Audio/Video Archives

Beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year, convocation audio files are archived separately from video files. View the audio archives.

Convocation: Cheryl Klein ’00

Created 23 April 2010; Published 27 April 2010

Cheryl Klein (Carleton Class of 2000) is the senior editor at Arthur A. Levine Books / Scholastic, where she has worked since her graduation from Carleton. She has edited an extensive list of picture books and novels for young readers, including Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork, winner of the Schneider Family Book Award for Teens; A Curse Dark as Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce, winner of the ALA's William Morris Award for a Young Adult Debut Novel; Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit by Nahoko Uehashi, translated by Cathy Hirano, winner of the Mildred Batchelder Award for Translation; and My Senator and Me: A Dog's Eye View of Washington, D.C. by Senator Ted Kennedy, illustrated by David Small. She also served as the continuity editor for the last three books of the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. Assuming the role of the series' chief "Potterologist," as Time magazine dubbed her, Klein was responsible for ensuring that the elaborate world J.K. Rowling had created—with a complex cast of characters, a thorough set of magical rules, and a language of its own—was as consistent as possible. A former Carletonian copy editor, Klein is in her dream job, working with a diverse and talented group of authors and illustrators on an equally diverse array of projects. The title of her presentation was "The Wand Chooses the Wizard: On Carleton, Children’s Books, and Creating Yourself."

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  • Cheryl Klein, Class of 2000
    Created 23 April 2010; Published 27 April 2010
    Convocation: Cheryl Klein ’00

    Cheryl Klein (Carleton Class of 2000) is the senior editor at Arthur A. Levine Books / Scholastic, where she has worked since her graduation from Carleton. She has edited an extensive list of picture books and novels for young readers, including Marcelo in the Real World by Francisco X. Stork, winner of the Schneider Family Book Award for Teens; A Curse Dark as Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce, winner of the ALA's William Morris Award for a Young Adult Debut Novel; Moribito: Guardian of the Spirit by Nahoko Uehashi, translated by Cathy Hirano, winner of the Mildred Batchelder Award for Translation; and My Senator and Me: A Dog's Eye View of Washington, D.C. by Senator Ted Kennedy, illustrated by David Small. She also served as the continuity editor for the last three books of the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. Assuming the role of the series' chief "Potterologist," as Time magazine dubbed her, Klein was responsible for ensuring that the elaborate world J.K. Rowling had created—with a complex cast of characters, a thorough set of magical rules, and a language of its own—was as consistent as possible. A former Carletonian copy editor, Klein is in her dream job, working with a diverse and talented group of authors and illustrators on an equally diverse array of projects. The title of her presentation was "The Wand Chooses the Wizard: On Carleton, Children’s Books, and Creating Yourself."

  • Ronald Heifetz
    Created 16 April 2010; Published 22 April 2010
    Convocation: Ronald Heifetz

    Ronald Heifetz is one of the world's leading authorities on leadership. In contemporary America, a traditionally respectful and idealistic view of people in positions of power is changing. High-profile scandals and abuses of power have undermined the public’s perception of his leaders in both the political and business worlds, realigning the very ideal of leadership. What sort of behavior makes for effective leadership in today’s world? The work of Heifetz provides insight into this question. The founding director of the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, Heifetz is renowned worldwide for his seminal work on both the practice and teaching of leadership. Co-founder and principal of Cambridge Leadership Associates, Heifetz consults extensively in the United States and abroad, with clients who include senior executives at major corporations, leaders of non-profits, and heads of nations. His widely acclaimed book, Leadership Without Easy Answers, is currently beyond its thirteenth printing and has been translated into many languages.

  • Norma Ramos
    Created 9 April 2010; Published 12 April 2010
    Convocation: Norma Ramos

    Norma Ramos is a longstanding public interest attorney and social justice activist. She currently serves as the Co-Executive Director of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women, which is the first organization to fight against human trafficking internationally, now in its twenty-first year. She writes and speaks extensively about the sexual exploitation of women and girls as a core global injustice. An eco-feminist, Ramos links the worldwide inequality and destruction of women to the destruction of the environment. The title of her presentation was "Ending Human Trafficking in Our Lifetime."

  • Daniel Seddiqui
    Created 2 April 2010; Published 12 April 2010
    Convocation: Daniel Seddiqui

    Daniel Seddiqui has recently completed his mission to work 50 different jobs in 50 states. He has been everything from a rodeo announcer in South Dakota, a model in North Carolina, a marine biologist in Washington, to a border patrol agent in Arizona. Why would anyone put themselves through such a grueling experience? Seddiqui's goal was to help Americans understand each other's lives, respect each other's hard work and stimulate peoples' curiosity about different lifestyles. Unaware of what life was like outside his "bubble", he was on a mission to explore the many careers, environments, and cultures that America has to offer. To explore the lifestyle that each state has to offer, he chose one career per state – a career that is popular and represented that state. Through his website Livingthemap.com, Seddiqui chronicled his cross-country adventure, as he worked as an insurance broker in Connecticut, a golf caddie in Hawaii, a sugar maker in Vermont, and an auto mechanic in Michigan, just to name a few of his many 'professions'. The title of his presentation was "Crossing Borders."

