Your Gifts at Work

  • The entrance to Jō Ryō En

    Although it is named Jō Ryō En, “The Garden of Quiet Listening,” Carleton’s Japanese garden is often filled with laughter—especially on Thursdays. That’s when the volunteers who care for the trees and plants gather in the garden’s tea hut for coffee and treats before beginning their assigned tasks. Ranging in age from retiree to preschooler, the volunteers fondly refer to Jō Ryō En as a place of joy and contentment.

  • Fall 2016 will bring one of the largest classes to Carleton ever.

    Welcoming one of the largest incoming classes Carleton has ever had will be a jubilant occasion this fall—and it will also present campus with a few challenges and a greater need for flexibility in budgeting.

    “It’s hard to know on a daily or even monthly basis what the needs of the college are going to be, so allowing the leadership to be nimble and flexible with budgeting is important," says Alumni Annual Fund Board Director Betsy Sylvester ’06. 



  • Women's rugby is one of many club sports that benefit from CAI.

    Conceived in 2009, the Carleton Athletics Initiative (CAI) has helped campus find silver linings in a few difficult times.

    When seven inches of rain gutted Laird Stadium in the fall of 2010, the building’s insurance coverage would have restored the stadium only to its pre-flood state—which was virtually the same as its 1927 opening. That wasn’t good enough for a group of former Carleton athletes.

  • Chris Griffin '17

    Passionate Sole

    December 3, 2015

    Ever since his first job shining his father’s shoes, Chris Griffin ’17 has been passionate about footwear.

    “You can tell a lot about a person by their shoes,” he says. “It’s an important part of how people represent themselves.”

  • Vicky Wu '17

    Vicky Wu ’17 set off for her externship with high hopes but few preconceptions. She knew externing at NSW Corp. in Portland, Ore., with Carleton parent Laird McCulloch P’12, P’15 and Kyle Raines would teach her about real estate investments. She hoped it might give her food for thought about a career path. And she assumed, like many do, it resemble job shadowing—simply observing professionals going about their days.

    She was wrong.

  • Kyle Schiller '17

    All the wild dreams students have—they really can come true, says Kyle Schiller ’17.

    Schiller, for example, dreamed of going to Japan to work on an organic farm. It was one of those crazy things he and his friends talked about late at nights, laughingly pondering what life would be like in a place completely different from Carleton.

  • Issa Wilson '18, recipient of 2013-2014 Herb '73 and Barbara Fritch Scholars Program

    As a top swimmer and a top student in high school, Issa Wilson got used to people telling him he was special. In fact, he often agreed with them.

    That’s what made his first term at Carleton so rough.

  • Alexandra Mayn '15, recipient of F. Keith Underbrink '56 Endowed Fund for Global Initiatives

    Alexandra Mayn, better known as Sasha, always knew she’d need to leave home to get the education she wanted. A native of Kazan, Russia, Sasha loves the classics, Latin and linguistics. But in Russia, she says, education emphasizes memorizing facts over cultivating skills.