Kudos

  • Roger Lasley, registrar, co-presented sessions titled "Dreams and Nightmares in the Course Proposal/Schedule Creation Process," Keeping ‘em Happy: It Takes More than Money" and led the Small College Issues Roundtable at the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers annual meeting.

  • Adeeb Khalid, associate professor of history, has been awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship to Assist Research and Artistic Creation in support of his project titled "The Making of Soviet Central Asia, 1917-1929." Awarded annually to advanced professionals in a range of fields, the fellowships are among the most competitive and prestigious in North America.

  • Adeeb Khalid, associate professor of history, has been chosen as one of sixteen 2005 Carnegie Scholars, all of whom will study themes focusing on Islam and the modern world. His project is titled "Understanding Soviet Islam: The Roots of Contemporary Central Asia." Khalid, a leading expert on Central Asia, is engaged in a sustained historical study of the transformation of Islam and Islamic knowledge within Central Asia during the Soviet era. His work focuses on both the Soviet destruction of Islamic institutions in the region between 1927 and 1938 and the modern-day consequences resulting from it. Situating Central Asia at the intersection of Islamic and Soviet history, he proposes to bring disparate literatures in history, anthropology and religious studies to bear on materials from various sources, including the Russian State Archives for Sociopolitical History and the State Archives of the Russian Federation in Moscow. The strategic importance of post-Soviet Central Asia can scarcely be exaggerated. Lying astride the boundaries of the Middle East, China and Russia, the region plays a critical role in the "war on terror." Khalid's research will expand knowledge of contemporary Islam in Central Asia, a region largely unknown to experts in Islamic studies. Results of the project will be disseminated through a book and academic articles.

  • Becky Boling, professor of Spanish, presented a paper based on a play by the Argentine dramatist Susana Torres Molina, titled "Performing Gender in ...y a otra cosa mariposa," at the Latin American Theatre Today (LATT) Conference/Festival titled "Translation, Transgender and Transnationalism."

  • Scott M. Koehler, M.D., head team physician, returned from the World Championships for Snowboarding in Tandandalen, Sweden, where he was the team physician for the US Ski and Snowboarding teams, a position he has held since 1999. Koehler is in his fifth year as the head team physician for Carleton varsity sports and also is a physician at Allina Medical Clinic in Northfield.

  • Robert Bonner, the Marjorie Crabb Garbisch Professor of History and the Liberal Arts, Emeritus, and his wife, Barbara, were awarded the Northfield Sertoma Club's 2005 Service to Mankind award--the highest award given by Sertoma International. The Bonners served as leaders in the Friends of the Northfield Public Library in the early 1980s. Barbara was also involved the Garden Club, as a Brownie Troop leader and continues to tutor one child each year at a local elementary school. Bob served on the Northfield Planning Commission in the 1970s and has been a member of the Laura Baker Services Association Board since 1989, presently serving as president.

  • Joel Weisberg, the Herman and Gertrude Mosier Stark Professor of Physics and Astronomy and the Natural Sciences, presented a lecture titled "The Lives and Deaths of Stars" to the Sutherland Astronomical Society in Sydney, Australia.

  • Kathleen Galotti, professor of psychology and cognitive studies and director of cognitive studies, has authored a chapter titled "Setting goals and making plans: How children and adolescents frame their decisions" in a forthcoming volume titled "The development of judgment and decision making in children and adolescents," edited by Janis Jacobs and Paul Klaczynski and published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

  • George Soule, professor emeritus of English, published an article titled "`The Prelude' and the French Revolution" in the January 2005 issue of The Charles Lamb Bulletin.

  • Emily Meyer '04 has been named to the American Sociological Association's (ASA) Honors Program, involving exceptional upperclass undergraduate sociology students in a series of special events in conjunction with the annual ASA meetings. This is a relatively new program and the first time that a Carleton student will participate. Meyer is a sociology/anthropology major at Carleton.

  • The Semaphore Repertory Dance Company spent four days in Ames, Iowa at Iowa State University, this year's hosts of the regional American College Dance Festival.

  • Sam Demas, college librarian and senior lecturer, is one of six experts—an architect, four librarians and a humanities professor—who wrote essays for the new Council on Libary and Information Resources report titled "The Library as Place: Rethinking Roles, Rethinking Space." Demas' essay is titled "From the Ashes of Alexandria: What’s Happening in the College Library?".