Courses

Fall 2015

  • WGST 112: Introduction to LGBT/Queer Studies

    This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary examination of sexual desires, sexual orientations, and the concept of sexuality generally, with a particular focus on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities. The course will look specifically at how these identities interact with other phenomena such as government, family, and popular culture. In exploring sexual diversity, we will highlight the complexity and variability of sexualities, both across different historical periods, and in relation to identities of race, class, and ethnicity. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015, Spring 2016 · E. Kumar
  • WGST 200: Gender, Power and the Pursuit of Knowledge

    In this course we will examine whether there are feminist ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminists to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? How can research relate to efforts for social change? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist researchers have dealt with them. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Fall 2015 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 220: LGBTQ Movements in the U.S.

    In this course we will examine what constitutes an LGBTQ social movement in the U.S. today. We will analyze the popular understandings of LGBTQ social movements by linking the context, goals, and outcomes of movements to the dynamics of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, immigration status, and geography. Our goal will be to understand the ways that LGBTQ social movements have helped influence as well as been influenced by existing social and governmental institutions. How have these relationships determined the perceived legitimacy of such movements? We will also examine several contemporary issues that have inspired LGBTQ organizing and advocacy. 6 credit; Social Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015 · E. Kumar
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016

Winter 2016

  • WGST 110: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

    This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender structures our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, because gender is not a homogeneous category but is differentiated by class, race, sexualities, ethnicity, and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry; offered Winter 2016 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 234: Feminist Theory

    Feminism has to do with changing the world. We will explore feminist debates about changing the world using a historical framework to situate feminist theories in the context of the philosophical and political thought of specific time periods and cultures. Thus, we will follow feminist theories as they challenged, critiqued, subverted and revised liberalism, Marxism, existentialism, socialism, anarchism, critical race theories, multiculturalism, postmodernism and post-colonialism. We will focus on how theory emerges from and informs matters of practice. We will ask: What counts as theory? Who does it? How is it institutionalized? Who gets to ask the questions and to provide the answers? 6 credit; Social Inquiry, International Studies; offered Winter 2016 · K. Bloomer
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016

Spring 2016

  • WGST 112: Introduction to LGBT/Queer Studies

    This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary examination of sexual desires, sexual orientations, and the concept of sexuality generally, with a particular focus on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities. The course will look specifically at how these identities interact with other phenomena such as government, family, and popular culture. In exploring sexual diversity, we will highlight the complexity and variability of sexualities, both across different historical periods, and in relation to identities of race, class, and ethnicity. 6 credit; Humanistic Inquiry, Intercultural Domestic Studies; offered Fall 2015, Spring 2016 · E. Kumar
  • WGST 205: The Politics of Women's Health

    This course will explore the politics of women's health from the perspective of women of different races, ethnicities, classes and sexual orientations in the U.S. The organization of the health care system and women's activism (as consumers and health care practitioners) shall frame our explorations of menstruation, sexuality, nutrition, body image, fertility control, pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause. We will cover basic facts about the female body and pay particular attention to adjustments the body makes during physiological events (i.e. menstruation, sexual and reproductive activity, and menopause). We will focus on the medicalization of these processes and explore alternatives to this medicalization. Prerequisites: Women's and Gender Studies 110 6 credit; Intercultural Domestic Studies, Social Inquiry; offered Spring 2016 · M. Sehgal
  • WGST 400: Integrative Exercise

    1-6 credit; S/NC; offered Fall 2015, Winter 2016, Spring 2016