ENROLL Course Search

Saved Courses (0)

Your search for courses for 20/WI and with Overlay: QRE found 87 courses. New Search

ASTR 110.00 Introduction to Astronomy 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54709

Cindy Blaha

An introduction to current astronomy with an emphasis on how we know what we know. Topics include the solar system; the life cycles of stars; pulsars, quasars, and black holes; and the history and future fate of the universe. No mathematics background beyond high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed.

BIOL 125.52 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54888

Stephan G Zweifel, Matt Rand

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL2 (Synonym 54893)

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 54889

Stephan G Zweifel, Matt Rand, Annie Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 54894)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54890

Stephan G Zweifel, Matt Rand, Annie Bosacker

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 54895)

BIOL 125.57 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54891

Stephan G Zweifel, Matt Rand, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL7 (Synonym 54896)

BIOL 125.59 Genes, Evolution, and Development and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54892

Stephan G Zweifel, Matt Rand, Sarah Deel

Emphasizes the role of genetic information in biological systems. Under this theme, we cover subjects from the molecular to the population levels of organization. Topics include the nature of inheritance and life cycles, structure/function of DNA, gene expression and regulation, the changing genetic makeup of species as they evolve, and the development of individual organisms from zygotes.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL9 (Synonym 54897)

BIOL 126.52 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 54898

Mike Nishizaki, Raka M Mitra, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL2 (Synonym 54901)

BIOL 126.53 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 54899

Raka M Mitra, Mike Nishizaki

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL3 (Synonym 54902)

BIOL 126.54 Energy Flow in Biological Systems and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 104 / Hulings 115

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 54900

Raka M Mitra, Mike Nishizaki, David Hougen-Eitzman

Follow the pathways through which energy and matter are acquired, stored, and utilized within cells, organisms, and ecosystems. The focus moves among the different levels of organization from protein function to nutrient movement through ecosystems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 126.WL4 (Synonym 54903)

BIOL 210.00 Global Change Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54904

Environmental problems are caused by a complex mix of physical, biological, social, economic, political, and technological factors. This course explores how these environmental problems affect life on Earth by examining the biological processes underlying natural ecological systems and the effects of global environmental changes such as resources consumption and overharvesting, land-use change, climate warming, pollution, extinction and biodiversity loss, and invasive species.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115 or 120)

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 210.WL0 (Synonym 54905)

BIOL 240.00 Genetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54906

Jennifer M Wolff

A study of the transmission of genetic information between generations of organisms, and of the mechanism of expression of information within an individual organism. The main emphasis will be on the physical and chemical basis of heredity; mutational, transmissional and functional analysis of the genetic material, and gene expression.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 or instructor permission

BIOL 248.00 Behavioral Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54916

Annie Bosacker

Behavioral ecologists strive to understand the complex ways that ecological pressures influence the evolution of behavioral strategies. It can be argued that animals face a relatively small set of basic challenges: they must acquire food, water, and mates, and they must avoid danger. Yet we see a rich diversity of solutions to these problems. Consider foraging behavior, for example. All animals must acquire energy, but some filter particles out of sea water, others graze on nearly inedible grasses, while still others hunt in cooperative packs. In this course we will consider such topics as foraging, communication, sociality, and conflict. By focusing on the functions and evolutionary histories of behaviors, we strive to better understand the puzzle of behavioral diversity.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 310.00 Immunology 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54907

Debby R Walser-Kuntz

This course will examine the role of the immune system in defense, allergic reactions, and autoimmunity. Topics to be covered include the structure and function of antibodies, cytokines, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in antigen presentation, cellular immunity, immunodeficiencies, and current techniques used to study immune responses.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and either Biology 240 or 280

No lab

BIOL 332.00 Human Physiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 48, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54908

Fernán Jaramillo

Human Physiology seeks to understand the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the diverse functions of the body. Course topics include the function and regulation of the various physiological systems (nervous, circulatory, endocrine, excretory, respiratory, digestive, etc.), biochemistry, cellular physiology, homeostasis and acid-base chemistry. The study of human physiology provides the principal groundwork for internal medicine, pharmacology, and other related health fields. The laboratory includes a variety of experiments focusing on the function and regulation of the human body.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 333; Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 333 required.

