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Visuality Conference Features Commissioned Play-in-Progress by Michael Elyanow

September 25, 2012

As part of Carleton College’s innovative conference “Visual Learning: Transforming the Liberal Arts,” the public is invited to attend a performance of “Play in Progress: The Making of ‘Split Seconds,’” a commissioned play by Michael Elyanow. On Saturday, Sept. 29 at 8 p.m. in Carleton’s Weitz Center for Creativity Theater, join director Ruth Weiner, playwright Michael Elyanow, and members of the cast for a discussion of the play they are creating together this fall at Carleton, entitled “Split Seconds.” This event is free and open to the public.

Carleton's Department of Theater commissioned Elyanow to create a play that would foreground political themes and their effect on the lives of students. The play will incorporate visual imagery of the 2008 presidential election along with those created by prize-winning photojournalist Sebastian Meyer, whose photographs of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan lend a global dimension to the play. This hour-long event will incorporate readings by the cast of “Split Seconds,” thoughts from the creative team, and visual images.

“Visual Learning: Transforming the Liberal Arts” is the capstone event of the Visualizing the Liberal Arts (Viz) Initiative at Carleton, funded by a grant awarded to the College by the Mellon Foundation.  Thanks to this unique initiative, in only three years Carleton College now stands poised, along with other like-minded colleges and universities across the nation, to seriously explore new ways of teaching and learning in the 21st century. The significance of this innovative approach to teaching and learning will provide the framework for a series of transformative conversations and exciting presentations reflecting the growing use of visual tools in higher education.

For more information, including disability accommodations, contact Aisling Quigley at (507) 222-5487 or by email at aquigley@carleton.edu. The Weitz Center for Creativity is located at 320 North Third Street in Northfield. Enter the Perlman Teaching Museum, Weitz Center for Creativity, at Third and College Streets.