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May 2011

Thursday, May 5th

  • Sebastian Meyer '02 -- Photography On the Edge
    • Sebastian Meyer ('02) visits Carleton to speak about his work and career path. After graduating from Carleton with a major in French, Sebastian worked in France and London, moving gradually into professional photography. He now operates principally in northern Iraq, where he has set up the country's first photographic agency. A winner of numerous photography awards, Sebastian has published in top-flight venues (Time Magazine, The New York Times, The Guardian, The Sunday Times, and more). Sponsored by Global Engagement, French & Francophone Studies, Viz, and Art & Art History. A micro-exhibit of his work will be on display on 3rd LDC in April and May; more at http://www.sebmeyer.com
    • 4:30 pm, Boliou 104

Friday, May 6th

  • “Transnational/Transcultural/Transgender Performances of Identity” with 2Fik and Denis M. Provencher, Phd.
    • Act 1. 2fik “Shooting identity: writing a new self” Act 2. Denis Provencher “Coming out à l'oriental : Maghrebi-French performances of gender, sexuality and religion” 2Fik is a Moroccan-French performance artist based in Montreal. He is an interdisciplinary artist that works in photography, video, and live performance in order to capture the tension of various identities. Provencher is an Associate Professor of French Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and author of Queer French: Globalization, Language, and Sexual Civilization.
    • 6:00 pm, Boliou 104

Monday, May 16th

  • Dialogos II: Gender and Identity in Contemporary East Asian Cinema
    • Women's Images and National Identity in Contemporary Chinese Cinema – Hong Zeng, Assistant Professor, Asian Languages and Literatures Masculinity and Minority Voice in Japanese Cinema – Noboru Tomonari, Masculinity and Minority Voice in Japanese Cinema, Associate Professor, Asian Languages and Literatures . Sponsored by the Humanities Center.
    • 4:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

Wednesday, May 18th

  • Ragamala performance of Sthree
    • Inspired by Silappatikaram (The Anklet), the national epic of the Tamil people of southeastern India, Ragamala Dance presents Sthree, a stunning convergence of dance, music and text that brings to the present the beauty of the Sangam Period of history.
    • 7:00 pm, Chapel

Thursday, May 19th

  • Family and Monarchy: Stuart Concepts of Dynastic Reproduction
    • Malcolm Smuts, Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts in Boston, will speak on the topic of "Family and Monarchy: Stuart Concepts of Dynastic Reproduction"
    • 5:00 pm, Boliou 104 (handicapped accessible)
  • Documentary as Symptom and Therapy: Montage, Moral Tropes and the Framing of Spanish Historical Memory
    • Dr. Faber was born and raised in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where he studied Spanish. He is Professor and Chair of the Dept. of Hispanic Studies at Oberlin College, and he received his doctorate from the University of California, Davis. He is also the author of "Exile and Cultural Hegemony: Spanish Exiles in Mexico" (Vanderbilt, 2002), and "Anglo-American Hispanists and the Spanish Civil War"(Palgrave, 2008), as well as some fort articles on Spanish and Latin American literature, history and politics. In 2000 he won the George Watt Essay Prize in the graduate category, and has been on the ALBA board since 2004. He currently serves on the Executive Committee and chairs the Watt Prize jury.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

September 2011

Tuesday, September 20th

Thursday, September 22nd

  • "Un Prophète Jacques Audiard 2009
    • Malik, the 19-year-old French-Arab criminal vividly portrayed by Tahar Rahim enters prison as an uneducated naïf. But by the time he leaves jail, he will know how to read—and how to kill. Jacques Audiard’s intricate study of the bloody rules and rituals behind bars never once glorifies the shocking violence that becomes a rite of passage for Malik, who, friendless, feels he must do the savage bidding of a ferocious Corsican crime boss in exchange for protection. Instead, the director (sometimes referred to as the “French Scorsese”) examines prison as its own specific social system, its corruption, cronyism, and racism a reflection of France at large. As Malik begins to defy the Corsican overlord and make decisions of his own, he becomes drawn to another Muslim inmate who teaches him how to read and write. For as much as we cheer Malik’s small victories on his slow road to redemption, he remains a deliberately ambiguous hero— one who will always have copious blood on his hands.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema

Friday, September 23rd

  • Imagining America Conference
    • This site visit will examine four different models of supporting local arts to strengthen rural communities,and showcase the work of artists, arts organizations, and colleges and universities that contribute to building vital rural communities. The projects come from three communities -- Northfield and Winona, Minnesota, and Meadville, Pennsylvania. Site visits will include an exhibition of photos taken by students, faculty, staff, and community members about learning beyond the classroom and celebrating community connections – at a new arts center at Carleton College, and a visit to the Northfield Arts Guild, a 50-year-old organization dedicated to visual and performance arts.
    • 1:00 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity, Large Conference Room
  • ACE Event - Weaving a Sustainable Food Web: Connecting Colleges and Community
    • 5:30 pm, Severance Great Hall

Tuesday, September 27th

  • A Demonstration and Conversation with artist Anil Chaitya Vangad of Ganjad Village, India
    • The Life and Art of the Indigenous Warli People of India: A Demonstration and Conversation with artist Anil Chaitya Vangad of Ganjad Village, India. The indigenous Warli people of rural western India revere the land as the infinitely creative energy of nature. Their dynamic folk paintings - traditionally done in rice paste on the mud walls of their homes - use a richly textured pictorial language to celebrate the divine balance of a life lived in meaningful coexistence with the natural world.
    • 12:00 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity, Room 148
  • Honor, Shame, Family & Gender--Cinematic Representations of Middle East Societies between Tradition & Modernity
    • Eight selected films (Turkish, Palestinian, Egyptian and Iranian--all with English subtitles) will be presented and accompanied by short introductions and Q&A after screening of each film. Coordinator: Prof. Avraham Sela
    • 6:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • L'Illusioniste -Sylvain Chomet - 2010
    • Sylvain Chomet’s delightful follow-up to 2003’s The Triplets of Belleville is another exquisitely animated film, one based on an unproduced script by the French comic genius Jacques Tati (which was given to Chomet by Tati’s own daughter). The Illusionist is set in the early 1960s, the time when Tati wrote the screenplay after his huge success with Mon Oncle (1958). As a homage to the source material, Chomet’s title character is the spitting image of Tati. This middle-aged, slightly stoop-shouldered magician is upstaged by his rabbit during performances in Paris; at his shows his London, the Illusionist can’t begin to compete with a wildly popular proto-Beatles band. But he finds far more appreciative audiences in small pubs in Scotland—and makes a devoted teenage friend, Alice, a poor cleaning girl who follows him to Edinburgh. The two form a touching father-daughter bond, with the Illusionist determined to secretly provide Alice with the nice clothes she so admires—finery that isn’t procured through magic, but through a series of funny odd jobs that the conjurer takes. Though neither the magician nor his young charge speaks each other’s language, The Illusionist, like Tati’s work, beautifully shows the ways people understand each other nonverbally.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema

October 2011

Monday, October 3rd

  • 'The Other Night Sky', followed by skygazing in Central Park
    • Artist, writer, experimental geographer Trevor Paglen has been exposing the secret activities of the U.S. military and intelligence agencies over the last eight years in books and large-scale landscape photographs. These 'Other Night Sky' images reveal secret spy satellites and other covert military operations.
    • 6:00 pm, Cinema, Weitz Center for Creativity; Central Park

Tuesday, October 4th

Wednesday, October 5th

  • Brush up on your Yiddish!
    • Karsten Troyke will be giving a lesson on understanding Yiddish. Sponsored by the Christopher U. Light Lecture.
    • 4:30 pm, LDC 104