BIOL 368.00 Seminar: Developmental Neurobiology 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54918

Eric D Hoopfer

An examination of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying development of the nervous system. We will survey recent studies of a variety of model organisms to explore key steps in neuronal development including neural induction, patterning, specification of neuronal identity, axonal guidance, synapse formation, cell death and regeneration.

Prerequisite: Biology 240 or Biology 280

BIOL 372.00 Seminar: Structural Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 107

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54911

Rou-Jia Sung

The ability to visualize macromolecules at atomic detail has significantly advanced our understanding of macromolecular structure and function. This course will provide an overview of fundamental experimental methodologies underlying structure determination, followed by primary literature-based discussions in which students will present and critically discuss classic foundational papers as well as examples from the current literature that have advanced our understanding of macromolecule structure and function.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126; and either Biology 280, Biology 380 or Chemistry 320

CHEM 113.52 Concepts of Chemistry & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 54734

Steven M Drew

A one-term chemistry course designed for non-science majors. In this course we examine what gives rise to three-dimensional shapes of molecules and we explore how the structure and composition of molecules gives rise to chemical reactivity. Our goal is to understand readily observable phenomena (e.g. removal of grease by soap, storage of toxins in fat tissues, cancer, viruses, etc.). Topics include those of current global interest such as anthropogenic forces on the environment and energy producing technologies. The course includes one four-hour lab per week.

CHEM 123.52 Principles of Chemistry I With Problem Solving & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm10:45am11:50am11:10am12:20pm10:45am11:50am12:00pm1:00pm
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 53160

Chris Calderone

An introduction to chemistry for students who have taken high school chemistry or Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128. This section of Chemistry with problem solving is periodically offered for students who wish to further develop their general analytical and critical thinking skills. This smaller section will have additional class meetings for problem solving and review. Chemistry 123 with problem solving is appropriate for students who would like to have more scheduled time to work with a faculty member on developing their scientific reasoning skills and understanding of the foundations of chemistry.

Prerequisite: Adequate secondary school preparation as indicated by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation (Chemistry Home Page) or Chemistry 122

CHEM 123.54 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54735

Kim Huynh

An introduction to chemistry for students who have taken high school chemistry or Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Adequate secondary school preparation as indicated by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation (Chemistry Home Page) or Chemistry 122.

CHEM 123.59 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54737

Kim Huynh

An introduction to chemistry for students who have taken high school chemistry or Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Adequate secondary school preparation as indicated by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation (Chemistry Home Page) or Chemistry 122.

CHEM 233.54 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54738

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.59 Organic Chemistry I & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54739

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 234.52 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54741

Joe Chihade

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 234.57 Organic Chemistry II & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54742

Joe Chihade

The chemistry of functional groups is continued from Chemistry 233, and is extended to the multifunctional compounds found in nature, in particular carbohydrates and proteins. The laboratory focuses upon inquiry-based projects and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 233

CHEM 302.01 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm3:10pm4:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54743

Will Hollingsworth

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.02 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54744

Will Hollingsworth

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.03 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm3:10pm4:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54745

Trish Ferrett

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 302.04 Quantum Spectroscopy Laboratory 3 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54746

Trish Ferrett

This lab course emphasizes spectroscopic studies relevant to quantum chemistry, including experiments utilizing UV-VIS, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and visible emission spectroscopy. Corequisite: Chemistry 344.

