ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 19/SP and with Curricular Exploration: SI found 54 courses. New Search

AFST 120.00 Gender and Sexuality in the African Diaspora 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 53466

Marlon M Bailey

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of gender and sexualities throughout the Africa Diaspora. We will study the complexities of gender and sexual experiences, practices, identities, and community formations within various cultural contexts throughout the Black world.

AFST 200.00 The Black Intellectual Tradition in the Twentieth Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 53032

Charisse E Burden-Stelly

This course focuses on theories, ideologies, frameworks, and methodologies that constitute: 1) the Black intellectual tradition in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and 2) Africana Studies as an academic discipline. The course is structured around interrogations of Black strategies and struggles for justice, recognition, self-determination, and freedom. We will read and discuss classic and contemporary scholarship concerning the study of the Black experience in the United States and the African Diaspora, and that has shaped the discipline of Africana Studies. Thinkers covered include W.E.B. DuBois, Angela Y. Davis, Marcus Garvey, Frantz Fanon, Patricia Hill Collins, and Molefi Asante.

AFST 220.00 Intersectionality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52835

Marlon M Bailey

This course is an in-depth examination of intersectionality, as a theory and analytic framework, and the socio/political projects out of which it emerges. We will focus on how intersecting categories of social difference such as race, class, gender, and sexuality create and maintain social inequalities in U.S. society and abroad. Some of the other intersecting forms of social difference we will explore include, ethnicity, nation/migration, dis/ability, and HIV/disease status. 

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 52009

Bruce R Dalgaard

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 52010

Ben Keefer

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 52011

Ethan L Struby

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52012

Prathi Seneviratne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 52013

Prathi Seneviratne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 52024

Faress Bhuiyan

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 240.00 Microeconomics of Development 6 credits

Faress Bhuiyan

This course explores household behavior in developing countries. We will cover areas including fertility decisions, health and mortality, investment in education, the intra-household allocation of resources, household structure, and the marriage market. We will also look at the characteristics of land, labor, and credit markets, particularly technology adoption; land tenure and tenancy arrangements; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; and the impacts of alternative politics and strategies in developing countries. The course complements Economics 241.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 263.00 Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and Economic Performance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52014

Bruce R Dalgaard

Joseph Schumpeter, in lamenting the absence of an accepted theory of entrepreneurship, observed that this gap in economics is much like having Hamlet performed with the Prince of Denmark absent. Much has changed since Schumpeter leveled this criticism. Economics has embraced the contributions of entrepreneurs and provided theoretical models explaining their actions. This course explores the foundations of a microeconomic theory of entrepreneurship, investigating the role of entrepreneurs (and intrapreneurs within large organizations) as agents for change. Case studies of business development provide practical illustrations of ways in which entrepreneurs operate and how their efforts contribute to economic progress.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 or 111

ECON 268.00 Economics of Cost Benefit Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52025

Aaron M Swoboda

Cost-benefit analysis is a tool commonly used by economists and policy makers to compare and choose among competing policy options. This course will cover the basic theory and empirical techniques necessary to quantify and aggregate the impacts of government policy, especially as related to the environment. Topics covered include the time value of money; uncertainty; sensitivity analysis; option value; contingent valuation; hedonic estimation; basic research design. Throughout the course case studies will be used to elucidate and bring life to the theoretical concepts.

Prerequisite: ECON 111. Some statistics background will be useful.

ECON 275.00 Law and Economics 6 credits

Jenny Bourne

Legal rules and institutions influence people's behavior. By setting acceptable levels of pollution, structuring guidelines for contract negotiations, deciding who should pay for the costs of an accident, and determining punishment for crimes, courts and legislatures create incentives. How do economic considerations factor into legal rules, and how do laws affect economic output and distribution? In this class, we use court cases, experiments, and current legal controversies to explore such issues.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 283.00 Corporate Organization and Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 52027

Ben Keefer

This course investigates decision-making by firms and their managers. Specific topics include tradeoffs in corporate organization, executive compensation, project valuation, the cost of capital under debt and equity financing, and the firm’s optimal capital structure. 