Thursday, October 6th

  • Reflections: What Matters to Me and Why
    • The Reflections series of talks on life, work and meaning continues this fall with a talk by Professor Seth Greenberg. Lunch will be provided. Cosponsored with EthIC.
    • 12:00 pm, Library Athenaeum
  • Karsten Troyke & Trio Spreefalter
    • Karsten Troyke is one of the most well‐known singers and interpreters of Yiddish songs in Europe. Based in Berlin, he has performed throughout Europe and Israel and is featured on numerous CDs. Here tonight at Carleton under the auspices of the Christopher U. Light Lectureship
    • 7:00 pm, Chapel
  • White Material - Claire Denis - 2009
    • Marking the first collaboration between two titans of French cinema—director Claire Denis and actress Isabelle Huppert—White Material unfolds as a fever dream, a haunting, enigmatic look at the horrors of colonialism’s legacy, a subject that Denis first explored in her semiautobiographical debut feature, Chocolat (1988). Set in an unnamed African country during an unspecified time, White Material centers on Maria Vial, a coffee-plantation owner who is blindly determined to continue her business while civil war rages on around her. Chaos engulfs the nation, but Maria implores her workers, many of whom have already fled, to stay and harvest the coffee crop. Amid the increasingly violent anarchy, an injured rebel leader known only as “the Boxer” takes refuge at Maria’s farm; she offers him assistance but then becomes too distracted by her obsession to harvest the beans. Maria’s folly—though she’s a native Frenchwoman who immigrated to Africa to exploit the land, she proudly distinguishes herself from “dirty whites”—is matched by the sheer madness of child soldiers roaming the country, rifles in one hand, stuffed animals in the other.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema

Friday, October 7th

Monday, October 10th

  • Realism and the Reality of Blood
    • Welcome to Latin American Studies! Come to the Latin American Studies welcome reception. Come share your abroad experience with other students who were in Latin American last year and learn about the program, the Brazil ACM exchange, and all things Latin American on campus. The reception will follow the talk by professor Durão. Professor Fabio Durão, UNICAMP (Brazil) When: Monday, October 10 at 5pm the Athenaeum Reception to begin at 6:00pm. Sponsored by Latin American Studies Dept., Spanish Dept., The Humanities Center, and the Dean of the College Office.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • Public talk, Dr. Fabio Durão, Towards a Model of Inclusive Exclusion: Marginal Subjectivation in Rio de Janeiro
    • Towards a Model of Inclusive Exclusion: Marginal Subjectivation in Rio de Janeiro Gould Library Athenaeum: Welcome to Latin American Studies! Come to the Latin American Studies welcome reception. Come share your abroad experience with other students who were in Latin American last year and learn about the program, the Brazil ACM exchange, and all things Latin American on campus. The reception will follow the talk by Professor Durão. Professor Fabio Durão, UNICAMP (Brazil) When: Monday, October 10 at 5pm the Athenaeum Reception to begin at 6:00pm. Sponsored by Latin American Studies Dept., Spanish Dept., The Humanities Center, and the Dean of the College Office.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

Tuesday, October 11th

  • LTC Lunch: Indigineity and the Holocaust as Global Discourses; Dialogos Faculty Research Talk
    • What happens when one people's specific experience is appropriated by other people in other places to describe their own struggles? This talk examines how Native Americans and Palestinians have appropriated the Jewish narrative of the Holocaust to characterize their sufferings, while Jewish Israelis and Palestinians have usurped the language of indigeneity to describe their respective situations.
    • 11:45 am, Weitz Center for Creativity
  • Public talk, Professor Tim Beach, Environmental History of the Maya
    • Environmental History of the Maya: Impacts, Landesque Capital and Collapse, public talk to be presented by Professor Tim Beach, Geography and Geoscience, Cinco Hermanos Cahir in Environment and International Affairs, Director of Center for Environment, Georgetown University. The talk will address the main drivers and evidence for Maya environmental history, landesque capital development by the Maya, and the regional collapses and transitions in the Mayan world. Sponsored by the Environmental Studies Program, Geology, the History and SoAn Departments, and The Humanities Center.
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 305
  • Honor, Shame, Family & Gender--Cinematic Representations of Middle East Societies between Tradition & Modernity
    • Eight selected films (Turkish, Palestinian, Egyptian and Iranian--all with English subtitles) will be presented and accompanied by short introductions and Q&A after screening of each film. Coordinator: Prof. Avraham Sela
    • 6:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Potiche - François Ozon - 2010
    • The thrillingly incongruous image of Catherine Deneuve, the long-reigning queen of French cinema, in curlers and a cherry-red track suit is just one of the many delights in François Ozon’s 1977-set comedy, a very loose adaptation of a boulevard-theater production. The film’s title translates as “trophy wife,” the position that Deneuve’s Suzanne Pujol has held for decades in her loveless marriage to philandering umbrella-factory owner Robert. When labor unrest causes the high-strung Robert to suffer a collapse, the intrepid Suzanne steps in, endearing herself to the workers and rekindling a romance with a Communist ex-lover and union liaison, Babin. Much as he did in his 1950s-set film 8 Women, Ozon creates a stunning period piece, perfectly re-creating the 1970s through costume, hairstyle, décor, and music, epitomized in Suzanne and Babin’s outing at a disco. But above all, Potiche is a showcase for the formidable talents of Deneuve, whose comic timing proves just as impeccable as her dramatic delivery. As Suzanne breaks free of her coddled life, she realizes, just like many other women who discovered feminism in the 1970s, that the personal really is political.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema

Thursday, October 13th

Friday, October 14th

Monday, October 17th

  • "Art and Science as Parallel and Divergent Ways of Knowing"
    • The presentation is entitled "Art and Science as Parallel and Divergent Ways of Knowing" Nowadays, artists and scientists tend to think of their ways of probing the world as distinctly different. But such was not always the case (in fact the divide is only a few centuries old; think of Leonardo, think of the wonder cabinets of the seventeenth century). Lunch provided for 45
    • 12:00 pm, Weitz 236
  • "Business Ethics - Black, White or Gray?"
    • Talk about ethics in the professional world.
    • 7:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • The Uncanny Valley: The Digital Animation of the Face:
    • The Carleton Art and Art History department, CAMS and Viz are pleased to announce the upcoming lecture of Lawrence Weschler, who will be speaking in ( Weitz Center 230/ Boliou 104) at 7:30 pm Monday, October 17
    • 7:30 pm, Boliou 161 (handicapped accessible)

Tuesday, October 18th

Thursday, October 20th

  • Reflections: What Matters to Me and Why
    • Reflections series of talks on life, work and meaning continues with talk "Thank God Dinosaurs aren't around any more!" by Matt Rand, Associate Professor of Biology. Lunch will be provided. Cosponsored with EthIC.
    • 12:00 pm, Library Athenaeum
  • History Fall Lefler Lecturer, Prof Giancarlo Casale, University of Minnesota, Ottoman historian
    • "What did it mean to be a European in the Sixteenth Century? A View from the Ottoman Empire"
    • 5:00 pm, Leighton 305
  • Un secret, Claude Miller 2007
    • Carleton College concludes its inaugural Tournées French Film Festival with a public screening of Claude Miller’s compelling drama, “Un Secret,” on Thursday, Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the Weitz Center for Creativity Cinema. The film will be shown in French with English subtitles and Carleton faculty members will provide a brief introduction prior to the screening. This event is free and open to the public.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Cinema

Tuesday, October 25th

  • Opening Faculty and Staff Reception and Champagne Toast
    • The Humanities Center at the Weitz Center welcomes Carleton Faculty and Staff for our Opening Faculty and Staff Reception and Champagne Toast.
    • 4:30 pm, Weitz Center, Room 223
  • Reading by Nuruddin Farah
    • Award winning novelist from Somalia, Nuruddin Farah, will read from his work.
    • 5:00 pm, The Weitz Center's Large Meeting Room, 236
  • Honor, Shame, Family & Gender--Cinematic Representations of Middle East Societies between Tradition & Modernity
    • Eight selected films (Turkish, Palestinian, Egyptian and Iranian--all with English subtitles) will be presented and accompanied by short introductions and Q&A after screening of each film. Coordinator: Prof. Avraham Sela
    • 6:30 pm, Boliou 104
  • Public film event, Patricio Guzmán's 'Nostalgia for the Light'
    • Patricio Guzmán's 'Nostalgia for the Light' 2010 film. Film screening. Introductions to the film and historical context by Andrew Fisher, History department and independent filmmaker Cecilia Cornejo. Filmmaker Guzman, known for political documentaries, sets this filmic meditation on time, space, history and memory in Chile’s Atacama Desert, where astronomers peer into distant galaxies and relatives of “disappeared” political prisoners seek remains of their loved ones.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity Cinema

Thursday, October 27th

  • Careers in Social Justice Panel: Year of Service
    • Alumni who work in social justice service areas will talk about their careers on Thursday, 10/27, noon to 1pm, in Leighton 305. Pizza will be served. Stay tuned for more details.
    • 12:00 pm, Leighton 305
  • Prof Adeeb Khalid, Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Making of Modern Central Asia, Jane & Raphael Bernstein Professorship Public Talk
    • Thurs, Oct 27, 2011, 5 pm, Jane and Raphael Bernstein Asian Studies and History Professorship Public Talk by Prof Adeeb Khalid, Nation, Empire, and Revolution in the Making of Modern Central Asia, Gould Library Athenaeum
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum
  • The Tempest- all performances sold out
    • Shakespeare’s final play: The Tempest. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater

Friday, October 28th

  • The Tempest- all performances sold out
    • Shakespeare’s final play: The Tempest. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
  • Play, Shakespeare's The Tempest
    • Directed by guest Director Ed Berkeley, '66, Director of Undergraduate Opera Studies for The Juilliard School, Director of Aspen Opera Theater Center, Aspen Music Festival and School, and Artistic Director of New York’s Willow Cabin Theater Company. A class with Stephen Mohring, Art Dept, will design the production, and music is being written by David Kornfeld, '11. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater

Saturday, October 29th

  • The Tempest- all performances sold out
    • Shakespeare’s final play: The Tempest. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater
  • Play, Shakespeare's The Tempest
    • Directed by guest Director Ed Berkeley, '66, Director of Undergraduate Opera Studies for The Juilliard School, Director of Aspen Opera Theater Center, Aspen Music Festival and School, and Artistic Director of New York’s Willow Cabin Theater Company. A class with Stephen Mohring, Art Dept, will design the production, and music is being written by David Kornfeld, '11. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater

Sunday, October 30th

  • The Tempest - ALL performances sold out
    • Final performance of The Tempest, Shakespeare’s final play. Magic and monsters and storms, oh my! Will Prospero get revenge? Will Miranda find true love? Will Caliban take over the enchanted isle? Shakespeare’s The Tempest will answer all. Opens Thursday, October 27, runs Friday, October 28, Saturday, October 29, 2011 all at 7:30 pm, and on Sunday, October 30 at 2:00 pm. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and the number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Center Theater
  • Play, Shakespeare's The Tempest
    • Final performance: Sunday, October 30, 2011, 2:00 pm Directed by guest Director Ed Berkeley, '66, Director of Undergraduate Opera Studies for The Juilliard School, Director of Aspen Opera Theater Center, Aspen Music Festival and School, and Artistic Director of New York’s Willow Cabin Theater Company. A class with Stephen Mohring, Art Dept, will design the production, and music is being written by David Kornfeld, '11. To reserve seats for The Tempest, please call 507-222-4471. Leave your name, date and time, name of the play, and number of seats that you would like to reserve. Productions are general admission and free of charge.
    • 2:00 pm, Weitz Center Theater

November 2011

Tuesday, November 1st

Wednesday, November 2nd

  • Understanding the Arab Spring - A Public Talk by Professor Avraham Sela
    • Understanding the Arab Spring - A Public Talk by Professor Avraham Sela, Benedict Distinguished Visiting Scholar and the A. Ephraim and Shirley Diamond Chair in International Relations at Hebrew University. The Humanities Center and the Department of Political Science are pleased to present a talk by Professor Sela, one of the world’s experts on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and a well-known scholar of the Arab and Islamic worlds.
    • 7:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

Thursday, November 3rd

  • 'Seeing is Knowing: the Universe' exhibition tour
    • Tour the large gallery at the Teaching Museum with Joel Weisberg, physics and astronomy; Dan Bruggeman, studio art; Victoria Morse, history
    • 12:00 pm, Teaching Museum, Weitz Center for Creativity
  • Humanities Center Panel: Perspectives on the Arab Spring
    • Speakers: Yaron Klein (Middle Eastern Languages), Dana Strand (French and Francophone Studies) and Devashree Gupta (Political Science): This panel presentation on the Arab Spring will examine the role of music, social media, film and literature in shaping the protest movements that began in Tunisia in the spring of 2011 and continue throughout the Middle East. Please see more...
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center for Creativity Large Meeting Room 236

Saturday, November 5th

  • Somali Famine Panel: Special Envoy Mr. Abukar Arman, Prof Ahmed Samatar, Macalester & Mr. Mohamed Hassan, ARC-Somalia
    • Asiya Mohamoud Gaildon, '14, and the Somali Famine Relief Group at Carleton have organized a panel discussion featuring Mr. Abukar Arman, Representative of the Somali Transitional Federal Government, Professor Ahmed I. Samatar, Somali professor of International Relations at Macalester College, and Mr. Mohamed Hassan from ARC-Somalia, to raise awareness of the devastating famine currently crippling Somalia and Somalia’s delicate sociopolitical state. This panel is sponsored by The Humanities Center, the African and African American Studies program and the Chaplain's Office. Everyone is invited to attend. The panel is scheduled for Saturday, November 5 from 12:00-2:00 p.m. in Boliou 104. Please contact Asiya Mohamoud Gaildon for further information at: gaildona@carleton.edu
    • 12:00 pm, Boliou 104

Tuesday, November 8th

January 2012

Tuesday, January 10th

Wednesday, January 11th

Thursday, January 12th

  • Public talk, History of Leprosy, Kathleen Vongsathorn, '07, Oxford
    • "What Suffering Will Be Saved": Replacing Stigma with Charity in the History of Leprosy from the Middle Ages to the Present, Gould Library Athenaeum, free and open to the public, light refreshments event, sponsored by MARS and the History Department Herbert P. Lefler Speaker endowment.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

Friday, January 13th

  • A Complex Weave: Women and Identity in Contemporary Art begins (through Mar. 11)
    • A Complex Weave reveals the ongoing vitality of the Feminist artist movement with works by contemporary women artists of varied backgrounds exploring aspects of identity through painting, drawing, needlework, photography and other media.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher Gallery
  • Running the Numbers: Portraits of Mass Consumption begins (through Mar. 11)
    • Artist Chris Jordan composes huge color photographs based on statistical facts about American consumer culture.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery

Thursday, January 19th

  • Laura Brown: A Lecture on Non-Human Literary Genres
    • Laura Brown, the Fred W. and Margaret C. Schuster Distinguished Visiting Lecturer in Literature, will speak on "Non-Human Genres: Love, Paradise, and the Rise of the Animal in English Literature."
    • 4:00 pm, Athenaeum, Gould Library

Tuesday, January 24th

  • LTC Lunch: Dialogos II: Aliens Among Them—Experiences of (Not) Belonging in Europe Today
    • Is migration in Europe fundamentally different today than in the past? How do members of particular migrant communities experience marginalization in Europe, and how does this marginalization affect both the host country and the communities themselves? This presentation will explore commonalities among very different migrant groups (Chinese, Indian, former Soviet) in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.
    • 11:45 am, Weitz Center for Creativity. Larson Meeting Room, 236

Wednesday, January 25th

Thursday, January 26th

February 2012

Thursday, February 2nd

Friday, February 3rd

Thursday, February 9th

Wednesday, February 15th

  • "In Between"
    • Ibrahim Miari is an actor, writer, director, choreographer and Sufi dance with the Acco Theatre Center in Israel. "In Between" is a semi autobiographical one man show about his experience growing up in Israel in a mixed Jewish and Muslim family. The play touches upon issues such as identity, culture, religion, traditions, and the tensions between Jews and Arabs.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Cinema

Friday, February 17th

Tuesday, February 21st

Thursday, February 23rd

Sunday, February 26th

  • Living Electric Theater: Cinema Emerges in Northfield
    • Carol Donelan, Associate Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at Carleton College, will offer a narrated tour through re-created episodes in Northfield’s early moviegoing history in the cinema at the Weitz Center for Creativity on Sunday, February 26 at 2:00pm. In addition to the lecture, early short films and a stellar cast of local musicians and performers will enliven the show. Come experience the movies as they once were. The event is co-sponsored by Carleton’s Humanities Center and Cinema & Media Studies Department, the Northfield Historical Society, the Northfield News and KYMN Radio. Free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.
    • 2:00 pm, WCC 161 - Weitz Cinema

Monday, February 27th

  • "Foucault on Biopower and Governmentality," by Professor Mihaela Czobor-Lupp
    • Professor Czobor-Lupp is a member of the Carleton Political Science Department, where she teaches modern and contemporary political theory, democratic theory, critical theory, post-modernism, and politics and literature. This special public event is sponsored by the Humanities Center at Carleton.
    • 5:00 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

March 2012

Thursday, March 1st

Sunday, March 11th

  • A Complex Weave: Women and Identity in Contemporary Art ends
    • A Complex Weave reveals the ongoing vitality of the Feminist artist movement with works by contemporary women artists of varied backgrounds exploring aspects of identity through painting, drawing, needlework, photography and other media.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Braucher Gallery
  • Running the Numbers: Portraits of Mass Consumption ends
    • Artist Chris Jordan composes huge color photographs based on statistical facts about American consumer culture.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery

Thursday, March 29th

Friday, March 30th

  • Photographing the Social Body: Malian Portraiture from the Studio to the Street begins (through May 18)
    • Mali in West Africa is home to many talented photographers and to a rich photographic culture. This exhibition explores photographic portraiture, considering both renowned studio photographers and work by generations of photographers who have come of age artistically since the Bamako Biennial, a recurring pan-African photography exhibition established in 1994.
    • Perlman Teaching Museum, Kaemmer Family Gallery

Saturday, March 31st

  • Perlman Teaching Museum Community Open House
    • Enjoy two exhibitions and a 3:30pm gallery talk by Kristin Makholm from the MN Museum of American Art, along with family art activities!
    • 2:00 pm, Perlman Teaching Museum, Weitz Center for Creativity

April 2012

Monday, April 2nd

Tuesday, April 3rd

  • A Walking Guide to Virtual Shakespeare
    • Presentation by Katherine Rowe, Chair and Professor of English at Bryn Mawr College
    • 11:55 am, Interactive Classroom (Weitz 235), Weitz Center for Creativity

Wednesday, April 4th

Thursday, April 5th

Saturday, April 7th

  • Hula: Free Master dance class
    • A dance class taught by Dietrix Jon Duhaylonsod, Kumu Hula offered - all are welcome! No age or dance experience required!
    • 10:00 am, Weitz Center, Large Dance Studio #165
  • Hula: Performance of Halau Kiawekupono O Ka Ua
    • Hula?? In Northfield?? Yes, and aloha! Come see this "halau" of 8 Hawaiian men dance traditional hula on the Weitz Center stage.
    • 7:30 pm, Weitz Center Theater

Friday, April 13th

Saturday, April 14th

Thursday, April 19th

  • Celebrating the Shahnameh
    • Panel discussion: Professor Adeeb Khalid, Professor Yaron Klein, and Dr. William N. Buffet '55
    • 5:15 pm, Gould Library Athenaeum

Friday, April 20th

Saturday, April 21st

  • Foro Latinoamericano
    • Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City
    • 9:30 am, Gould Library Athenaeum

Monday, April 23rd

Tuesday, April 24th

Wednesday, April 25th

Thursday, April 26th

May 2012

Tuesday, May 1st

Wednesday, May 2nd

Thursday, May 3rd