CHEM 306.01 Spectrometric Characterization of Chemical Compounds 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323 / Anderson Hall 325

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54753

Matt Whited

This combined lecture and lab course teaches students how to use modern spectrometric techniques for the structural characterization of molecules. Lectures will cover topics and problems in the theory and practical applications associated with GC-Mass Spectrometry, ESI-Mass Spectrometry, Infrared, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H, 13C, and 2D experiments). Students will apply all of these techniques in the laboratory for the structural characterization of known and unknown molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234 or instructor permission

CHEM 306.02 Spectrometric Characterization of Chemical Compounds 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323 / Anderson Hall 325

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54754

Matt Whited

This combined lecture and lab course teaches students how to use modern spectrometric techniques for the structural characterization of molecules. Lectures will cover topics and problems in the theory and practical applications associated with GC-Mass Spectrometry, ESI-Mass Spectrometry, Infrared, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H, 13C, and 2D experiments). Students will apply all of these techniques in the laboratory for the structural characterization of known and unknown molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234 or instructor permission

CHEM 330.00 Instrumental Chemical Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 8, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54755

Deborah S Gross

This course covers the basic principles of quantitative instrumental chemical analysis. Course topics include chromatography, electroanalytical chemistry, analytical spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The background needed to understand the theory and application of these instrumental techniques will be covered. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore current research in the field of analytical chemistry through the reading and presentation of articles from the primary literature.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230) and Chemistry 233. Requires concurrent registration in Chemistry 331

Requires concurrent registration in Chemistry 331

CHEM 331.00 Instrumental Chemical Analysis Laboratory 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
1:00pm5:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54756

Deborah S Gross

This laboratory provides students with experience in using instrumental methods for quantitative chemical analysis. Laboratory work consists of several assigned experiments that use instrumental techniques such as liquid and gas chromatography, UV spectrophotometry and fluorometry, mass spectrometry, and voltammetry. This laboratory concludes with an instrumental analysis project that is researched and designed by student groups.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 (230), 233 and concurrent registration in Chemistry 330

CHEM 330 required.

CHEM 344.00 Quantum Chemistry 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 54747

Will Hollingsworth

This course introduces quantum mechanics with an emphasis on chemical and spectroscopic applications. The focus will be on atomic and molecular quantum behavior involving electrons, rotations, and vibrations. The objective is to develop both a deeper understanding of bonding as well as an appreciation of how spectroscopy provides insight into the microscopic world of molecules.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128, Mathematics 120 or 211 and six credits from Physics 131 to 165

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55022

Aaron W Bauer

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL1 (Synonym 55025)

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55023

Layla K Oesper

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL2 (Synonym 55026)

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 55024

Tanya M Amert

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55027

Amy Csizmar Dalal

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55028

Anna N Rafferty

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL2 (Synonym 55029)

CS 344.00 Human-Computer Interaction 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55043

Sneha Narayan

The field of human-computer interaction addresses two fundamental questions: how do people interact with technology, and how can technology enhance the human experience? In this course, we will explore technology through the lens of the end user: how can we design effective, aesthetically pleasing technology, particularly user interfaces, to satisfy user needs and improve the human condition? How do people react to technology and learn to use technology? What are the social, societal, health, and ethical implications of technology? The course will focus on design methodologies, techniques, and processes for developing, testing, and deploying user interfaces.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 or instructor permission

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55581

Bruce R Dalgaard

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55582

Ethan L Struby

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55583

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55584

Mark T Kanazawa

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55603

Nathan D Grawe

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 201.00 Analysis of Microeconomic Development Models 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 55605

Faress Bhuiyan

This course is the second part of a two-term winter break course sequence beginning with Economics 240. This course will focus on critically analyzing the appropriateness of modern microeconomic development models in the context of Bangladesh. Students exposed to various on-site visits and lectures in Bangladesh during the winter break will be required to research, write and present their views on the reliability of different model assumptions and implications they studied in Economics 240.

