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Your search for courses for 18/FA and with Curricular Exploration: SI found 49 courses. New Search

CGSC 130.00 What Minds Are What They Do: An Introduction to Cognitive Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51221

Jason A Decker

An interdisciplinary examination of issues concerning the mind and mental phenomena. The course will draw on work from diverse fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, philosophy, linguistics, anthropology, and neuroscience. Topics to be discussed include: the mind-body problem, embodied cognition, perception, representation, reasoning, and learning.

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 51981

Ethan L Struby

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51982

Faress Bhuiyan

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.00 Principles of Microeconomics With Problem Solving 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm10:45am11:50am11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51993

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods. The four-day meeting schedule allows students to engage in collaborative problem solving in the classroom setting.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51985

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51986

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 265.00 Game Theory and Economic Applications 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51990

Jonathan M Lafky

Game theory is the study of purposeful behavior in strategic situations. It serves as a framework for analysis that can be applied to everyday decisions, such as working with a study group and cleaning your room, as well as to a variety of economic issues, including contract negotiations and firms' output decisions. In this class, modern game theoretic tools will be primarily applied to economic situations, but we will also draw on examples from other realms.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 270.00 Economics of the Public Sector 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 51991

Jenny Bourne

This course provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the government's role in the U.S. economy. Emphasis is placed on policy analysis using the criteria of efficiency and equity. Topics include rationales for government intervention; analysis of alternative public expenditure programs from a partial and/or general equilibrium framework; the incidence of various types of taxes; models of collective choice; cost-benefit analysis; intergovernmental fiscal relations.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 281.00 International Finance 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51987

Prathi Seneviratne

This course studies theories of the multi-faceted interaction between the balance of international payments and foreign exchange market and the general levels of domestic prices, employment and economic activity. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms in international payments, macroeconomic policies for internal and external balance, and international monetary systems.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ECON 282.00 The Theory of Investment Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 51992

Ben Keefer

The main objective of this course is to investigate various aspects of modern portfolio theory and develop basic techniques for applying this theoretical framework to real-world data. Topics covered include portfolio and asset pricing theories, and derivatives with the primary focus on option pricing. The class will develop and actively use univariate calculus for theory-building and statistical techniques for data analysis.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51988

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both statistical theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and either Mathematics 215 or 275, and Economics 110 and 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 51989

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

ECON 395.02 Advanced Topics in Macroeconomic Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 50990

Ethan L Struby

This course includes detailed analyses of aggregate consumption, investment, money-holding and labor market behavior with special attention to each area's micro-foundations and to the empirical verification of theory. These analyses are related to the determination of national income, employment and the price level; to long-run economic growth and business cycle fluctuations; to fluctuations in financial markets; and to optimal public policy.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission

ECON 395.03 Advanced Topics in Applied Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52733

Mark T Kanazawa

This course focuses on the advanced research tools needed to perform original empirical economic research as applied to various areas of microeconomics, including: market power and the performance of industries, labor markets, discrimination, the performance of government programs, environmental and natural resource policy, college and professional sports, and legal and political institutions governing resource allocation.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331

EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 51684

Jeff Snyder

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 51685)

EDUC 225.00 Issues in Urban Education 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51693

Anita P Chikkatur

This course is an introduction to urban education in the United States. Course readings and discussion will focus on various perspectives in the field in order to understand the key issues and debates confronting urban schools. We will examine historical, political, economic, and socio-cultural frameworks for understanding urban schools, students and teachers. Through course readings, field visits and class discussions, we explore the following: (1) student, teacher and researcher perspectives on urban education, (2) the broader sociopolitical urban context of K-12 schooling in cities, (3) teaching and learning in urban settings and (4) ideas about re-imagining urban education.

Extra Time Required

EDUC 234.00 Educational Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51686

Deborah Appleman

Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students.

Extra Time Required

ENTS 120.51 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

CMC 110

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:20pm
1:45pm3:00pm1:45pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52259

Papia F Rozario

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

ENTS 395.00 Senior Seminar 3 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 52255

George Vrtis

This seminar will focus on preparing Environmental Studies majors to undertake the senior comprehensive exercise. The seminar will be organized around a topic to-be-determined and will involve intensive discussion and the preparation of a detailed research proposal for the comps experience. The course is required for all Environmental Studies majors choosing the group comps option.

Prerequisite: Completion of all other Environmental and Technology Studies core courses except comps

PE 348.00 Contemporary Issues in Athletics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Recreation Center 225

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 50830

Luciano H Battaglini

An examination of athletics and their relationship to society. This course focuses on the emergence of contemporary sport and the current issues facing participants, coaches, administrators, and spectators. A special emphasis is placed on understanding the motivating factors behind sport and developing a philosophy of sport that will help students evaluate current sporting issues in society.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51871

Dev Gupta

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 51872)

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51889

Alex Von Hagen-Jamar

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 204.00 Media and Electoral Politics: 2018 United States Election 6 credits

Barbara Allen

Our analysis of media influences on politics will draw from three fields of study: political psychology, political behavior and participation, and public opinion. Students will conduct a study of the effects of campaign ads and news using our multi-year data set of content analyzed election ads and news. We study a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods to learn how political communication affects U.S. elections. Taking this course in conjunction with Political Science 223 is highly recommended to learn methods such as focus group and depth interview methods and experiment design for conducting original research on elections.

Extra Time Required

POSC 210.00 Misinformation, Political Rumors, and Conspiracy Theories 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51890

Christina E Farhart

Why do people believe in conspiracy theories, hold on to misinformed beliefs even in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary, and/or spread political and social rumors that may have little basis in fact? Who is most vulnerable to these various forms of misinformation? What are the normative and political consequences of misperceptions (if any)? This course explores the psychological, political, and philosophical approaches to the study of the causes, consequences, and tenacity of conspiracy beliefs, misinformation, and political rumors, as well as possible approaches that journalists could employ to combat misperceptions.

POSC 218.00 Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods?

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Not open to first year students.

POSC 223.00 Lab in Electoral Politics 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 50916

Barbara Allen

This lab is designed as a supplement research in POSC 203, 204, 215, or 227. Students currently enrolled in POSC 204 and students who have taken the above courses are encouraged to enroll. We learn to conduct focus groups, depth interviews, content analysis, and experimental analysis using election news, ads, speeches, and debates (in the U.S. or other democracies) as our cases for analysis.

2nd five week

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 51892

Kent Freeze

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 239.00 Globalization and Economic Development in the African Diaspora 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 50881

Charisse E Burden-Stelly

This course examines the foundations of development and globalization, their representations as historical processes, their manifestations over time, and their advocates and detractors. This will be done against the backdrop of empirical and substantive representations of actually-existing development outcomes and globalization processes, their organization, and their practices. This course employs a critical approach to development and is taught from a political economy perspective. In particular, it deals with the relationship between theory, ideology and practice by contrasting classical approaches with critical, Marxist, and radical approaches. It examines outcomes of development practice, both positive and negative, through a focus on globalization.

POSC 264.00 Politics of Contemporary China 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51893

Kent Freeze

This course examines the political, social and economic transformation of China over the past thirty years. Students will explore the transformation of the countryside from a primarily agricultural society into the factory of the world. Particular emphasis will be placed on economic development and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. The class will explore these changes among farmers, the working class and the emerging middle class. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

POSC 273.00 Race and Politics in the U.S. 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

This course addresses race and ethnicity in U.S. politics. Following an introduction to historical, sociological, and psychological approaches to the study of race and ethnicity, we apply these approaches to understanding the ways in which racial attitudes have been structured along a number of political and policy dimensions, e.g., welfare, education, criminal justice. Students will gain an increased understanding of the multiple contexts that shape contemporary racial and ethnic politics and policies in the U.S., and will consider the role of institutional design, policy development, representation, and racial attitudes among the general U.S. public and political environment.

POSC 328.00 Foreign Policy Analysis* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm
Synonym: 51896

Greg Marfleet

Foreign policy analysis is a distinct sub-field within international relations that focuses on explaining the actions and choices of actors in world politics. After a review of the historical development of the sub-field, we will explore approaches to foreign policy that emphasize the empirical testing of hypotheses that explain how policies and choices are formulated and implemented. The psychological sources of foreign policy decisions (including leaders' beliefs and personalities and the effect of decision-making groups) are a central theme. Completion of a lower level IR course and the stats/methods sequence is recommended.

POSC 358.00 Comparative Social Movements* 6 credits

Dev Gupta

This course will examine the role that social movements play in political life. The first part of the course will critically review the major theories that have been developed to explain how social movements form, operate and seek to influence politics at both the domestic and international levels. In the second part of the course, these theoretical approaches will be used to explore a number of case studies involving social movements that span several different issue areas and political regions. Potential case studies include the transnational environmental movement, religious movements in Latin America and the recent growth of far right activism in northern Europe.

Extra Time Required

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51231

Julie J Neiworth

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 47, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51232

Mija M Van Der Wege, Sarah H Meerts, Sharon A Akimoto

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 250.00 Developmental Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 101

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51236

Kathleen M Galotti

An introduction to the concept of development, examining both theoretical models and empirical evidence. Prenatal through late childhood is covered with some discussion of adolescence when time permits. Topics include the development of personality and identity, social behavior and knowledge, and cognition. In addition, attention is paid to current applications of theory to such topics as: day care, the role of the media, and parenting.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission

PSYC 358.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology Seminar in Prague: Psychopathology 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 51241

Ken Abrams

In the West mental illness has traditionally been approached with a biomedical model that views it as independent of culture. By contrast the "relativist" position assumes that, to a large extent, human behaviors are culturally determined and that the etiology and manifestation of mental disorders are affected by society and culture. This course will address such issues as well as their implications for assessment and treatment through an examination of several Western and non-Western societies, with a special emphasis on Czech society. There will be several guest lectures by Czech psychology professors as well as excursions within Prague to psychiatric hospitals and clinics, where students will meet with Czech clinicians and patients.

Prerequisite: Acceptance in Cross-Cultural Studies in Praque program

OCS Cross Cultural Psychology in Prague

PSYC 366.00 Cognitive Neuroscience 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 51242

Julie J Neiworth

It should be obvious that every process that goes on in the mind has physiological underpinnings. But, whether we can unlock the secrets of learning, memory, perception, language, decision-making, emotional responding, empathy, morality, social thinking, deception, and manipulation as they are supported by neurons and neural connections is a longstanding and elusive problem in psychology. Contemporary primary source articles are mostly used for this discussion-driven course, but a brief textbook/manual on brain processing is also required. The student should leave the class with a working understanding of brain processes and of contemporary theories of brain processes that may support many mental processes in humans.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Biology 125 or Psychology 216 or Neuroscience 127 or permission of the instructor.

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52203

Meryl Lauer

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 52204)

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52192

Annette M Nierobisz

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 52193)

SOAN 180.00 Anthropology and Colonialism in Africa 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 52549

Ahmed S Ibrahim

How has Africa been shaped by colonialism and what has been the relationship of anthropology to colonialism? Between 1884 and 1960, Africa was restructured by colonial rule. This course will examine how colonialism transformed the laws, political structures, political economy, and religion of different colonial states. It will also examine the complicated relationship between the discipline of anthropology and colonialism. In doing so, we will draw from ethnographies and historical studies and analyze the role of anthropologists in Africa during the colonial era and its aftermath.

SOAN 203.00 Anthropology of Good Intentions 6 credits

Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

Is the environmental movement making progress? Do responsible products actually help local populations? Is international AID alleviating poverty and fostering development? Today there are thousands of programs with sustainable development goals yet their effectiveness is often contested at the local level. This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them. In doing so we hope to uncover common pitfalls behind good intentions and the need for sound social analysis that recognizes, examines, and evaluates the role of cultural complexity found in populations targeted by these programs.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 259.00 Comparative Issues in Native North America 6 credits

Jerome M Levi

This course examines the cultural and historical situation of indigenous groups in the United States, Mexico, and Canada to develop a comparative perspective for understanding native peoples in North America. How have indigenous peoples variously coped with continuity and change? What strategies have they employed in pursuit of political sovereignty, economic survival, and cultural vitality? In answering these questions, we will explore the politics of representation regarding "the Indian" as a symbol in national consciousness; the negotiation of identity in inter-ethnic contexts; patterns of resistance; the impact of European powers and state agendas; and the resurgence of tradition.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 325.00 Sociology of Adoption and Assisted Reproduction 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 52195

Liz Raleigh

Where do babies come from? Whereas once the answer was relatively straight forward, the growth of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and adoption has changed the field of potential answers. Nowadays babies can come from birthmothers, egg donors, and surrogates. In this course we will examine the meaning and making of families across these different types of formations and contextualize the popularity of ART relative to the decrease in adoption. We will take a sociological approach to analyzing these issues, paying particular attention to questions surrounding women's rights, baby "markets," and the racialization of children placed for adoption in the U.S.

Prerequisite: Prior Sociology/Anthropology course or instructor permission

SOAN 330.00 Sociological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 23, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52196

Wes D Markofski

Many thinkers have contributed to the development of sociology as an intellectual discipline and mode of social inquiry; however, few have had the influence of Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, and Max Weber. This course focuses on influential texts and ideas generated by these and other theorists from sociology’s “classical era,” how these texts and ideas are put to use by contemporary sociologists, and on more recent theoretical developments and critical perspectives that have influenced the field. 

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 396.01 Advanced Sociological and Anthropological Writing 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 19, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52197

Liz Raleigh

This course explores different genres of writing and different audiences for writing in the social sciences, focusing particular attention on scholarly articles published in professional journals in sociology and anthropology. To that end, students both analyze sociological and anthropological articles regarding commonalities and differences in academic writing in our two sister disciplines. Students work on their own academic writing process (with the help of peer-review and instructor feedback). The writing itself is broken down into component elements on which students practice and revise their work.

Prerequisite: Completion of Sociology/Anthropology 240 or submission of a topic statement in the preceding spring term and submission of a comps thesis proposal on the first day of fall term. Senior Sociology/Anthropology major or instructor permission

SPAN 229.07 Madrid Program: Current Issues in Spanish Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 51465

Humberto R Huergo

This course offers a fresh look of Spain's current political and economic life. Discussion topics include the rise of Podemos and the new Spanish political scene, the Catalan separatist movement, political corruption, illegal immigration, and the role of the European Union.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or higher and acceptance in Madrid OCS Program

Participation in Carleton OCS Madrid Program

WGST 180.00 Power and Desire: Gender Relations in the Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 140

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52552

Ahoo Najafian

This course investigates how gender identities and relationships between “men” and “women” have been articulated, constructed, and refashioned throughout the Middle East. Starting with problematizing fixed notions of gender and sexuality, we map prominent attitudes through visiting a diverse array of sources from the Qur’an, Sunna, and legal documents to historical and anthropological case studies, literature, and film from across the region. Exploring notions of femininity and masculinity, as well as attitudes towards homosexuality and transgendered populations, we witness their implications in case studies and stories, from a divorce court in Iran to a vampiric dystopia.

WGST 200.00 Gender, Power and the Pursuit of Knowledge 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 52088

Meera Sehgal

In this course we will examine whether there are feminist ways of knowing, the criteria by which knowledge is classified as feminist and the various methods used by feminists to produce this knowledge. Some questions that will occupy us are: How do we know what we know? Who does research? Does it matter who the researcher is? How does the social location (race, class, gender, sexuality) of the researcher affect research? Who is the research for? How can research relate to efforts for social change? While answering these questions, we will consider how different feminist researchers have dealt with them.

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