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Your search for courses for 20/WI and with code: ENGLFORLIT found 7 courses. New Search

CLAS 112.00 The Epic in Classical Antiquity: Texts, Contexts, and Intertexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55268

Chico Zimmerman

It would be difficult to overstate the importance of the early Greek epics for the classical world and the western literary tradition that emerged from that world. This course will study closely both the Iliad and the Odyssey, as well as Hesiod’s Theogony, and then consider a range of works that draw upon these epics for their creator’s own purposes, including Virgil’s own epic, the Aeneid. By exploring the reception and influence of ancient epic, we will develop an appreciation for intertextuality and the dynamics of reading in general as it applies to generations of readers, including our own.

FREN 239.00 Banned Books 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55663

Cathy Yandell

Recent events in France have highlighted the issues of free speech and religious intolerance, among other cultural questions. Some of the most fascinating and now canonized works in French and Francophone literature were once banned because they called into question the political, religious, or moral sensibilities of the day. Even now, books deemed to be subversive are routinely censored in certain Francophone cultures. Through readings of such writers as Rabelais, Voltaire, Sade, Camus, Franz Fanon, Assia Djebar, and Hergé (Tintin), as well as contemporary articles from Charlie Hebdo, we will explore the crucial role of forbidden works in their cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 340.00 Arts of Brevity: Short Fiction 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55221

Scott D Carpenter

The rise of newspapers and magazines in the nineteenth century promotes a variety of short genres that will remain popular to the present day: short stories, prose poetry, vignettes, theatrical scenes. In this short course (first five weeks of the term) we'll study short works by such authors as Diderot, Sand, Balzac, Mérimée, Flaubert, Allais, Tardieu, Le Clézio. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

1st 5 weeks

FREN 341.00 Madame Bovary and Her Avatars 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55222

Scott D Carpenter

Decried as scandalous, heralded as the first "modern" novel, Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (published in 1857) sparked debate, spawned both detractors and followers, and became a permanent fixture in French culture and even the French language. In this five-week course we will read the novel, study its cultural context and impact, and see how it has been variously re-interpreted in film and other media. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

2nd 5 weeks

GRK 204.00 Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55208

Clara S Hardy

The goal for Intermediate Greek Prose and Poetry is to gain experience in the three major modes of Greek expression most often encountered “in the wild”—prose, poetry, and inscriptions—while exploring the notion of happiness and the good life. By combining all three modes into this one course, we hope both to create a suitable closure to the language sequence and to provide a reasonable foundation for further exploration of Greek literature and culture.

Prerequisite: Greek 103 with a grade of at least C-

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia López

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 330.00 The Invention of the Modern Novel: Cervantes' Don Quijote 6 credits

Jorge Brioso

Among other things, Don Quijote is a "remake," an adaptation of several literary models popular at the time the picaresque novel, the chivalry novel, the sentimental novel, the Byzantine novel, the Italian novella, etc. This course will examine the ways in which Cervantes transformed these models to create what is considered by many the first "modern" novel in European history.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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