Prerequisite: Economics 110, 111 and 240

Participation in Carleton OCS Bangladesh Winter Break Program. Requires fall term registration in ECON 240

ECON 233.00 World Economic History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 52942

Jenny Bourne

This course surveys world economic history from Paleolithic times to today. It helps students understand the fundamental forces that drive economic growth and living standards. We address questions such as: How did economic systems function during the ancient and medieval periods? What caused the Industrial Revolution, allowing billions of humans to escape the “Malthusian trap”? Why haven’t all countries experienced economic growth?  Finally, what lessons can we learn from the past to help us better understand what the future may hold? The course focuses on long-term trends, but we will also examine short-run cyclical phenomena such as financial crises.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 55606

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 264.00 Health Care Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55608

Nathan D Grawe

This course will focus on the economics of medical care and how health care markets and systems work. We will consider both private health insurance markets and publicly provided social health insurance. The changes which demography, technology and the Affordable Health Care Act are bringing to health care delivery will be examined. Some time will be devoted to understanding the health care systems in other countries. This is a discussion course.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55585

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

ECON 331.00 Intermediate Macro Theory 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55586

Yaniv Ben-Ami

Analysis of the forces determining the general level of output, employment, and prices with special emphasis on the role of money and on interest rate determination. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and Mathematics 215 (or Mathematics 275 or permission of the instructor) and Economics 110 and 111

ENTS 244.00 Biodiversity Conservation and Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 54950

Tsegaye H Nega

How can the need for intensive human social and economic development be reconciled with the conservation of biodiversity? This course explores the wide range of actions that people take at a local, national, and international level to address this question. We will use political ecology and conservation biology as theoretical frameworks to examine the role of traditional and indigenous approaches to biodiversity conservation as well as contemporary debates about integrated conservation development across a spectrum of cultures in North America, Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

ENTS 254.00 Topics in Landscape Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 54951

Tsegaye H Nega

Landscape ecology is an interdisciplinary field that combines the spatial approach of the geographer with the functional approach of the ecologist to understand the ways in which landscape composition and structure affects ecological processes, species abundance, and distribution. Topics include collecting and referencing spatial data at broad scales, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), landscape metrics, simulating change in landscape pattern, landscape connectivity and meta-population dynamics, and reserve design.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

GEOL 245.53 “When the Earth Shook…” Earthquakes in Human History & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 54729

William L North, Mary E Savina

Earthquakes (and associated tsunamis) are complex, fascinating geological events, and they often have profound and devastating effects on human societies. In this course, we will explore the changing human understandings of earthquakes and their geological mechanisms from antiquity to the present; the development of techniques for understanding them; and the ways in which societies prepare for and respond to life in seismically active zones of the world. Case studies will form an important element of the course and students will pursue research using scientific and humanistic sources to understand earthquakes in all their dimensions. There is a required lab.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or prior History course

Extra Time required

GEOL 315.52 Paleoclimate 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 54788

Dan Maxbauer

The main objective of paleoclimatology is to reconstruct past climates in order to improve our understanding of the processes involved in controlling Earth’s climate at various timescales. This course will focus on climate reconstructions from local climate archives. Lab and some class time will be dedicated to group research projects. Reading and discussing primary literature is expected along with presentations and writing assignments related to research topics. Laboratories and one weekend field trip included.

Prerequisite: Two 200 level geology courses, or instructor consent

Extra Time Required

IDSC 130.00 Hacking the Humanities 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 026

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55678

Austin P Mason

The digital world is infiltrating the academy and profoundly disrupting the humanities, posing fundamental challenges to traditional models of university education, scholarly research, and academic publication. This course introduces the key concepts, debates and technologies that are shaping the Digital Humanities (DH) revolution, including text encoding, digital mapping (GIS), network analysis, data visualization, and the basic programming languages that power them all. Students in this class will learn to hack the humanities by making a collaborative, publishable DH project, while acquiring the skills and confidence necessary to actively participate in the digital world, both at the university and beyond.

MATH 215.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 54648

Tom Madsen

Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 265-275 Probability-Statistics sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Math 275.

