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Your search for courses for 20/WI and with code: EUSTCNTRY found 15 courses. New Search

ENGL 222.00 The Art of Jane Austen 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 212

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55101

Susan Jaret McKinstry

All of Jane Austen's fiction will be read; the works she did not complete or choose to publish during her lifetime will be studied in an attempt to understand the art of her mature comic masterpieces, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion.

ENGL 279.07 London Program: Urban Field Studies 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 52990

Constance Walker

A combination of background readings, guided site visits, and personal exploration will give students tools for understanding the history of multicultural London. Starting with the city's early history and moving to the present, students will gain an understanding of how the city has been defined and transformed over time and of the complex cultural narratives that shape its standing as a global metropolis.

OCS London Program

ENGL 281.07 London Program: Romantic London 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 52954

Constance Walker

The Romantic era (1785-1830) was a time of extraordinary political, intellectual, and social volatility and vitality. With London as our classroom, we will explore the life of the great city at the hub of Romanticism by means of its magnificent public and domestic architecture, fashion and décor, dances, fine arts, journalism and political satire, and literature, including the poetry of Byron, Shelley, and Keats, the essays of Hazlitt and Lamb, and the novels of Austen. Field trips will include visits to the Tate Britain, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Library, Sir John Soane's Museum, the Pump Room and Costume Museum at Bath, and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS London program

Participation in Carleton OCS London Program

ENGL 282.07 London Program: London Theater 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 52989

Constance Walker

Students will attend productions (at least two per week) of classic and contemporary plays in a range of London venues both on and off the West End, and will do related reading. We will also travel to Stratford-upon-Avon for a 3-day theater trip. Class discussions will focus on dramatic genres and themes, dramaturgy, acting styles, and design. Guest speakers may include actors, critics, and directors. Students will keep a theater journal and write several full reviews of plays.

OCS London Program

ENGL 319.00 The Rise of the Novel 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55103

Jessica L Leiman

A study of the origin and development of the English novel throughout the long eighteenth century. We will situate the early novel within its historical and cultural context, paying particular attention to its concern with courtship and marriage, writing and reading, the real and the fantastic. We will also consider eighteenth-century debates about the social function of novels and the dangers of reading fiction. Authors include Behn, Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Walpole, and Austen.

Prerequisite: One English foundations course and one other 6 credit English course

FREN 204.00 Intermediate French 6 credits

Open: Size: 19, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55217

Cherif Keïta

Through discussion of book-length literary and cultural texts (film, graphic novel, theater), and including in-depth grammar review, this course aims to help students acquire greater skill and confidence in both oral and written expression. Taught three days a week in French.

Prerequisite: French 103 or equivalent

FREN 239.00 Banned Books 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55663

Cathy Yandell

Recent events in France have highlighted the issues of free speech and religious intolerance, among other cultural questions. Some of the most fascinating and now canonized works in French and Francophone literature were once banned because they called into question the political, religious, or moral sensibilities of the day. Even now, books deemed to be subversive are routinely censored in certain Francophone cultures. Through readings of such writers as Rabelais, Voltaire, Sade, Camus, Franz Fanon, Assia Djebar, and Hergé (Tintin), as well as contemporary articles from Charlie Hebdo, we will explore the crucial role of forbidden works in their cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 340.00 Arts of Brevity: Short Fiction 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55221

Scott D Carpenter

The rise of newspapers and magazines in the nineteenth century promotes a variety of short genres that will remain popular to the present day: short stories, prose poetry, vignettes, theatrical scenes. In this short course (first five weeks of the term) we'll study short works by such authors as Diderot, Sand, Balzac, Mérimée, Flaubert, Allais, Tardieu, Le Clézio. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

1st 5 weeks

FREN 341.00 Madame Bovary and Her Avatars 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55222

Scott D Carpenter

Decried as scandalous, heralded as the first "modern" novel, Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (published in 1857) sparked debate, spawned both detractors and followers, and became a permanent fixture in French culture and even the French language. In this five-week course we will read the novel, study its cultural context and impact, and see how it has been variously re-interpreted in film and other media. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

2nd 5 weeks

GERM 152.00 Personhood 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 54625

Seth Elliott Meyer

What is it to be human? What is the difference between human and animal? How do technology and AI alter our understanding of humanity? How does the rhetoric of personhood affect our judgment of others? What is an immigrant, a migrant, a refugee, a foreigner, an alien? In this English-language survey of German thought and literature, we will ask these questions with foundational philosophers from the Enlightenment to the present, engage with contemporary theorists on post-colonialism and nationalism, and rethink the concept of personhood by analyzing crucial new contributions from literature, theater, film, and art. Taught in English.

GERM 267.00 Catastrophe! Natural Disaster in German Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 54623

Kiley Kost

Are natural disasters ever really natural? In this course, taught in German, we will read works of literature and poetry that portray disaster. Focusing on disaster as the site of interaction between humans and the environment, we will explore and discuss the impact of modern technology, contemporary environmental issues, and the concept of disaster in the shadow of war. Thinking in terms of environmental justice, we will also consider who is impacted by such disasters and in what ways. We will read various genres of literature including works by Hoffmann, Frisch, Wolf, Haushofer and Maron among many others.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

RUSS 205.00 Russian in Cultural Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 55279

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students continue to develop skills of narration, listening comprehension, and writing, while exploring issues of contemporary Russian life and consciousness. The issues are examined from the position of two cultures: American and Russian. The course draws on a variety of sources for reading and viewing, including the periodic press, film, and music.

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent

RUSS 237.00 Beyond Beef Stroganoff: Food in Russian Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55285

Laura Goering

How did the Russian peasant stove shape culinary culture? Why did Catherine the Great force her subjects to cultivate potatoes? How did the October Revolution change the way Soviet citizens ate? In this course we will study key aspects of Russian history and culture through the lens of culinary history. Topics will include: food and fasting in Russian Orthodoxy; food, class and power under the tsars; high Russian (or is it French?) culture of the nineteenth century; Soviet policies for feeding the worker; non-Russian cuisines in the Soviet Union; drinking culture and anti-alcohol campaigns; food and nationalism in the twenty-first century. Includes hands-on sessions on Russian food preparation. In English.

In translation

SPAN 328.00 The Contemporary Spanish Fictional Essay 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55321

Palmar M Álvarez-Blanco

In this course we will study the various meanings of what has been labeled, aesthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity. We will also study the relationship between "postmodernism," the late-capitalist era and what has been called the "culture of contentment" or "culture of well-being." In addition, we will attempt to understand the interactions that exist between consumer culture, market societies and dominant ideology. To develop this theme we will focus on Spain, but will also continually establish cross-cultural comparisons with other countries. This course addresses many different genres (e.g. fictional essays, documentaries, gag cartoons, graphic novels, comics). The course also features evening films and guest lectures.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or 207

Extra Time Required

SPAN 330.00 The Invention of the Modern Novel: Cervantes' Don Quijote 6 credits

Jorge Brioso

Among other things, Don Quijote is a "remake," an adaptation of several literary models popular at the time the picaresque novel, the chivalry novel, the sentimental novel, the Byzantine novel, the Italian novella, etc. This course will examine the ways in which Cervantes transformed these models to create what is considered by many the first "modern" novel in European history.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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