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52015

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both statistical theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and either Mathematics 215 or 275, and Economics 110 and 111

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 52017

Yaniv Ben-Ami

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and Mathematics 215 (or Mathematics 275 or permission of the instructor) and Economics 110 and 111

EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51689

Jeff Snyder

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 51690)

EDUC 250.00 Fixing Schools: Politics and Policy in American Education 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 51696

Jeff Snyder

How can we fix American public schools? What is "broken" about our schools? How should they be repaired? And who should lead the fix? This course will examine the two leading contemporary educational reform movements: accountability and school choice. With an emphasis on the nature of the teaching profession and the work of foundations, this course will analyze the policy agendas of different reform groups, exploring the dynamic interactions among the many different stakeholders responsible for shaping American education.

EDUC 338.00 Multicultural Education 6 credits

Anita P Chikkatur

This course focuses on the respect for human diversity, especially as these relate to various racial, cultural and economic groups, and to women. It includes lectures and discussions intended to aid students in relating to a wide variety of persons, cultures, and life styles.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level Educational Studies course or instructor permission

Extra Time Required

EDUC 344.00 Teenage Wasteland: Adolescence and the American High School 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51697

Deborah Appleman

Is adolescence real or invented? How does the American high school affect the nature of American adolescence? How does adolescence affect the characteristics of middle and high schools? In addition to treating the concept historically, this interdisciplinary course focuses on psychological, sociological, and literary views of adolescence in and out of the classroom. We will also analyze how adolescence is represented in popular culture, including television, film, and music.

Prerequisite: 100 or 200-level Educational Studies course

Extra Time Required

ENTS 110.00 Environment and Society 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 52257

Kimberly K Smith

This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to a number of the pressing environmental changes currently facing human societies around the world. We will seek to understand and integrate the social, economic, scientific and political dimensions of these challenges. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the complexity of environmental issues and the interdisciplinary nature of the search for appropriate solutions. Topics will include global warming, population pressures, energy use, industrial waste and pollution, biological diversity, and sustainable agriculture.

Sophomore Priority. Extra time

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 110.WL0 (Synonym 52414)

EUST 159.00 "The Age of Isms" - Ideals, Ideas and Ideologies in Modern Europe 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 51522

Paul Petzschmann

"Ideology" is perhaps one of the most-used (and overused) terms of modern political life. This course will introduce students to important political ideologies and traditions of modern Europe and their role in the development of political systems and institutional practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We will read central texts by conservatives, liberals, socialists, anarchists and nationalists while also considering ideological outliers such as Fascism and Green Political Thought. In addition the course will introduce students to the different ways in which ideas can be studied systematically and the methodologies available.

LING 117.00 Sociophonetics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 52741

Morgan Rood

This course is a theoretical and practical introduction to studying phonetics (the science of speech) and its relation to sociolinguistic variation (how speech systematically varies across speakers). Throughout the course, students will collect their own conversational speech data and learn to conduct acoustic analysis. Skills developed in the course include recording speech, transcribing, data processing and normalization, and effective presentation of results.

LING 240.00 Semantics and Pragmatics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52530

Cherlon L Ussery

A central part of the grammar of a language is the meaning associated with words and phrases. This course explores the multi-faceted system that speakers access both when producing sentences and when interpreting them. Topics include the complexity surrounding actually defining words, the meanings of various modal verbs, and theories of pragmatics and the rules of conversation, among other topics. 

Prerequisite: Any 100 level Linguistics course

PHIL 214.00 Ecology, Ethics, and Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 52109

Allison E Murphy

In this course we will explore the hypothesis that the current ecological crisis is, at least in part, the product of an economic system that champions continual growth (hence ever increasing levels of production and consumption) and that the economic system is in turn supported by a specific set of materialist values. The course thus takes a holistic and interdisciplinary approach to its subject, and will include readings from across the disciplines of environmental science, economics, and ethics.

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 51919

Dev Gupta

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 51920)

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Greg Marfleet

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 212.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Kimberly K Smith

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

POSC 217.00 Monuments, Museums & Meaning: How Politics Shapes Memory in Artifacts 3 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 50882

Barbara Allen

Why was naming the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian “political?” Why is the Smithsonian’s Anacostia Museum not on the Washington DC Mall? What is memorialized by the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum? Why care about the eight Confederate leaders in the U.S. Capitol (or other public places)? This class examines museums and monuments as important types of political communication that preserve cultural artifacts, create historical records, and tell present and future generations the meaning of communities and individuals. We learn about various practices including funding, naming, acquiring, appropriating, placing, designing, and constructing the artifacts that house community memories.

1st 5 weeks

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

CMC 110

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 51935

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 232.00 Chinese Foreign Policy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 51936

Kent Freeze

The "Rise of China" over the past thirty-five years presents challenges and opportunities for the United States and other countries around the world. This course examines China's growing and changing influence in the world. The course starts by exploring historical Chinese foreign policy, from Imperial China through the Cold War. The course then examines a variety of different theories and factors explaining the general nature of China's foreign policy. The course concludes by detailing China's current bilateral relationships with specific countries and regions around the world.

POSC 267.00 Comparative Foreign Policy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 51938

Greg Marfleet

Why do states act the way they do internationally? Why do some states act like "rogues" while others support the system? How do countries choose their allies or enemies? How do governments define their country's national interest and respond to global changes? Foreign policy is where internal politics and external politics intersect. Understanding any country's foreign policy requires that we pay attention to its position in the international system and its internal politics. In this course we will employ approaches from international relations and comparative politics to explore these questions across a range of countries.

POSC 275.00 Black Radical Political Thought, 1919-1969 6 credits

Charisse E Burden-Stelly

This course examines the history of Black radical political thought in the United States between 1919 and 1969. It also explores internationalist and diasporic linkages that shaped, and were shaped by, the U.S. context. "Black Radicalism" refers to the forms of politics and thought that have challenged, nationally and globally, economic exploitation, social inequality, political marginalization, and private and state-sanctioned antiblackness. The political ideologies and practices we will consider include: Black nationalism, pan-Africanism, socialism and communism, and Black feminisms. The course will also pay special attention to the sociohistorical and political economic contexts that give rise to different forms of Black radicalism.

POSC 285.00 The U.S. Intelligence Community 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 52732

Jon R Olson

This course covers the U.S. Intelligence Community, how intelligence supports national security policy development, and how intelligence is applied to execute strategy in pursuit of policy objectives (specifically, implementation of national security and foreign policy initiatives). Studying the structure, processes, procedures, oversight, and capabilities of the Intelligence Community will enhance understanding of how intelligence supported or failed policymakers in national security decision-making, including the areas of deterrence, conventional war, counterinsurgency, and counterterrorism. The course concludes with the study of asymmetric warfare in our modern age and how intelligence might be used to better understand the changing dynamics of future global conflict.

POSC 286.00 Leaders and Advisors: Who Makes Foreign Policy and Why Does It Matter 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 50911

Alex Von Hagen-Jamar

Does it matter who is in charge? How do leaders and their advisors affect foreign policy? This course examines how foreign policy decisions are made. We will read and discuss literature on the preferences and expertise of policy-makers, the role of psychology and emotion in the decision-making process, and whether and how different institutional contexts matter. Along the way, we will discuss related topics, such as the selection and retention of advisors, the ability of leaders to exert oversight, and what makes communication and negotiation successful in international politics.

POSC 302.00 Subordinated Politics and Intergroup Relations* 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

How do social and political groups interact? How do we understand these interactions in relation to power? This course will introduce the basic approaches and debates in the study of prejudice, racial attitudes, and intergroup relations. We will focus on three main questions. First, how do we understand and study prejudice and racism as they relate to U.S. politics? Second, how do group identities, stereotyping, and other factors help us understand the legitimation of discrimination, group hierarchy, and social domination? Third, what are the political and social challenges associated with reducing prejudice?

POSC 334.00 Global Public Health* 6 credits

Alfred P Montero

This seminar covers a variety of public health issues in advanced capitalist and developing countries, including communicable diseases, neglected tropical diseases and scourges such as malaria, dengue, and AIDS, the effectiveness of foreign aid, and the challenges of reforming health care systems. Emphasis will be on how these issues interact with patterns of economic and social development and the capacity of states and international regimes. Students will develop a perspective on public policy using materials from diverse fields such as political science, epidemiology, history, economics, and sociology.

PSYC 110.01 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 35, Registered: 36, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51269

Julia F Strand

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 110.02 Principles of Psychology 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51270

Gisel Flores-Montoya

This course surveys major topics in psychology. We consider the approaches different psychologists take to describe and explain behavior. We will consider a broad range of topics, including how animals learn and remember contexts and behaviors, how personality develops and influences functioning, how the nervous system is structured and how it supports mental events, how knowledge of the nervous system may inform an understanding of conditions such as schizophrenia, how people acquire, remember and process information, how psychopathology is diagnosed, explained, and treated, how infants and children develop, and how people behave in groups and think about their social environment.

PSYC 263.00 Sleep and Dreaming 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 40, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51280

Lawrence Wichlinski

This course will examine recent experimental findings and current perspectives on sleep, dreaming, sleep disorders, and states of consciousness.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 354.00 Counseling Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Olin 103

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 51281

Steven F Kozberg

An introduction to theories, research, techniques, and issues in the field of counseling psychology. This course will be run as a seminar.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission. Psychology 252 is recommended

PSYC 382.00 Topics in Social and Personality: Endings 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 51283

Neil S Lutsky

This seminar will examine the psychology of endings, including endings associated with psychotherapy, social interactions, personal relationships, social roles, literature and the arts, and life itself. We will address when and how endings occur, how we experience endings, and what makes an ending a good or poor one, among other issues.

Prerequisite: Psychology 252, 256, 258, or instructor permission

RELG 357.00 Televangelists and Cyber-Shaykhs: Explorations in Religion and Media 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 140

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 52134

Noah Salomon

Beyond the mystic ideal of approaching the divine without intermediary, all believers have encountered religious truth only by the use of certain material objects, certain media that act as tools to help the believer develop piety or communicate theological truth. This course is interested in these "in-betweens," these media, objects and material that religious people use to approach the divine, as well as the impact of new medias (electronic or otherwise) on the development of modern religiosity. Students will be asked to roll-up their sleeves and delve into primary source material gathered from internet, television, popular literature and material culture.

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 52224

Ahmed S Ibrahim

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 52225)

SOAN 111.00 Introduction to Sociology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 52226

Liz Raleigh

Sociology is an intellectual discipline, spanning the gap between the sciences and humanities while often (though not always) involving itself in public policy debates, social reform, and political activism. Sociologists study a startling variety of topics using qualitative and quantitative methods. Still, amidst all this diversity, sociology is centered on a set of core historical theorists (Marx/Weber/Durkheim) and research topics (race/class/gender inequality). We will explore these theoretical and empirical foundations by reading and discussing influential texts and select topics in the study of social inequality while relating them to our own experiences and understanding of the social world. 

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 111.WL0 (Synonym 52227)

SOAN 222.00 Anthropology of Humor 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 50928

Jerome M Levi

Laughter is found in all human societies, but we do not all laugh at the same things. In this course we will discuss why, cross-culturally, some things are funny and others are not, and what forms humor may take (jokes, riddles, teasing, banter, clowning). We will look at such topics as joking relationships, evolutionary aspects of laughter and smiling, sexual inequality in humor, ethnic humor, and humor in religion and language. Some prior exposure to anthropology is desirable but not required. The main prerequisite for the course is a serious sense of humor. Not open to students who have taken Sociology/Anthropology 122.