  • Patrice Gaines
    Created 26 February 2010; Published 5 March 2010
    Convocation: Patrice Gaines

    Patrice Gaines is an award winning journalist and former Washington Post reporter who has proven that you cannot judge a book by its cover. She grew up a self-hating young woman, entering one abusive relationship after another. She became a heroin user, went to prison for possession of the drug and was raped and beaten before she began her long contemplative journey to change. She later began her journalism career at the Miami News, and worked for sixteen years as a reporter with the Washington Post, where she carved a niche for herself focusing on human-interest stories that reflected current issues. During this time she spent six years researching a notorious Washington, D.C. murder for which eight young men remain incarcerated. Her work on the story raised serious doubts about the guilt of the youths and showed readers the absolute power wielded by police and prosecutors. This story plus her own experience with the judicial and penal systems sparked her to begin speaking on the states of those systems today, including the high rate of incarceration among minorities and the poor, questionable police practices, prosecutors with too much power, and the weeding out of bad lawyers. She also offers an engaging look at the power of the press, told from an insider point of view. The title of her presentation was "How We Can All Be Free: Prison Reform in the 21st Century."

  • Lisa Dodson
    Created 19 February 2010; Published 5 March 2010
    Convocation: Lisa Dodson

    A research professor in Boston College’s Department of Sociology, Dr. Lisa Dodson has spent the last twenty-five years listening to everyday people talk about their lives and their place in the society. She is widely known for her policy research on low-wage families and has testified in U.S. Congressional hearings and to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, arguing for better work and family policies. Her newest book The Moral Underground examines the profound harm of a deeply stratified economy.

  • E. Patrick Johnson
    Created 5 February 2010; Published 12 February 2010
    Convocation: E. Patrick Johnson

    E. Patrick Johnson is Professor, Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Performance Studies and Professor in African American Studies at Northwestern University. A scholar and artist, Johnson has performed nationally and internationally and has published widely in the area of race, gender, sexuality and performance. His book Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity has won several awards, including the Lilla A. Heston Award, the Errol Hill Book Award, and was a finalist for the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. The title of his presentation was "In Search of My Roots/Routes: Researching and Performing Sweet Tea."

  • Created 29 January 2010; Published 12 February 2010
    Convocation: Alexandra Jamieson

    Alexandra Jamieson is the author of "The Great American Detox Diet" and is perhaps best known for her appearance in the documentary film "Super Size Me." A holistic health counselor and vegan chef, Jamieson works with clients who have been diagnosed with cancer, diabetes, food allergies, infertility, asthma, and chronic fatigue syndrome. She provides nutritional and lifestyle counseling and support in a fun and empowering way.

  • Created 22 January 2010; Published 12 February 2010
    Convocation: Stephanie Kinnunen

    Stephanie Kinnunen is CEO and Co-Founder of NEED magazine, the first independent magazine dedicated solely to global and domestic humanitarian issues. NEED magazine creates exposure for humanitarian aid via an educational, artistic, visual narrative of human stories, both around the world and domestically. This exposure offers an innovative and dynamic approach to building awareness and increasing support for relief organizations and Humanitarian Aid. NEED magazine does not have a political agenda, but rather seeks to inspire volunteer work by telling the stories of people currently doing humanitarian work and accompanying those stories with outstanding photography. Their motto is "We are not out to save the world but to tell the stories of those who are."

  • Created 15 January 2010; Published 12 February 2010
    Convocation: Lowell Bergman

    Lowell Bergman is a producer/correspondent for the PBS documentary series “Frontline” and contributes investigative reports to The New York Times. As a professor at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, Bergman has for over 15 years taught a seminar dedicated to investigative reporting. His far-ranging projects have included investigations into the war on drugs, the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, the credit card and gold industries, Al Qaeda's recent attacks in Europe, and the domestic energy crisis. Additionally, he has worked across the media spectrum – print, broadcast and electronic media – and along the way won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service and every major award in broadcasting, including numerous Emmys, Peabodys, and a Writers Guild Award. Bergman has noted that the news business, as is its wont, was ahead of everyone else. It was collapsing long before the stock market went into free fall and the economy teetered on a new Depression. Today the news business is struggling to survive, if not as a profitable business, as a profession that serves the public interest. In his presentation, Bergman offered a look back at how we got here and a prediction about "The Future of News."

  • Created 6 November 2009; Published 10 November 2009
    Convocation: Luci Tapahonso

    Luci Tapahonso is an award-winning Navajo poet and short story author. Navajo was her first language but she learned English before starting school at the Navajo Methodist Mission in Farmington, New Mexico. She majored in English at the University of New Mexico, as an undergraduate and a graduate student, and is now Professor of English at the University of Arizona in Tucson, where she teaches Poetry Writing and American Indian Literature. She is the author of three children’s books and five books of poetry. She structures prose and poetry that are mixtures of family stories, Navajo culture and legendary tales. Utilizing many of the same storytelling techniques used by many Native American writers, she highlights aspects of her life that are important to her and has shaped the woman she is today. Unlike most Native American writers, however, Tapahonso’s writing is a translation from original work she has created in her tribe’s native tongue. Her work includes original songs and chants designed for performance. For this reason, her English work is strongly rhythmic and uses syntactical structures unusual in English language poetry. The title of her presentation was "A Radiant Curve: Stories and Poems."

  • Created 30 October 2009; Published 28 October 2009
    Convocation: Jonathan Morduch

    Jonathan Morduch is Professor of Public Policy and Economics at New York University's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. His research focuses on international development, poverty and financial access. He is the Managing Director of the Financial Access Initiative, a research consortium of leading development economists that aims to expand access to financial services for low-income individuals in developing countries. He has been chair of the United Nations Committee on Poverty Statistics and a member of the U.N. Advisors Group on Inclusive Financial Sectors. He has served as an advisor to the United Nations, World Economic Forum, Pro Mujer, and the Grameen Foundation. He is a member of the editorial boards of the World Bank Economic Review, Journal of Economic Perspectives, and Journal of Globalization and Development. Co-author of The Economics of Microfinance and Portfolios of the Poor: How the World's Poor Live on $2 a Day, Morduch has taught on the Economics faculty at Harvard University, and has held fellowships or visiting positions at Stanford, Princeton, and the University of Tokyo. The title of his presentation was "How the World's Poor Live on $2 a Day."

  • Created 23 October 2009; Published 28 October 2009
    Convocation: John Harris '85

    John Harris (Carleton Class of 1985) stumbled into journalism during his freshman year at Carleton when a friend asked him to write a couple of articles for The Carletonian. He did, and the effect was instantaneous. Suddenly, he was certain what he wanted to do in life. For more than two decades, Harris worked for the Washington Post, serving as White House reporter. In an effort to break the traditional journalism mold, in 2006 he co-founded The Politico (print newspaper) and Politico.com where he now serves as editor-in-chief. The title of his presentation was "Barack Obama v. the Freak Show: Politics and Media on the Wild Frontier."

  • Created 16 October 2009; Published 28 October 2009
    Convocation: Mark Bauerlein

    Mark Bauerlein is Professor of English at Emory University where he has taught since 1989, with a two-and-a-half year break in 2003-05 to serve as the Director, Office of Research and Analysis, at the National Endowment for the Arts, where he oversaw studies about culture and American life. He earned his doctorate in English at UCLA in 1988. His publications include Whitman and the American Idiom (1991), Literary Criticism: An Autopsy (1997), The Pragmatic Mind: Explorations in the Psychology of Belief (1997), Negrophobia: A Race Riot in Atlanta, 1906 (2001), Civil Rights Chronicle: The African American Struggle for Freedom (2003), and A Handbook of Literary Terms (2004). Apart from his scholarly work, he publishes in popular periodicals such as The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, The Washington Post, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. His latest book attracted national buzz even in advance of its publication. Bauerlein’s provocative, deeply researched book finds ignorance in abundance and the Internet an all too enticing web of social networking that further insulates youth from their intellectual development. He contends that the technology that was supposed to make young adults more astute, diversify their tastes, and improve their minds had the opposite effect. The title of the book, and the title of his presentation, is "The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future."

  • Created 2 October 2009; Published 28 October 2009
    Convocation: Drew Miller '81

    Drew Miller (Carleton Class of 1981) brings locally grown talent with a global reputation. His Minneapolis-based band Boiled in Lead have for over 26 years been innovators in bringing folk music kicking and screaming to rock audiences (and rock music to screaming folk audiences!) Performing on fiddle, guitars, bass and percussion, the players improvise freely yet stay in sync, playing a vital mix of original and traditional material—a blend of Irish folk, American folk rock, and world music. The group and the individual musicians have won over 20 Minnesota Music Awards, and toured throughout the United States and in Europe. The convocation presentation of lecture-and-demonstration was followed in the evening with a public concert.

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