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ASTR 110.00 Introduction to Astronomy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 47, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 51211

Ryan C Terrien

An introduction to current astronomy with an emphasis on how we know what we know. Topics include the solar system; the life cycles of stars; pulsars, quasars, and black holes; and the history and future fate of the universe. No mathematics background beyond high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed.

Extra Time Required

ASTR 113.00 Observational and Laboratory Astronomy 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Goodsell 104

MTWTHF
7:00pm10:00pm
Synonym: 51212

Cindy Blaha

Theory and practice of basic techniques in observational and laboratory astronomy. Certain problems involve the use of the 16-inch and 8-inch telescopes.

Prerequisite: Astronomy 100, 110, 127, 232, 233, Physics 228, 232, 233 or instructor permission

S/Cr/NC only

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development: A Problem Solving Approach and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 51006

Jennifer M Wolff, Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Sarah Deel

This offering of Biology 125 offers a problem solving approach and covers the same concepts as the winter version of Biology 125. The course format allows time in class to apply new concepts by working through case study type problems with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences, and this offering of Biology 125 is designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background. In addition, the active learning component of the course is beneficial for students who like to learn by doing. Students who complete this course are well-prepared to continue on to Biology 126.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 51009)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development: A Problem Solving Approach and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51007

Jennifer M Wolff, Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Annie Bosacker

This offering of Biology 125 offers a problem solving approach and covers the same concepts as the winter version of Biology 125. The course format allows time in class to apply new concepts by working through case study type problems with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences, and this offering of Biology 125 is designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background. In addition, the active learning component of the course is beneficial for students who like to learn by doing. Students who complete this course are well-prepared to continue on to Biology 126.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 51010)

BIOL 125.59 Genes, Evolution, and Development: A Problem Solving Approach and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51008

Jennifer M Wolff, Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Annie Bosacker

This offering of Biology 125 offers a problem solving approach and covers the same concepts as the winter version of Biology 125. The course format allows time in class to apply new concepts by working through case study type problems with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences, and this offering of Biology 125 is designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background. In addition, the active learning component of the course is beneficial for students who like to learn by doing. Students who complete this course are well-prepared to continue on to Biology 126.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL9 (Synonym 51011)

BIOL 238.00 Entomology 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51012

David Hougen-Eitzman

Insects are one of the most successful groups of organisms on the planet, playing major roles in all terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. In addition, since insects are ubiquitous they affect human endeavors on many fronts, both positively (e.g., crop pollination) and negatively (damage to crops and transmitting disease). This class will focus on the biology of insects, including physiology, behavior, and ecology. Many examples will highlight current environmental issues.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and concurrent registration in Biology 239

BIOL 239 required

BIOL 244.00 Biostatistics 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 50887

Mark McKone

An introduction to statistical techniques commonly used in Biology. The course will use examples from primary literature to examine the different ways that biological data are organized and analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on how to choose the appropriate statistical techniques in different circumstances and how to use statistical software to carry out tests. Topics covered include variable types (categorical, parametric, and non-parametric), analysis of variance, generalized linear models, and meta-analysis. There will be an opportunity for students to analyze data from their own research experiences.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one Biology 200 or 300 level course

BIOL 280.00 Cell Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51014

Raka M Mitra

An examination of the structures and processes that underlie the life of cells, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic. Topics to be covered include methodologies used to study cells; organelles, membranes and other cellular components; protein targeting within the cell; and cellular communication and division.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and concurrent registration in Biology 281

BIOL 281 required.

BIOL 321.00 Ecosystem Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51017

Daniel L Hernández

Ecosystem ecology involves the study of energy and material flow through systems, including both the biotic (animals, plants, microbes) and abiotic (soil, water, atmosphere) components. Topics include the major elemental cycles (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous), patterns of energy flow, and the controls of these fluxes for different ecosystems. Current environmental issues are emphasized as case studies, including climate change, land use change, human alterations of nutrient cycles, and biodiversity effects on ecosystems. Concurrent registration in Biology 322 required.

Prerequisite: Biology 126 and one 200 level course in Biology or Geology 230, 258, 285 or Environmental Studies 244, 254, 260, 265, 288

BIOL 322 required.

BIOL 338.00 Genomics and Bioinformatics 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51019

Rika E Anderson

The advent of next-generation sequencing technology has revolutionized biology, enabling transformative breakthroughs in fields ranging from agriculture to conservation to medicine. In this course, students will gain experience with the computational and bioinformatics tools needed to analyze “big data,” including sequence searching and alignment, assembly, gene calling and annotation. Students will learn to ask and answer their own scientific questions using sequence data, and to critically assess the conclusions other genomics and bioinformatics studies. No prior computer programming experience is required. Associated laboratory will focus on wet lab methods for DNA/RNA extraction and preparation as well as computational analysis.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one of these upper level courses: Biology 240, Biology 321 or Biology 350 and concurrent registration in Biology 339

Biology 339 required

BIOL 350.00 Evolution 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51021

Mark McKone

Principles and history of evolutionary change in wild populations, with consideration of both microevolutionary and macroevolutionary time scales. Topics covered include causes of change in gene frequency, the nature of adaptation, constraints on evolutionary change, the evolution of genes and proteins, rates of speciation and extinction, and the major events in evolutionary history.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 365.00 Seminar: Topics in Neuroscience 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51022

Fernán Jaramillo

We will focus on recent advances in neuroscience. All areas of neuroscience (cellular/molecular, developmental, systems, cognitive, and disease) will be considered. Classical or foundational papers will be used to provide background.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 379.00 Seminar: Behavioral Genetics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51032

Matt Rand, Stephan G Zweifel

Recent advances in molecular biology have allowed researchers to test specific hypotheses concerning the genetic control of behavior. This course will examine information derived from various animal model systems, including humans, using a variety of techniques such as classical genetics, genome databases, transgenics, and behavioral neurobiology.

Prerequisite: Biology 240

Waitlist Only.

BIOL 395.00 Research Experience Seminar in Biology 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51026

Sarah Deel

This seminar course is intended for students who have completed a summer research project or internship in the biological sciences. The intent of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to discuss their research experience, learn from the experiences of other members of the class, read relevant primary literature, and prepare a poster for a student research symposium.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

1st 5 weeks

CHEM 122.00 An Introduction to Chemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51097

Daniela L Kohen

An introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry to prepare students to enter subsequent chemistry courses (Chemistry 123 or 128). Atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, and gases will be covered in the course. Although learning through discovery-based processes, small groups, and short laboratory experimentation will occur, this is not a lab course and doesn't fulfill the requirements for medical school. This course assumes competence with simple algebra, but no prior chemistry experience.

Prerequisite: Students with high school chemistry should probably take Chemistry 123 or 128. (Determined by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation, Chemistry Home Page).

CHEM 123.53 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 106

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 51099

Chris Calderone

An introduction to chemistry for students who have taken high school chemistry or Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Adequate secondary school preparation as indicated by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation (Chemistry Home Page) or Chemistry 122.

CHEM 123.54 Principles of Chemistry I With Problem Solving & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103 / Olin 141 / Hulings 106

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm10:10am11:10am11:10am12:20pm10:10am11:10am12:00pm1:00pm
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 52585

Matt Whited

An introduction to chemistry for students who have taken high school chemistry or Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128. This section of Chemistry with problem solving is periodically offered for students who wish to further develop their general analytical and critical thinking skills. This smaller section will have additional class meetings for problem solving and review. Chemistry 123 with problem solving is appropriate for students who would like to have more scheduled time to work with a faculty member on developing their scientific reasoning skills and understanding of the foundations of chemistry.

Prerequisite: Adequate secondary school preparation as indicated by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation (Chemistry Home Page) or Chemistry 122

CHEM 123.59 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 106

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51100

Chris Calderone

An introduction to chemistry for students who have taken high school chemistry or Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Adequate secondary school preparation as indicated by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation (Chemistry Home Page) or Chemistry 122.

CHEM 224.52 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Hulings 106

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51101

Steven M Drew

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.57 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Hulings 106

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51102

Steven M Drew

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 233.52 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 118

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51105

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.54 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305 / Hulings 118

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51103

Joe Chihade, Kim Huynh

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.57 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 118

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51106

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.59 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305 / Hulings 118

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51104

Joe Chihade, Kim Huynh

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 301.01 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103 / Olin 02

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:00am12:00pm
Synonym: 51107

Deborah S Gross, Joe Chihade

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory and one lecture session per week. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230) and 233 and Mathematics 120 (121)

CHEM 301.02 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103 / Olin 02

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 51108

Deborah S Gross, Joe Chihade

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory and one lecture session per week. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230) and 233 and Mathematics 120 (121)

CHEM 301.03 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103 / Olin 02

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:00am12:00pm
Synonym: 51109

Joe Chihade, Deborah S Gross

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory and one lecture session per week. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230) and 233 and Mathematics 120 (121)

CHEM 301.04 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103 / Olin 02

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 51110

Joe Chihade, Deborah S Gross

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory and one lecture session per week. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230) and 233 and Mathematics 120 (121)

CHEM 343.00 Chemical Thermodynamics 6 credits

Open: Size: 40, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51111

Daniela L Kohen

The major topic is chemical thermodynamics, including the First and Second Laws, the conditions for spontaneous change, thermochemistry, and chemical equilibrium. To showcase how chemists utilize energy concepts to solve problems, thermodynamics will be regularly applied to a number of real-world examples and scientific problems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128, Mathematics 120 or 211 and six credits from Physics courses number 131 to 165.

CHEM 353.00 Organic Chemistry III 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51112

Kim Huynh

The correlation of structure and reactivity in organic molecular systems is studied through the analysis of reaction mechanisms. Topics will include linear free energy relationships, isotope effects, and molecular orbital theory. We will use these theories to analyze reactions, such as pericyclic, enantioselective, and organometallic transformations.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234; Either previous or concurrent registration in Chemistry 301, 343 or 344

CHEM 301 or 343 or 344 required

CHEM 395.00 Research Experience Seminar in Chemistry 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52469

Sarah Deel

This seminar course is intended for students who have completed a summer research project or internship in the chemical sciences. The intent of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to discuss their research experience, learn from the experiences of other members of the class, read relevant primary literature, and prepare a poster for a student research symposium.

1st five weeks

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 36, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51284

Jeffrey R Ondich

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111. Students may not simultaneously enroll for CS 108 and CS 111 in the same term.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL1 (Synonym 51287)

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51285

Amy Csizmar Dalal

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111. Students may not simultaneously enroll for CS 108 and CS 111 in the same term.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 51288)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm3:30pm4:30pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51286

Titus H Klinge

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111. Students may not simultaneously enroll for CS 108 and CS 111 in the same term.

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 51289

Titus H Klinge

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51290

Eric C Alexander

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL2 (Synonym 51291)

CS 314.00 Data Visualization 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51296

Eric C Alexander

Understanding the wealth of data that surrounds us can be challenging. Luckily, we have evolved incredible tools for finding patterns in large amounts of information: our eyes! Data visualization is concerned with taking information and turning it into pictures to better communicate patterns or discover new insights. It combines aspects of computer graphics, human-computer interaction, design, and perceptual psychology. In this course, we will learn the different ways in which data can be expressed visually and which methods work best for which tasks. Using this knowledge, we will critique existing visualizations as well as design and build new ones.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201

CS 328.00 Computational Models of Cognition 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51322

Anna N Rafferty

How are machine learning and human learning similar? What sorts of things can people learn, and how can we apply computer science ideas to characterize cognition? This interdisciplinary course will take a computational modeling approach, exploring how models can help us to better understand cognition and observing similarities between machine learning methods and cognitive tasks. Through in class activities and readings of both classic and contemporary research papers on computational cognitive modeling, we'll build up an understanding of how different modeling choices lead to different predictions about human behavior and investigate potential practical uses of cognitive models. Final collaborative research projects will allow you to apply your modeling skills to a cognitive phenomenon that you're interested in.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission. Computer Science 202 strongly recommended

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 51981

Ethan L Struby

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51982

Faress Bhuiyan

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.00 Principles of Microeconomics With Problem Solving 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm10:45am11:50am11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51993

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods. The four-day meeting schedule allows students to engage in collaborative problem solving in the classroom setting.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51985

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51986

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 265.00 Game Theory and Economic Applications 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51990

Jonathan M Lafky

Game theory is the study of purposeful behavior in strategic situations. It serves as a framework for analysis that can be applied to everyday decisions, such as working with a study group and cleaning your room, as well as to a variety of economic issues, including contract negotiations and firms' output decisions. In this class, modern game theoretic tools will be primarily applied to economic situations, but we will also draw on examples from other realms.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 270.00 Economics of the Public Sector 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 51991

Jenny Bourne

This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on policy analysis using the criteria of efficiency and equity. Topics include rationales for government intervention; analysis of alternative public expenditure programs from a partial and/or general equilibrium framework; the incidence of various types of taxes; models of collective choice; cost-benefit analysis; intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 281.00 International Finance 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51987

Prathi Seneviratne

This course studies theories of the multi-faceted interaction between the balance of international payments and foreign exchange market and the general levels of domestic prices, employment and economic activity. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms in international payments, macroeconomic policies for internal and external balance, and international monetary systems.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 51992

Ben Keefer

The main objective of this course is to investigate various aspects of modern portfolio theory and develop basic techniques for applying this theoretical framework to real-world data. Topics covered include portfolio and asset pricing theories, and derivatives with the primary focus on option pricing. The class will develop and actively use univariate calculus for theory-building and statistical techniques for data analysis.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51988

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both statistical theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and either Mathematics 215 or 275, and Economics 110 and 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 51989

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

ECON 395.02 Advanced Topics in Macroeconomic Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 50990

Ethan L Struby

This course includes detailed analyses of aggregate consumption, investment, money-holding and labor market behavior with special attention to each area's micro-foundations and to the empirical verification of theory. These analyses are related to the determination of national income, employment and the price level; to long-run economic growth and business cycle fluctuations; to fluctuations in financial markets; and to optimal public policy.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission

ECON 395.03 Advanced Topics in Applied Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52733

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on the advanced research tools needed to perform original empirical economic research as applied to various areas of microeconomics, including: market power and the performance of industries, labor markets, discrimination, the performance of government programs, environmental and natural resource policy, college and professional sports, and legal and political institutions governing resource allocation.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331

ENTS 120.51 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

CMC 110

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:20pm
1:45pm3:00pm1:45pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52259

Papia F Rozario

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

GEOL 125.52 Introduction to Field Geology & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL35 / Music & Drama Center LL54

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 52568

Cameron Davidson

This course introduces fundamental principles of geology and geological reasoning using the geology of southern Minnesota as a guide. Weather permitting, much of the classroom and lab time will be spent outdoors at nearby sites of geological interest. Using field observations, descriptions, data-gathering and interpretation, supplemented by lab work and critical reading, students will piece together the most important elements of the long and complex geologic history of southern Minnesota. Field trips, including one or two all-day weekend trips, and laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Held for new first year students

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 125.WL2 (Synonym 52569)

GEOL 125.54 Introduction to Field Geology & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL35 / Music & Drama Center LL54

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 52571

Cameron Davidson

This course introduces fundamental principles of geology and geological reasoning using the geology of southern Minnesota as a guide. Weather permitting, much of the classroom and lab time will be spent outdoors at nearby sites of geological interest. Using field observations, descriptions, data-gathering and interpretation, supplemented by lab work and critical reading, students will piece together the most important elements of the long and complex geologic history of southern Minnesota. Field trips, including one or two all-day weekend trips, and laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 52572)

GEOL 210.53 Geomorphology & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL35

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 51733

Mary E Savina

Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota. Laboratories and field trips included.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or instructor permission

GEOL 210.54 Geomorphology & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL35 / Music & Drama Center LL06

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 51734

Mary E Savina

Study of the geological processes and factors which influence the origin and development of the surficial features of the earth, with an emphasis on some or all of the processes in Minnesota. Laboratories and field trips included.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or instructor permission

HIST 100.01 The Black Death: Disease and Its Consequences in the Middle Ages 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51862

Victoria Morse

In the 1340s, the Black Death swept through the Middle East and Europe, killing up to a third of the population in some areas. How can we understand what this catastrophe meant for the people who lived and died at the time? In this seminar, we will examine the Black Death (primarily in Europe) from a range of perspectives and disciplines and through a range of sources. We will seek to understand the biological and environmental causes of the disease, therapies, and the experience of illness, but also the effects of the mortality on economic, social, religious, and cultural life.

Held for new first year students

HIST 120.00 Rethinking the American Experience: American History, 1607-1865 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51945

Serena R Zabin

A survey of the American experience from before Christopher Columbus' arrival through the Civil War. Some of the topics we will cover include: contact between Native and European cultures; the development of the thirteen mainland British colonies; British, French, and Spanish imperial conflicts over the Americas; slavery; the American Revolution; religious awakenings; antebellum politics; and the Civil War.

HIST 139.00 Foundations of Modern Europe 6 credits

Susannah R Ottaway

A narrative and survey of the early modern period (fifteenth through eighteenth centuries). The course examines the Renaissance, Reformation, Contact with the Americas, the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment. We compare the development of states and societies across Western Europe, with particularly close examination of the history of Spain.

IDSC 100.00 Measured Thinking: Reasoning with Numbers about World Events, Health, Science and Social Issues 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 51860

Neil S Lutsky

This interdisciplinary course addresses one of the signal features of contemporary academic, professional, public, and personal life: a reliance on information and arguments involving numbers. We will examine how numbers are used and misused in verbal, statistical, and graphical form in discussions of world events, health, science, and social issues.

Held for new first year students

IDSC 100.02 Science in the News 6 credits

Closed: Size: 14, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Olin 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 52453

Cindy Blaha

This course will explore how scientists communicate with other scientists as well as the general public. Focused on the types of communication expected in the sciences, assignments will include reading, writing, and speaking activities tailored to a variety of audiences. We will explore current scientific topics in the news and investigate whether results are well supported by evidence and seem quantifiably reasonable. Students will use data, graphics, and text for a variety of purposes and will incorporate their assignments into several class-produced journals.

Prerequisite: Requires concurrent registration in IDSC 198

Requires concurrent registration in IDSC 198 Held for first year students

IDSC 110.00 Thinking with Numbers: Using Math and Data in Context 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Olin 103

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52464

Melissa Eblen-Zayas

This course will enhance students' quantitative skills and provide opportunities to apply those skills to authentic problems. Topics covered will vary depending on students in the class; possible topics include unit conversions, significant figures and estimation, exponents, logarithms, algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics. We will explore how these skills are relevant in contexts ranging from making personal finance decisions to understanding medical research reports.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 099, Undergraduate Bridge Experience

Instruction Permission

MATH 215.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51359

Adam Loy

Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have received credit for Mathematics 115 may petition the department to seek approval to register for Mathematics 215. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 265-275 Probability-Statistics sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Math 115, Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Math 275.

MATH 215.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51360

Laura M Chihara

Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have received credit for Mathematics 115 may petition the department to seek approval to register for Mathematics 215. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 265-275 Probability-Statistics sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Math 115, Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Math 275.

MATH 245.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51363

Andy Poppick

A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215 (or equivalent) or 275

MATH 280.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

CMC 201

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51366

Andy Poppick

Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 245 and instructor permission

Waitlist Only. Instructor Permission required.

MATH 315.00 Topics Probability/Statistics: Bayesian Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 23, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 50922

Adam Loy

An introduction to statistical inference and modeling in the Bayesian paradigm. Topics include Bayes' Theorem, common prior and posterior distributions, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods (e.g., the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and Gibbs sampler) and model adequacy and posterior predictive checks. The course uses R extensively for simulations.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 275

NEUR 127.00 Foundations in Neuroscience & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51722

Sarah H Meerts, Brielle M Bjorke

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

NEUR 127.52 Foundations in Neuroscience & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 52738

Brielle M Bjorke, Sarah H Meerts

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

NEUR 127.53 Foundations in Neuroscience & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am1:00pm5:00pm10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 52739

Brielle M Bjorke, Sarah H Meerts

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

PHYS 131.54 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics & Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Olin 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm1:00pm5:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51159

Jeff Walter

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 142, 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 131.57 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics & Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Olin 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm8:00am12:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51160

Jeff Walter

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 142, 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 151.54 Introduction to Physics: Relativity and Particles & Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Olin 204 / Olin 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm1:00pm5:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51161

Jeff Walter, Jay D Tasson

An introduction to principles of physics in the domain of the very small and very fast. Topics include the special theory of relativity, and selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or 121 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131, 132, 141 or 142 (completion or concurrent registration). Not open to students who have completed Physics 143 or 144 at Carleton.

2nd 5 weeks

PHYS 152.57 Introduction to Physics: Environmental Physics & Lab 3 credits

Closed: Size: 24, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 101 / Olin 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm8:00am12:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51162

Jeff Walter

An introduction to principles of physics and their application to the environment. Topics include energy and its flows, engines, energy efficiency, energy usage and conservation in vehicles and buildings, the atmosphere, and climate change. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work or field trips.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration), 132, 141, 142, 143, 144 or 145

2nd 5 Week.

PHYS 210.00 Sustainable Energy Principles and Design 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 103

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51168

Arjendu K Pattanayak

Introduction to the basic physics, thermodynamics, and engineering of energy sources and sinks. Overview of relevant sustainable energy practices and design principles, as well consideration of broader impacts and policy implications. The course will consider the world energy landscape with particular local and global foci. Includes a significant group academic civic engagement project that focuses on renewable energy design. Design projects vary, but include aspects of energy auditing, regulatory evaluation, performance analysis, and system design and operation of solar PV, wind turbines, or other renewable energy technologies. Extra meetings required. This course is part of an off-campus winter break program involving two linked courses in fall and winter terms.

Prerequisite: 6 credits of Physics, not Physics 100. Physics 211 required winter term

OCS Winter Break Physics Program

PHYS 228.52 Atomic and Nuclear Physics & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Olin 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51164

Marty Baylor

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 228.54 Atomic and Nuclear Physics & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Olin 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52718

Marty Baylor, Barry N Costanzi

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 228.59 Atomic and Nuclear Physics & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Olin 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51163

Marty Baylor

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 343.57 Electronics & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Olin 204 / Olin 210

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51165

Barry N Costanzi

A study of the electrical circuits and electronics underlying modern physics instrumentation. Includes an introduction to microprocessor and microcomputer design. Approximately equal emphasis on analog and digital electronics. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 235

PHYS 355.00 Topics in Advanced Classical Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Olin 101

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51169

Jay D Tasson

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods including central force motion, coupled harmonic oscillators, and the study of continuous systems. Additional subjects may include fluid dynamics, classical field theory or other specialized topics.

Prerequisite: Physics 231 (229 and 230)

POSC 100.01 Society in Silico 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51861

Greg Marfleet

Can models help us understand the social world? Vexing issues like segregation, economic inequality, corruption, market failure, resource over-exploitation, genocide, insurgency and terrorism have inspired scholars to ask if computational models of social systems can shed light on the hard-to-observe micro processes underlying macro problems. In this course we will explore the conceptual and empirical foundations of modeling especially in complex systems. We will read about, then experiment with, existing models while students learn to program their own using open-source software. 

Held for new first year students

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51889

Alex Von Hagen-Jamar

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 204.00 Media and Electoral Politics: 2018 United States Election 6 credits

Barbara Allen

Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news using our multi-year data set of content analyzed election ads and news. We study a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods to learn how political communication affects U.S. elections. Taking this course in conjunction with Political Science 223 is highly recommended to learn methods such as focus group and depth interview methods and experiment design for conducting original research on elections.

Extra Time Required

POSC 218.00 Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods?

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Not open to first year students.

POSC 223.00 Lab in Electoral Politics 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 50916

Barbara Allen

This lab is designed as a supplement research in POSC 203, 204, 215, or 227. Students currently enrolled in POSC 204 and students who have taken the above courses are encouraged to enroll. We learn to conduct focus groups, depth interviews, content analysis, and experimental analysis using election news, ads, speeches, and debates (in the U.S. or other democracies) as our cases for analysis.

2nd five week

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 51892

Kent Freeze

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm
Synonym: 51896

Greg Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

PSYC 221.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
1:00pm4:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51234

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 221.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Sensation and Perception 2 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Olin 11

MTWTHF
1:00pm4:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51235

Julia F Strand

This course accompanies Psychology 220. Students will replicate classical phenomena and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human perceptual processes. Psychology 221 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 220. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 220 and 221 to satisfy the LS requirement.

PSYC 220 required

PSYC 260.00 Health Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51237

Gisel Flores-Montoya

This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 261.01 Health Psychology Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Olin 116

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51238

Gisel Flores-Montoya

This course provides students with direct experience applying principles of health psychology. Students will engage in a term-long self-directed project aimed at increasing the frequency of a healthy behavior (such as exercising) or decreasing the frequency of an unhealthy behavior (such as smoking). Additionally, we will read and discuss case studies that relate to the current topic in the lecture portion of the course. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 260 is required. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 260

PSYC 260 required.

PSYC 261.02 Health Psychology Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Olin 116

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51239

Gisel Flores-Montoya

This course provides students with direct experience applying principles of health psychology. Students will engage in a term-long self-directed project aimed at increasing the frequency of a healthy behavior (such as exercising) or decreasing the frequency of an unhealthy behavior (such as smoking). Additionally, we will read and discuss case studies that relate to the current topic in the lecture portion of the course. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 260 is required. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 and concurrent registration in Psychology 260

PSYC 260 required.

PSYC 366.00 Cognitive Neuroscience 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 51242

Julie J Neiworth

It should be obvious that every process that goes on in the mind has physiological underpinnings. But, whether we can unlock the secrets of learning, memory, perception, language, decision-making, emotional responding, empathy, morality, social thinking, deception, and manipulation as they are supported by neurons and neural connections is a longstanding and elusive problem in psychology. Contemporary primary source articles are mostly used for this discussion-driven course, but a brief textbook/manual on brain processing is also required. The student should leave the class with a working understanding of brain processes and of contemporary theories of brain processes that may support many mental processes in humans.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Biology 125 or Psychology 216 or Neuroscience 127 or permission of the instructor.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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