Prerequisite: Previous coursework in Sociology/Anthropology

Not open to students who took SOAN 122

SOAN 226.00 Anthropology of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52235

Meryl Lauer

This course examines gender and gender relations from an anthropological perspective. We discuss such key concepts as gender, voice/mutedness, status, public and private spheres, and the gendered division of labor, and explore the intellectual history of these terms and how they have been used. The course focuses on two areas: 1) the role of sex, sexuality, and procreation in creating cultural notions of gender, and 2) the impacts of colonialism, globalization, and economic underdevelopment on Third World women. Readings include both theoretical articles and ethnographic case studies from around the world.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above.

SOAN 240.00 Methods of Social Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 52228

Annette M Nierobisz

The course is concerned with social scientific inquiry and explanation, particularly with reference to sociology and anthropology. Topics covered include research design, data collection, and analysis of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are considered. Student will demonstrate their knowledge by developing a research proposal that is implementable.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111; Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Mathematics 115 or 215

SOAN 270.00 Performance Ethnography 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 52481

Meryl Lauer

What are the choreographies of everyday life? How do we perform cultural notions of race, class, or gender? What do formal performance practices such as athletics, dance, or even courtroom procedures tell us about our larger social worlds? At the intersection of performance studies and anthropology, this class takes on the aesthetic, political, economic, and social dimensions of performance. We will explore both the spectacular and mundane performances that bring to the fore the forms of discipline and control that shape people’s lives around the world. Topics range from professional body-building in California to classical ballet in South Africa.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above.

SOAN 278.00 Urban Ethnography and the American Experience 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 52229

Wes D Markofski

American sociology has a rich tradition of focusing the ethnographic eye on the American experience. We will take advantage of this tradition to encounter urban America through the ethnographic lens, expanding our social vision and investigating the nature of race, place, meaning, interaction, and inequality in the U.S. While doing so, we will also explore the unique benefits, challenges, and underlying assumptions of ethnographic research as a distinctive mode of acquiring and communicating social knowledge. As such, this course offers both an immersion in the American experience and an inquiry into the craft of ethnographic writing and research.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 288.00 Diversity, Democracy, Inequality in America 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 50980

Wes D Markofski

Does social difference always lead to conflict and inequality? Can we forge common ground with justice across deep differences? What forms of respect, recognition, reciprocity, and redistribution do democratic citizens owe one another? We will explore these and related questions through a roughly equal mix of democratic theory and empirical studies of race/class/gender/religion diverse grassroots democratic movements in the U.S. We will consider the demands and challenges of "different types of difference" (racial-ethnic, gender-sexuality, class-culture, citizenship, language, and religion) for fighting inequity and pursuing ethical democracy in the United States (and beyond). 

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

Not open to students who took SOAN 350

SOAN 323.00 Mother Earth: Women, Development and the Environment 6 credits

Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

Why are so many sustainable development projects anchored around women's cooperatives? Why is poverty depicted as having a woman's face? Is the solution to the environmental crisis in the hands of women the nurturers? From overly romantic notions of stewardship to the feminization of poverty, this course aims to evaluate women's relationships with local environments and development initiatives. The course uses anthropological frameworks to evaluate case studies from around the world.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 353.00 Ethnography of Latin America 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 50994

Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

This course explores the origins and development of contemporary lived experiences in Latin America as interpreted through ethnographic works in anthropology. We will examine and analyze the structural processes that have shaped contact among indigenous, European, and non-European immigrants (e.g. African and Asian peoples) in Latin America since the Conquest and through colonial periods to understand today's Latin American societies. We will pay special attention to the impacts of global capitalist expansion and state formation, sites of resilience and resistance, as well as the movement of Latin American peoples throughout the world today. Course themes will address gender, identity, social organization, indigeneity, immigration, social inequality and environment.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

Not open to students who have taken SOAN 250

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests