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ARBC 387.00 The One Thousand and One Nights 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 55190

Yaron Klein

This course is an exploration of the world of the Thousand and One Nights, the most renowned Arabic literary work of all time. The marvelous tales spun by Shahrazad have captured and excited the imagination of readers and listeners--both Arab and non-Arab--for centuries. In class, we will read in Arabic, selections from the Nights, and engage some of the scholarly debates surrounding this timeless work. We will discuss the question of its origin in folklore and popular culture and the mystery of its "authorship," as well as the winding tale of its reception, adaptation and translation. Readings and class discussions will be in both Arabic and English.

Prerequisite: Arabic 206 or equivalent

ARTH 102.00 Introduction to Art History II 6 credits

Open: Size: 60, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 54548

Jessica F Keating, Kathleen M Ryor

An introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills (tools of analysis and interpretation) as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include, for example, humanist and Reformation redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

ARTH 209.00 Chinese Painting 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 54549

Kathleen M Ryor

Since the tenth century in China, a tension emerges between art created as a means of self expression and works which were intended to display social status and political power and to convey conventional values. This course concentrates on the primary site of this tension, the art of painting. We will explore such issues as the influence of Confucian and Daoist philosophy on painting and calligraphy, the changing perception of nature and the natural in art, the politics of style, and the increasing dominance of poetry rather than narrative as a conceptual construct for painting.

Prerequisite: Any one term of art history

ARTH 235.00 Revival, Revelation, and Re-animation: The Art of Europe's "Renaissance" 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 54550

Jessica F Keating

This course examines European artistic production in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century. The aim of the course is to introduce diverse forms of artistic production, as well as to analyze the religious, social, and political role of art in the period. While attending to the specificities of workshop practices, production techniques, materials, content, and form of the objects under discussion, the course also interrogates the ways in which these objects are and, at times, are not representative of the "Renaissance."

Prerequisite: One Art History course or instructor permission

ARTH 263.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Prehistory to Postmodernism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 52987

Baird E Jarman

This course surveys the history of European architecture while emphasizing firsthand encounters with actual structures. Students visit outstanding examples of major transnational styles--including Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Moorish, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassical and Modernist buildings--along with regionally specific styles, such as Spanish Plateresque, English Tudor and Catalan Modernisme. Cultural and technological changes affecting architectural practices are emphasized along with architectural theory, ranging from Renaissance treatises to Modernist manifestos. Students also visit buildings that resist easy classification and that raise topics such as spatial appropriation, stylistic hybridity, and political symbolism.

Participation in Carleton OCS Architectural Studies Program

ARTH 264.07 European Architectural Studies Program: Managing Monuments: Issues in Cultural Heritage Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 52988

Baird E Jarman

This course explores the theory and practice of cultural resource management by investigating how various architectural sites and urban historic districts operate. Students will consider cultural, financial, ethical and pedagogical aspects of contemporary tourism practices within a historical framework that roots the travel industry alongside religious pilgrimage customs and the aristocratic tradition of the Grand Tour. Interacting with professionals who help oversee architectural landmarks and archaeological sites, students will analyze and assess initiatives at various locations, ranging from educational programs and preservation plans to sustainability efforts and repatriation debates.

Participation in Carleton OCS Architectural Studies Program

CAMS 214.00 Film History III 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55135

Jay S Beck

This course is designed to introduce students to recent film history, 1970-present, and the multiple permutations of cinema around the globe. The course charts the development of national cinemas since the 1970s while considering the effects of media consolidation and digital convergence. Moreover, the course examines how global cinemas have reacted to and dealt with the formal influence and economic domination of Hollywood on international audiences. Class lectures, screenings, and discussions will consider how cinema has changed from a primarily national phenomenon to a transnational form in the twenty-first century.

Extra Time required. Evening Screenings.

