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Faculty Experts

The Carleton Office of Media and Public Relations offers a faculty experts program that assists the media in connecting with Carleton faculty and staff that can serve as expert spokespeople in their respective fields.

The full listing of Carleton's faculty and staff media experts is available for download via pdf. Media wishing to contact the following experts may do so by calling the Office of Media and Public Relations at (507) 222-4183 or emailing Eric Sieger, Director of Media & Public Relations, at esieger@carleton.edu.

Below are some examples of those faculty and staff that are willing to speak with the media about their area of expertise, which range from conservation to social networks to Islam.

Nancy Braker
Director of the Cowling Arboretum

Braker, formerly the director of conservation of Baraboo Hills and western uplands for The Nature Conservancy in Wisconsin, can serve as an expert in conservation of natural areas, conservation of rare species, restoration and management of natural areas, use of fire to manage natural areas (prescribed fire) and invasive species management. She is charged with increasing the role of Carleton’s Arboretum in conservation, education, and in the sustainability of its lands. A 1981 Carleton graduate, she earned a master’s of science degree in entomology from the University of Minnesota in 1986 and worked for The Nature Conservancy from 1985 until coming back to Carleton in the fall of 2007.

David Liben-Nowell
Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Liben-Nowell is conducting research on social networks, broadly divided into two categories: extracting interesting information from large- scale real-world social networks and developing mathematical models of social networks (and proving that they reproduce features observed in the real world). Liben-Nowell has previously worked on problems in computational biology, complexity of games and peer-to-peer systems. He earned his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2005, writing his dissertation on An Algorithmic Approach to Social Networks. He conducted his undergraduate work at Cornell University.