repress, liberate, legislate, and re-vision various conceptions of sexuality. This course will examine the ways in which religious ideologies, theologies, motivations, and practices function in both public and private contexts in debates over a range of topics, including homosexuality, abortion, and public comportment. We will consider questions about how ideas of sexuality are established as normative through scriptural, ritual, and rhetorical devices.

    6 credit; Humanities, Recognition and Affirmation of Difference Requirement, Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Spring 2014 · S. Sippy
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    6 credit; Does not fulfill a distribution requirement; offered Fall 2013, Winter 2014, Spring 2014 · Staff