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 54961

Seungjoo Yoon

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.) S/Cr/NC

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 270.00 Creative Travel Writing Workshop 6 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
1:50pm4:50pm
Synonym: 55961

Scott D Carpenter

Travelers write. Whether it be in the form of postcards, text messages, blogs, or articles, writing serves to anchor memory and process difference, making foreign experience understandable to us and accessible to others. While examining key examples of the genre, you will draw on your experiences off-campus for your own work. Student essays will be critiqued in a workshop setting, and all work will be revised before final submission. Some experimentation with blended media is also encouraged.

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CCST 275.00 I'm A Stranger Here Myself 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 302

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 54962

Éva S Pósfay

What do enculturation, tourism, culture shock, "going native," haptics, cross-cultural adjustment, and third culture kids have in common? How do intercultural transitions shape identity? What is intercultural competence? This course explores theories about intercultural contact and tests their usefulness by applying them to the analysis of world literature, case studies, and the visual arts, and by employing students' intercultural experiences as evidence. From individualized, self-reflective exercises to community-oriented group endeavors, our activities will promote new intercultural paradigms in the classroom and the wider community. Course designed for off-campus returnees, students who have lived abroad, or who have experienced being outsiders.

CCST 398.00 The Cross-Cultural Panorama: A Capstone Workshop 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 302

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54963

Scott D Carpenter

The work of Cross-Cultural Studies traverses many disciplines, often engaging with experiences that are difficult to capture in traditional formats. In this course students will create an ePortfolio that reflects, deepens, and narrates the various forms of cross-cultural experience they have had at Carleton, drawing on coursework and off-campus study, as well as such extra-curricular activities as talks, service learning, internships and fellowships. Guided by readings and prompts, students will write a reflective essay articulating the coherence of the parts, describing both the process and the results of their pathway through the minor. Considered a capstone for CCST, but for anyone looking to thread together their experiences across culture. Course is taught as a workshop. 

CLAS 124.00 Roman Archaeology and Art 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 55269

Alex R Knodell

The material worlds of the ancient Romans loom large in our cultural imagination. No other civilization has made as direct a contribution to our own political system or to its physical vestiges of power and authority. From the architecture of the state to visual narratives of propaganda, Roman influence is ubiquitous in the monuments of western civilization. But what were the origins of the Romans? Their innovations? Their technical, artistic, and ideological achievements? How are they relevant today? This course explores these questions and more through the archaeology of the eternal city and beyond.

ECON 201.00 Analysis of Microeconomic Development Models 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 55605

Faress Bhuiyan

This course is the second part of a two-term winter break course sequence beginning with Economics 240. This course will focus on critically analyzing the appropriateness of modern microeconomic development models in the context of Bangladesh. Students exposed to various on-site visits and lectures in Bangladesh during the winter break will be required to research, write and present their views on the reliability of different model assumptions and implications they studied in Economics 240.

Prerequisite: Economics 110, 111 and 240

Participation in Carleton OCS Bangladesh Winter Break Program. Requires fall term registration in ECON 240

ECON 233.00 World Economic History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52942

Jenny Bourne

This course surveys world economic history from Paleolithic times to today. It helps students understand the fundamental forces that drive economic growth and living standards. We address questions such as: How did economic systems function during the ancient and medieval periods? What caused the Industrial Revolution, allowing billions of humans to escape the “Malthusian trap”? Why haven’t all countries experienced economic growth?  Finally, what lessons can we learn from the past to help us better understand what the future may hold? The course focuses on long-term trends, but we will also examine short-run cyclical phenomena such as financial crises.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ENGL 238.00 African Literature in English 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 212

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55108

Kofi Owusu

This is a course on texts drawn from English-speaking Africa since the 1950's. Authors to be read include Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ayi Kwei Armah, Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head, Benjamin Kwakye, and Wole Soyinka.

ENGL 281.07 London Program: Romantic London 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 52954

Constance Walker

The Romantic era (1785-1830) was a time of extraordinary political, intellectual, and social volatility and vitality. With London as our classroom, we will explore the life of the great city at the hub of Romanticism by means of its magnificent public and domestic architecture, fashion and décor, dances, fine arts, journalism and political satire, and literature, including the poetry of Byron, Shelley, and Keats, the essays of Hazlitt and Lamb, and the novels of Austen. Field trips will include visits to the Tate Britain, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the British Library, Sir John Soane's Museum, the Pump Room and Costume Museum at Bath, and the Royal Pavilion at Brighton.

Prerequisite: Participation in OCS London program

Participation in Carleton OCS London Program

ENTS 244.00 Biodiversity Conservation and Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 54950

Tsegaye H Nega

How can the need for intensive human social and economic development be reconciled with the conservation of biodiversity? This course explores the wide range of actions that people take at a local, national, and international level to address this question. We will use political ecology and conservation biology as theoretical frameworks to examine the role of traditional and indigenous approaches to biodiversity conservation as well as contemporary debates about integrated conservation development across a spectrum of cultures in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

ENTS 254.00 Topics in Landscape Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 54951

Tsegaye H Nega

Landscape ecology is an interdisciplinary field that combines the spatial approach of the geographer with the functional approach of the ecologist to understand the ways in which landscape composition and structure affects ecological processes, species abundance, and distribution. Topics include collecting and referencing spatial data at broad scales, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), landscape metrics, simulating change in landscape pattern, landscape connectivity and meta-population dynamics, and reserve design.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

EUST 249.00 The European Union from Constitution to Crisis 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54966

Paul Petzschmann

It has become commonplace to say that Europe is in crisis--yet what does that mean? It is difficult to overestimate the importance of crises considering that the European Union played a large part in overcoming Europe’s “Long Civil War” between 1914 and 1945. The collective decision-making processes created by European treaties are often credited with bringing peace and prosperity to Europe. Yet they have also instituted idiosyncrasies, asymmetries and inequities that stand in the way of solving the continent’s most pressing problems. We will examine decision-making processes in the European Union and the much-debated “democratic deficit” of its institutions. These debates about the foundations of the Union will be rounded off by an overview and brief history of Euroscepticism. The course will include a discussion of a number of case studies that confront member states of the European Union across the board: the reconstruction of the welfare state, immigration and the refugee crisis, and the rise of the far right. 

FREN 206.00 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 205

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55641

Sandra E Rousseau

Through texts, images and films coming from different continents, this class will present Francophone cultures and discuss the connections and tensions that have emerged between France and other French speaking countries. Focused on oral and written expression this class aims to strengthen students’ linguistic skills while introducing them to the academic discipline of French and Francophone studies. The theme will be school and education in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm
Synonym: 55218

Scott D Carpenter

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 55219)

FREN 239.00 Banned Books 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55663

Cathy Yandell

Recent events in France have highlighted the issues of free speech and religious intolerance, among other cultural questions. Some of the most fascinating and now canonized works in French and Francophone literature were once banned because they called into question the political, religious, or moral sensibilities of the day. Even now, books deemed to be subversive are routinely censored in certain Francophone cultures. Through readings of such writers as Rabelais, Voltaire, Sade, Camus, Franz Fanon, Assia Djebar, and Hergé (Tintin), as well as contemporary articles from Charlie Hebdo, we will explore the crucial role of forbidden works in their cultural contexts.

Prerequisite: French 204 or equivalent

FREN 340.00 Arts of Brevity: Short Fiction 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55221

Scott D Carpenter

The rise of newspapers and magazines in the nineteenth century promotes a variety of short genres that will remain popular to the present day: short stories, prose poetry, vignettes, theatrical scenes. In this short course (first five weeks of the term) we'll study short works by such authors as Diderot, Sand, Balzac, Mérimée, Flaubert, Allais, Tardieu, Le Clézio. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

1st 5 weeks

FREN 341.00 Madame Bovary and Her Avatars 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55222

Scott D Carpenter

Decried as scandalous, heralded as the first "modern" novel, Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (published in 1857) sparked debate, spawned both detractors and followers, and became a permanent fixture in French culture and even the French language. In this five-week course we will read the novel, study its cultural context and impact, and see how it has been variously re-interpreted in film and other media. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

2nd 5 weeks

GEOL 245.53 “When the Earth Shook…” Earthquakes in Human History & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 54729

William L North, Mary E Savina

Earthquakes (and associated tsunamis) are complex, fascinating geological events, and they often have profound and devastating effects on human societies. In this course, we will explore the changing human understandings of earthquakes and their geological mechanisms from antiquity to the present; the development of techniques for understanding them; and the ways in which societies prepare for and respond to life in seismically active zones of the world. Case studies will form an important element of the course and students will pursue research using scientific and humanistic sources to understand earthquakes in all their dimensions. There is a required lab.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or prior History course

Extra Time required

GERM 152.00 Personhood 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 54625

Seth Elliott Meyer

What is it to be human? What is the difference between human and animal? How do technology and AI alter our understanding of humanity? How does the rhetoric of personhood affect our judgment of others? What is an immigrant, a migrant, a refugee, a foreigner, an alien? In this English-language survey of German thought and literature, we will ask these questions with foundational philosophers from the Enlightenment to the present, engage with contemporary theorists on post-colonialism and nationalism, and rethink the concept of personhood by analyzing crucial new contributions from literature, theater, film, and art. Taught in English.

GERM 267.00 Catastrophe! Natural Disaster in German Literature 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 54623

Kiley Kost

Are natural disasters ever really natural? In this course, taught in German, we will read works of literature and poetry that portray disaster. Focusing on disaster as the site of interaction between humans and the environment, we will explore and discuss the impact of modern technology, contemporary environmental issues, and the concept of disaster in the shadow of war. Thinking in terms of environmental justice, we will also consider who is impacted by such disasters and in what ways. We will read various genres of literature including works by Hoffmann, Frisch, Wolf, Haushofer and Maron among many others.

Prerequisite: German 204 or equivalent

HIST 138.00 Crusades, Mission, and the Expansion of Europe 6 credits

Victoria Morse

This course examines the complex and sometimes contradictory roles of crusade and mission in the gradual expansion of Europe (eleventh -fifteenth century) into the eastern Mediterranean, the Iberian peninsula, the Baltic, and even Central Asia. We will examine questions like: What did "crusade" or "mission" mean? How did people respond to, resist, or co-opt these enterprises? Did crusade and mission expand Europeans' knowledge of other cultures? In addition to critical analysis of primary sources and current scholarship, the course will offer opportunities to share knowledge with a broader public.

HIST 152.00 History of Early China 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 54999

Seungjoo Yoon

At what point can we talk about the formation of China as an organized political entity? What did it mean to be a Chinese at different points in time? This course is an introduction to the history of China from its beginnings to the end of the Han dynasty in 220. Students will examine the emergence of philosophical debates on human nature, historical consciousness of time and recording, and ritual theories in formation. Students will focus on the interplay between statecraft and religion, between ethnicity and identity, and between intellectual (e.g., Confucianism) and socio-cultural history (e.g., feminine and popular mentalities).

HIST 165.00 From Young Turks to Arab Revolutions: A Cultural History of the Modern Middle East 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55000

Adeeb Khalid

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the wider Muslim world from the eighteenth century to the present. We will discuss the cultural and religious diversity of the Muslim world and its varied interactions with modernity. We will find that the history of the Muslim world is inextricably linked to that of its neighbors, and we will encounter colonialism, anti-colonialism, nationalism, and socialism, as well as a variety of different Islamic movements.

HIST 242.00 Communism, Cold War, Collapse: Russia Since Stalin 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 55002

Adeeb Khalid

In this course we will explore the history of Russia and other former Soviet states in the period after the death of Stalin, exploring the workings of the communist system and the challenges it faced internally and internationally. We will investigate the nature of the late Soviet state and look at the different trajectories Russia and other post-Soviet states have followed since the end of the Soviet Union.

HIST 346.00 The Holocaust 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55006

David G Tompkins

This course will grapple with the difficult and complicated phenomenon of the genocide of the Jews of Europe. We will explore anti-Semitism in its historical context, both in the German-speaking lands as well as in Europe as a whole. The experience of Jews in Nazi Germany will be an area of focus, but this class will look at European Jews more broadly, both before and during the Second World War. The question of responsibility and guilt will be applied to Germans as well as to other European societies, and an exploration of victims will extend to other affected groups.

LATN 233.00 The Catilinarian Conspiracy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54568

Jake Morton

In 63 BC, a frustrated Roman nobleman named Catiline attempted to start a revolution to overthrow the Roman government, only to be exposed and stopped by the politician Cicero. At least, that is how Cicero depicts it, and we will read part of Cicero's speech that led to Catiline's condemnation. However, we will also read the contemporary Roman historian Sallust's magisterial account of the events which reveals a more complicated story about both Catiline and the senators' response. These are two of the greatest works in Latin literature and reading them together will allow us to investigate what really happened in 63 BC.

Prerequisite: Latin 204 or equivalent

LCST 245.00 The Critical Toolbox: Who's Afraid of Theory? 6 credits

Sandra E Rousseau

This class introduces students to the various theoretical frameworks and the many approaches scholars can use when analyzing a text (whether this text is a film, an image, a literary piece or a performance). What do words like ‘structuralism,’ ‘ecocriticism,’ 'cultural studies,' and ‘postcolonial studies’ refer to? Most importantly, how do they help us understand the world around us? This class will be organized around interdisciplinary theoretical readings and exercises in cultural analysis.

Prerequisite: At least one 200- or 300-level course in Literary/Artistic Analysis (in any language) or instructor permission

MUSC 188.00 Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M032

MTWTHF
4:30pm6:00pm
Synonym: 53857

Gao Hong

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and a Chinese approach to musical training in order to learn and perform music from China. In addition to the Wednesday meeting time, there will be one sectional rehearsal each week.

Prerequisite: Previous experience in a music ensemble, Chinese Musical instruments or instructor permission

MUSC 192.00 West African Drum Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M026

MTWTHF
5:30pm6:30pm
Synonym: 53860

Jay L Johnson

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.

Prerequisite: Music 199 and/or instructor permission

PE 338.07 Sports and Globalization in London and Seville: Global Athletics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 53002

Bob Carlson

With their rich history and current success, English and Spanish sport will serve as a framework to examine the emergence of contemporary athletics and current issues facing participants, coaches, administrators, and spectators. The course will explore the world of sport and specifically football (soccer) from a generalist perspective. London and Seville will provide rich and unique opportunities to learn how sport and society intersect. With classroom activities, site visits, field trips to matches, museums, and stadiums students will examine sport from an historical and cultural perspective while keeping in mind how our globalized world impacts sport. Lastly, we will seek to understand ways athletics can break down barriers and create understanding between others.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

PHIL 213.00 Ethics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 55076

Daniel M Groll

How should we live? This is the fundamental question for the study of ethics. This course looks at classic and contemporary answers to the fundamental question from Socrates to Kant to modern day thinkers. Along the way, we consider slightly (but only slightly) more tractable questions such as: What reason is there to be moral? Is there such a thing as moral knowledge (and if so, how do we get it)? What are the fundamental principles of right and wrong (if there are any at all)? Is morality objective?

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55537

Eric S Mosinger

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 55538)

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55539

Summer N Forester

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 238.07 Sport & Globalization London/Seville Pgm: Globalization and Development: Lessons from Int'l Football 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 53003

Bob Carlson

This course uses international football (soccer) as a lens to analyze topics in globalization, such as immigration and labor, inequality, foreign investment, trade in services, and intellectual property. Students will be presented with key debates in these areas and then use cases from international football as illustrations. Focusing on the two wealthiest leagues in Europe, the English Premier League and the Spanish Liga, students will address key issues in the study of globalization and development, and in doing so enhance their understanding of the world, sports, and sport's place in the world.

Participation in Carleton OCS London & Seville Program

POSC 239.00 The Poor and the Powerless 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55554

Charisse E Burden-Stelly

This course examines the foundations of development and globalization, their representations as historical processes, their manifestations over time, and their advocates and detractors. This will be done against the backdrop of empirical and substantive representations of actually-existing development outcomes and globalization processes, their organization, and their practices. This course employs a critical approach to development and is taught from a political economy perspective. In particular, it deals with the relationship between theory, ideology and practice by contrasting classical approaches with critical, Marxist, and radical approaches. It examines outcomes of development practice, both positive and negative, through a focus on globalization.

POSC 241.00 Ethnic Conflict 6 credits

Dev Gupta

Ethnic conflict is a persistent and troubling challenge for those interested in preserving international peace and stability. By one account, ethnic violence has claimed more than ten million lives since 1945, and in the 1990s, ethnic conflicts comprised nearly half of all ongoing conflicts around the world. In this course, we will attempt to understand the conditions that contribute to ethnic tensions, identify the triggers that lead to escalation, and evaluate alternative ideas for managing and solving such disputes. The course will draw on a number of cases, including Rwanda, Bosnia, and Northern Ireland.

POSC 242.00 Middle East Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 54448

Summer N Forester

This course introduces the politics and political structures of states in the Middle East. We explore the political origins of Middle Eastern states, and investigate how regional politics are shaped by colonialism, religion, tribes, the family, and more. We examine the persistence of authoritarianism and its links to other issues like nationalism and militarism. The course covers how recent and current events like the revolutionary movements of the ‘Arab Spring’ civil society affect the states and their societies. We conclude with a consideration of the future of Middle Eastern politics, evaluating lingering concerns and emerging prospects for liberalization and reform.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55555

Greg Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy. This course serves as the gateway for the Political Economy Minor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215 strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 331.00 Cooperation and Conflict* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm
Synonym: 55556

Greg Marfleet

Why do countries go to war? What conditions promote a lasting peace? These may well be the two most important and enduring questions in international politics. The course combines an exploration of various theoretical approaches to war and peace—including rational, psychological and structural models—with an empirical analysis of the onset, escalation, and resolution of conflict. We investigate changing patterns in the frequency of global violence and identify where it occurs more (and less) often and assess whether there is an overall trend toward a more peaceful world.

POSC 345.00 Politics of Dictatorship* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 54455

Kent Freeze

With over half of the world's population living in non-democracies, understanding the nature of authoritarian regimes is a critical component of comparative political science. We will examine the variety of authoritarian regimes around the world, the nature of state-society relations in different authoritarian regimes, as well as the strategies employed by dictators to maintain stability and control. We will supplement the more general theories of authoritarian rule with detailed case studies of particular regimes.

POSC 378.07 Political Economy & Ecology of Southeast Asia: Social Changes in Southeast Asia 6 credits

Tun Myint

Informed by the assigned readings, students will visit markets, factories, farms, and various cultural and natural sites to see first-hand the changes and challenges occurring in these areas. The course covers: (1) issues of livelihood transition from rural to urban; (2) the interaction between market systems and social relations; and (3) the impact on society of changes in physical infrastructures such as roads and telecommunication. Students will keep a journal and produce three thematic short essays, a 15-20-minute video, or a well-organized blog to document their learning.

POSC 379.07 Political Economy and Ecology of S.E. Asia: Diversity of Social Ecological Systems in Southeast Asia 6 credits

Tun Myint

Connecting the first and the second components, this course examines key actors, issues, and interests in the political economy of and ecology of Southeast Asia. Students will connect economy to ecology in Southeast Asia by connecting field experiences and observation to real data, facts, and cases that illustrate the interaction between economy and ecology. This course requires students to identify a topic of interest based on their field experience, research it using techniques taught in the field research and methods course, and write a research report in the form of a term paper. 

RELG 122.00 Introduction to Islam 6 credits

Ahoo Najafian

This course provides a general introduction to Islam, as a textual and lived tradition. Students will read from the Qur'an and the traditions of the Prophet Muhammad, engaging them both as historical resources and as dynamic and contested objects that have informed Muslim life in diverse ways throughout the centuries. Through following a thread from scripture, through the interpretive sciences (chiefly law and theology), and into an analysis of Muslim life in the contemporary world, students will explore answers Muslim thinkers have given to major questions of our shared existence, with both fidelity to the texts and flexibility to present demands. Though the focus of this course is not on Islam's role in current events, through attaining a solid introduction to the tradition--its sociology, its history, and its modes of reasoning--students will attain the knowledge necessary to begin to engage those events with a critical and informed mind.

RELG 211.00 Race and Religion: Slavery, Colonialism, and their Afterlives 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55837

Tanzeen R Doha

This course examines the emergence and entanglement of “race” and “religion” as categories, especially in relation to slavery and colonialism, and with regard to the study of Islam as well as other traditions. By touching on themes in postcolonial theory, psychoanalysis, black liberation theology, and decolonial studies, we will ask questions such as: What is the relation between the invention of the “infidel” and the invention of the “negro”? How did the classification of non-Christians by missionaries help shape the emergence of racial “science”? Is the construction of the “enemy combatant” in our contemporary age of terror informed by the fifteenth century classification of natives as “savages”? 

RELG 234.00 Angels, Demons, and Evil 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55621

Sonja G Anderson

Besides humans, animals, and gods, what other beings populate the cosmos? Where do evil, sin, and suffering come from? What can be done about them, and can their existence be justified philosophically? This course explores the problem of evil through an exploration of angels and demons in Jewish, Christian, and Greco-Roman traditions from antiquity to the present, with a focus on late antiquity. Special attention will be given to the bodies of angels and demons: Are they gendered? Where do they dwell? What do they know, and what can they do to humans? This course will also consider modern articulations of systemic, historical injustice.

RELG 237.00 Yoga: Religion, History, Practice 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55622

Kristin C Bloomer

This class will immerse students in the study of yoga from its first textual representations to its current practice around the world. Transnationally, yoga has been unyoked from religion. But the Sanskrit root yuj means to “add,” “join,” or “unite”—and in Indian philosophy and practice it was: a method of devotion; a way to “yoke” the body/mind; a means to unite with Ultimate Reality; a form of concentration and meditation. We will concentrate on texts dating back thousands of years, from Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras to the Bhagavad Gita—and popular texts of today. Come prepared to wear loose clothing.

RELG 264.00 Islam, Politics, and the Secular 6 credits

Tanzeen R Doha

From the Islamic state to Islamic secularism, from progressivism to jihadism, this course examines a broad range of Islamic political thought and practice. Through exploring thinkers and movements both classical and modern who have shaped contemporary conversation, students will get beneath the headlines and come to a robust understanding of the role of Islam in modern politics across the globe.

RELG 362.00 Spirit Possession 6 credits

Kristin C Bloomer

This course considers spirit possession in relation to religion, gender, and agency. Through surveying a number of works on spirit possession--recent and past, theoretical and ethnographic--we will analyze representations of the female subject in particular and arguments about agency that attend these representations. This class will explicitly look at post-colonial accounts of spirit possession and compare them to Euro-American Christian conceptions of personhood. We will consider how these Euro-Christian conceptions might undergird secular-liberal constructions of agency, and contribute to feminist ideas about the proper female subject.

RUSS 205.00 Russian in Cultural Contexts 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 242

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 55279

Anna M Dotlibova

In this course students continue to develop skills of narration, listening comprehension, and writing, while exploring issues of contemporary Russian life and consciousness. The issues are examined from the position of two cultures: American and Russian. The course draws on a variety of sources for reading and viewing, including the periodic press, film, and music.

Prerequisite: Russian 204 or equivalent

RUSS 237.00 Beyond Beef Stroganoff: Food in Russian Culture 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55285

Laura Goering

How did the Russian peasant stove shape culinary culture? Why did Catherine the Great force her subjects to cultivate potatoes? How did the October Revolution change the way Soviet citizens ate? In this course we will study key aspects of Russian history and culture through the lens of culinary history. Topics will include: food and fasting in Russian Orthodoxy; food, class and power under the tsars; high Russian (or is it French?) culture of the nineteenth century; Soviet policies for feeding the worker; non-Russian cuisines in the Soviet Union; drinking culture and anti-alcohol campaigns; food and nationalism in the twenty-first century. Includes hands-on sessions on Russian food preparation. In English.

In translation

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55468

Jerome M Levi

An introduction to cultural and social anthropology which develops the theoretical rationale of the discipline through the integration of ethnographic accounts with an analysis of major trends in historical and contemporary thought. Examples of analytical problems selected for discussion include the concepts of society and culture, value systems, linguistics, economic, social, political and religious institutions, as well as ethnographic method and the ethical position of anthropology.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 55469)

SOAN 233.00 Anthropology of Food 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 55482

Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

Food is the way to a person's heart but perhaps even more interesting, the window into a society's soul. Simply speaking understating a society's foodways is the best way to comprehend the complexity between people, culture and nature. This course explores how anthropologists use food to understand different aspects of human behavior, from food procurement and consumption practices to the politics of nutrition and diets. In doing so we hope to elucidate how food is more than mere sustenance and that often the act of eating is a manifestation of power, resistance, identity, and community.

Sophomore Priority, $30 fee automatically charged to tuition bill

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 233.WL0 (Synonym 55483)

SOAN 262.00 Anthropology of Health and Illness 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55484

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

An ethnographic approach to beliefs and practices regarding health and illness in numerous societies worldwide. This course examines patients, practitioners, and the social networks and contexts through which therapies are managed to better understand medical systems as well as the significance of the anthropological study of misfortune. Specific topics include the symbolism of models of illness, the ritual management of misfortune and of life crisis events, the political economy of health, therapy management, medical pluralism, and cross-cultural medical ethics.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 331.00 Anthropological Thought and Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55472

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

A systematic introduction to the theoretical foundations of social and cultural anthropology with special emphasis given to twentieth century British, French and American schools. The course deals with such seminal figures as Morgan, Boas, Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown, Levi-Straus, Harris, Sahlins, Bourdieu, Geertz, and Appadurai. The reading strikes a balance between ethnographic accounts and theoretical statements.

Prerequisite: Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 or instructor permission

SOAN 333.00 Environmental Anthropology 6 credits

Constanza Ocampo-Raeder

Can we learn to use resources sustainably? Are there people in the world that know how to manage their environment appropriately? What are the causes behind environmental degradation? These questions are commonly asked in public and academic forums but what discussions often overlook is the fact that these are fundamentally social questions and thus social analysis is needed to understand them fully. This course aims at exploring key issues of human/nature interactions by using anthropological critiques and frameworks of analysis to show how culture is a critical variable to understanding these interactions in all their complexity.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55316

Jorge Brioso

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 203

MTWTHF
12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55317

Silvia López

An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 242.00 Introduction to Latin American Literature 6 credits

Silvia López

An introductory course to reading major texts in Spanish provides an historical survey of the literary movements within Latin American literature from the pre-Hispanic to the contemporary period. Recommended as a foundation course for further study. Not open to seniors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or proficiency

Not open to seniors

SPAN 328.00 The Contemporary Spanish Fictional Essay 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55321

Palmar M Álvarez-Blanco

In this course we will study the various meanings of what has been labeled, aesthetically and sociologically, as the Post-Modernist age, or Late Modernity. We will also study the relationship between "postmodernism," the late-capitalist era and what has been called the "culture of contentment" or "culture of well-being." In addition, we will attempt to understand the interactions that exist between consumer culture, market societies and dominant ideology. To develop this theme we will focus on Spain, but will also continually establish cross-cultural comparisons with other countries. This course addresses many different genres (e.g. fictional essays, documentaries, gag cartoons, graphic novels, comics). The course also features evening films and guest lectures.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or 207

Extra Time Required

SPAN 330.00 The Invention of the Modern Novel: Cervantes' Don Quijote 6 credits

Jorge Brioso

Among other things, Don Quijote is a "remake," an adaptation of several literary models popular at the time the picaresque novel, the chivalry novel, the sentimental novel, the Byzantine novel, the Italian novella, etc. This course will examine the ways in which Cervantes transformed these models to create what is considered by many the first "modern" novel in European history.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

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