MATH 215.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 54649

Adam Loy

Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 265-275 Probability-Statistics sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Math 275.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: MATH 215.WL2 (Synonym 54652)

MATH 215.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 54650

Owen D Biesel

Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 265-275 Probability-Statistics sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Math 275.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: MATH 215.WL3 (Synonym 54651)

MATH 245.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 54657

Laura M Chihara

A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215 (or equivalent) or 275

MATH 275.00 Introduction to Statistical Inference 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54659

Laura M Chihara

Introduction to modern mathematical statistics. The mathematics underlying fundamental statistical concepts will be covered as well as applications of these ideas to real-life data. Topics include: resampling methods (permutation tests, bootstrap intervals), classical methods (parametric hypothesis tests and confidence intervals), parameter estimation, goodness-of-fit tests, regression, and Bayesian methods. The statistical package R will be used to analyze data sets.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 265

MATH 280.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 201

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 54660

Adam Loy

Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 245 and instructor permission

Waitlist Only. Instructor Permission required.

MATH 285.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 54661

Katie St. Clair

This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, clean up and manipulation, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, understanding and visualizing spatial and network data, and supervised and unsupervised classification methods. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215 or Mathematics 275

MUSC 204.00 Theory II: Musical Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 53873

Justin M London

An investigation into the nature of musical sounds and the way they are combined to form rhythms, melodies, harmonies, and form. Topics include the spectral composition of musical pitches, the structure of musical scales and their influence on melody, chords and their interval content, and the symmetry and complexity of rhythmic patterns. Student work includes building a musical instrument, programming a drum machine, analyzing the statistical distribution of pitches in a folksong corpus, and form in the music of the Grateful Dead.

Prerequisite: The ability to read music, as assessed by a diagnostic exam administered at the start of the term

PHIL 226.00 Love and Friendship 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Laird 212

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55077

Allison E Murphy

This course will consider various philosophical views on the nature of love and friendship. It will focus on both the history of philosophical thinking about these notions from Plato and Aristotle to the twentieth century and a variety of contemporary views on the meaning of love and friendship that derive their insight from the most recent studies of emotion, agency, action, rationality, moral value, and motivation. We will also look at the variations in the understanding of love and friendship among the members of the same culture and across cultures.

PHYS 143.52 Physical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55410

Helen K Minsky

This course begins with an introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 132, 141, 142, 144, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 143.WL2 (Synonym 55411)

PHYS 144.54 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55413

Ryan C Terrien, Arjendu K Pattanayak

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 132, 141, 142, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL4 (Synonym 55415)

PHYS 144.57 Astrophysical Systems: Mechanics and Relativity & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 55414

Ryan C Terrien

This course begins by considering basic principles of physics in the realm of planetary systems, black holes and dark matter in the universe. Conservation of energy and momentum will be used to explore large-scale phenomena in the cosmos. The course moves beyond the Newtonian framework to address topics including special relativity and also selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Previous completion or concurrent registration in Mathematics 120 or 121. Not open to students who have completed Physics 131, 132, 141, 142, 143, 145 or 151 at Carleton.

Held for First year students. Appropriate for students with prior calculus-based physics course such as an AP or IB course.

Waitlist for Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors: PHYS 144.WL7 (Synonym 55416)

PHYS 165.52 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55417

Marty Baylor, Barry N Costanzi

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 132, 141, 142, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 165.59 Introduction to Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55418

Marty Baylor, Chris West

A study of the principles of electricity, magnetism, and optics with an emphasis on real-world applications including electronics, laser physics, astronomy, and medicine. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electric potentials, DC and AC circuits, geometric and wave optics, and relevant properties of matter. Designed for science majors who want additional background in physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 132, 141, 142, 143, 144, or 145. Mathematics 120 or 121 suggested

PHYS 231.00 Analytical and Computational Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 32, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 55419

Jay D Tasson

An analytical and computational treatment of classical mechanics using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms. A variety of systems, including some whose equations of motion cannot be solved analytically, will be explored. Possible examples include harmonic oscillators, central-force problems, chaotic dynamics, astrophysical systems, and medieval siege engines.

