Farewells

Notices of the passing of members of the Carleton community

  • Roger Kirchner

    Roger Kirchner

    April 2, 2015

    Roger Kirchner, 78, died at home on Tuesday, March 31st. A brilliant 1958 Carleton graduate, Roger returned to campus to teach Mathematics here for 38 years. He began as an Instructor in Mathematics in 1962 and retired as an emeriti Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science in 2000. Colleagues describe Roger as a mathematician's mathematician. He was broadly trained and interested, the person other faculty could go to for help in almost any area of math. Roger was an inventive teacher, helping students learn how mathematicians think and approach problems, and thus preparing them very well for advanced work in math. He was dependable and supportive of all the activities in the department, a cohesive force in a department admired for its togetherness.

  • Ross Shoger

    Ross Shoger

    March 18, 2015

    Ross Shoger, age 85, died on March 16th after a long illness caused by a severe stroke in 2010. Ross taught Biology at Carleton for 35 years, coming to Carleton in 1959 as an Instructor in Zoology, retiring in 1992 as an Emeritus Professor of Biology, and continuing to teach courses for two more years. Ross was a rigorous but popular teacher, communicating his curiosity and awe of the natural world to students with great care and humor. For many years, Ross was also the pre-med advisor, mentoring hundreds of students who went on to become doctors. He stayed in touch with many alumni, sometimes traveling widely to visit them.

  • Wayne McLean Carver

    Wayne Carver

    March 17, 2015

    Wayne Carver, age 91, died on Sunday, March 15th at home after a long illness. Wayne taught English at Carleton for 38 years, beginning as an instructor in 1954 and retiring as the William Laird Professor of the Liberal Arts in 1992. Significantly in his life, Wayne grew up in Utah and was a life long member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, "but a dissenter!" He received his BA from Kenyon College. Wayne helped generations of Carleton students (including this one) discover the beauty and depths of poetry and literature. In addition to teaching, he helped to launch the teacher certification program and the American Studies Program, moving parts of the college toward interdisciplinary studies.

  • Qiguang Zhao

    Qiguang Zhao

    March 14, 2015

    Professor Qiguang Zhao died of a heart attack on Friday, March 13th, while in Florida. He was 67 years old. The Burton and Lily Levin Professor of Chinese, Qiguang came to Carleton in 1987 and single-handedly launched the Chinese language program. He initiated the Chinese Studies in China off-campus program in Tianjin and now Shanghai, leading the program more than 10 times. Qiguang was a favorite professor of many students, teaching a popular spring course on the "Taoist Way of Health and Longevity," which included leading Tai Chi on the Bald Spot. He also taught courses in advanced Chinese, such as Chinese Poetry and Classical Chinese. He often taught using "huajing," drawing lively cartoons that illustrated his points. Qiguang loved watching students grow in understanding of themselves and the world through experiencing another culture. But his knowledge and intelligence, kindness and generosity, and willingness to think with them about the big questions of life, were as much a factor in students' growth and learning.

  • Diethelm Prowe

    Diethelm Prowe

    March 9, 2015

    Diethelm (Diet) Prowe died peacefully on Saturday, March 7th at the age of 74. Diet taught modern European history at Carleton for 42 years, beginning as an instructor in 1966 and retiring as the Laird Bell Professor of History in 2008. Diet was passionate about the intellectual development of young people, and in addition to teaching, he was also the pre-law advisor and Mellon minority student program director. He contributed to scholarly work in the study of Germany, focused on post-WWII Germany, the process of democratization, and later the appearance of the new Radical Right. He was thoughtful and well organized—characteristics which aided his editing of the German Studies Review journal from 2001-2011. Diet was kind and generous to his students and colleagues, a strong and gentle mentor to many. 

  • Yale Pfoutz

    Charles Yale Pfoutz

    February 16, 2015

    Charles Yale Pfoutz, age 90, died on Saturday, February 14th at the Three Links Care Center in Northfield. Yale worked at Carleton for 30 years, beginning in 1959 as the director of non-academic personnel, and then becoming the assistant business manager, assistant treasurer, business manager, personnel director, and benefits administrator. He retired in 1989. Yale is described as being a great colleague, dependable and hard working, quietly keeping many aspects of the college running smoothly. His dedication and good work continue to shape the college.