Prerequisite: Physics 131, 132, 141, 142 or 144 and Mathematics 210 or 211 or instructor permission

Formerly PHYS 229/230

PHYS 343.54 Electronics & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Old Music Hall 103 / Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55698

Barry N Costanzi

A study of the electrical circuits and electronics underlying modern physics instrumentation. Includes an introduction to microprocessor and microcomputer design. Approximately equal emphasis on analog and digital electronics. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 235

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55539

Summer N Forester

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 212.00 Environmental Justice 6 credits

Kimberly K Smith

The environmental justice movement seeks greater participation by marginalized communities in environmental policy, and equity in the distribution of environmental harms and benefits. This course will examine the meaning of "environmental justice," the history of the movement, the empirical foundation for the movement's claims, and specific policy questions. Our focus is the United States, but students will have the opportunity to research environmental justice in other countries.

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 55552

Kent Freeze

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 115, 215, 245, 275 or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 55555

Greg Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy. This course serves as the gateway for the Political Economy Minor.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 215 strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 315.00 Polarization, Parties, and Power* 6 credits

Melanie Freeze

How have political parties shaped the distribution of power and political landscape in the United States? This course explores theories of political party development, third-party dynamics in a two-party system, and the rise of ideological and party polarization in the United States. We will engage with scholarly debates that grapple with the extent and implications of polarization in the American case at all levels of government, in the electorate, and in interpersonal interactions.

POSC 331.00 Cooperation and Conflict* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm
Synonym: 55556

Greg Marfleet

Why do countries go to war? What conditions promote a lasting peace? These may well be the two most important and enduring questions in international politics. The course combines an exploration of various theoretical approaches to war and peace—including rational, psychological and structural models—with an empirical analysis of the onset, escalation, and resolution of conflict. We investigate changing patterns in the frequency of global violence and identify where it occurs more (and less) often and assess whether there is an overall trend toward a more peaceful world.

PSYC 200.00 Measurement and Data Analysis in Psychology 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL35

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55346

Mija M Van Der Wege

The course considers the role of measurement and data analysis focused on behavioral sciences. Various forms of measurement and standards for the evaluation of measures are explored. Students learn how to summarize, organize, and evaluate data using a variety of techniques that are applicable to research in psychology and other disciplines. Among the analyses discussed and applied are tests of means, various forms of analysis of variance, correlation and regression, planned and post-hoc comparisons, as well as various non-parametric tests. Research design is also explored.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor consent; Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 201

PSYC 201 required.

PSYC 201.01 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL06

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55348

Mija M Van Der Wege

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 200

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 201.02 Measurement and Data Analysis Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL06

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55347

Mija M Van Der Wege

This lab course accompanies the lecture course, Psychology 200, and must be taken during the same term. The lab will provide an opportunity to explore lecture topics more deeply, and in particular emphasize data collection and computational skills.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 200

PSYC 200 required.

PSYC 210.00 Psychology of Learning and Memory 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL35

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 55362

Julie J Neiworth

A summary of theoretical approaches, historical influences and contemporary research in the area of human and animal learning. The course provides a background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, and these are applied to issues such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, decision-making, education, and choice. It is recommended that students enroll concurrently in Psychology 211. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission

PSYC 211.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Learning and Memory 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings B12

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 55363

Julie J Neiworth

This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning and memory. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission

PSYC 210 required previously or concurrently.

PSYC 211.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Learning and Memory 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings B12

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 55364

Julie J Neiworth

This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning and memory. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission

PSYC 210 required previously or concurrently.

PSYC 211.03 Laboratory Research Methods in Learning and Memory 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Hulings B12

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 55365

Julie J Neiworth

This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning and memory. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission

PSYC 210 required previously or concurrently.

PSYC 257.01 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL53

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55367

Neil S Lutsky

Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 256 required.

PSYC 257.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Social Behavior and Interpersonal Processes 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Music & Drama Center LL53

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 55368

Neil S Lutsky

Students will participate in the planning and replication of empirical studies of the social psychology of social behavior. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 256. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 256 and 257 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 256 required.

Search for Courses

This data updates hourly. For up-to-the-minute enrollment information, use the Search for Classes option in The Hub

Class Period
Courses or labs meeting at non-standard times may not appear when searching by class period.
Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests