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Your search for courses for 21/FA and with code: CGSCELECTIVE found 12 courses.

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BIOL 365.00 Seminar: Topics in Neuroscience 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62069

Fernan Jaramillo

We will focus on recent advances in neuroscience. All areas of neuroscience (cellular/molecular, developmental, systems, cognitive, and disease) will be considered. Classical or foundational papers will be used to provide background.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

Waitlist only

CGSC 336.00 Moral Thinking, Reasoning, and Decision Making 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:35pm1:50pm3:35pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 60233

Kathleen M Galotti

In this seminar course we will examine how children, adolescents, and adults confront moral dilemmas, reason about ethical issues, and decide on a course of action when challenged by confounding questions. Topics include the development of moral reasoning, gender difference in moral reasoning, socio-cultural influences on moral reasoning, and how moral issues intersect with other realms of decision making. We will examine work by Lawrence Kohlberg, Carol Gilligan, Eliot Turiel, and Jonathan Haidt. As a seminar, the emphasis will be on discussion. Course requirements include regular attendance and participation, preparing and leading class discussions, short reaction/reflection papers, and a final paper. 

Prerequisite: Cognitive Science 130 or Cognitive Science 232, 236 or any 200-level course in Psychology or Instructor Consent

CS 321.00 Making Decisions with Artificial Intelligence 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 34, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61865

David R Musicant

There are many situations where computer systems must make intelligent choices, from selecting actions in a game, to suggesting ways to distribute scarce resources for monitoring endangered species, to a search-and-rescue robot learning to interact with its environment. Artificial intelligence offers multiple frameworks for solving these problems. While popular media attention has often emphasized supervised machine learning, this course instead engages with a variety of other approaches in artificial intelligence, both established and cutting edge. These include intelligent search strategies, game playing approaches, constrained decision making, reinforcement learning from experience, and more. Coursework includes problem solving and programming.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201. Additionally Computer Science 202 is strongly recommended.

ECON 267.00 Behavioral Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61315

Jonathan M Lafky

This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

EDUC 234.00 Educational Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62405

Deborah Appleman

Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students.

Extra Time required.

LING 217.00 Phonetics and Phonology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62053

Jenna T Conklin, Daniel K Haataja

Although no two utterances are ever exactly the same, we humans don't function like tape recorders; we overlook distinctions to which mechanical recording devices are sensitive, and we "hear" contrasts which are objectively not there. What we (think we) hear is determined by the sound system of the language we speak. This course examines the sound systems of human languages, focusing on how speech sounds are produced and perceived, and how these units come to be organized into a systematic network in the minds of speakers of languages.

Prerequisite: 100-level Linguistics course

LING 315.00 Topics in Syntax 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62054

Catherine R Fortin

More on syntax. Particular topics vary by year and student interest.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 216

NEUR 127.52 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 61917

Eric D Hoopfer

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

NEUR 127.53 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am2:00pm6:00pm10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61918

Eric D Hoopfer

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

PHIL 100.03 Science, Faith and Rationality 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61433

Jason A Decker

This seminar will introduce the student to the study of philosophy through a consideration of various epistemic and metaphysical issues surrounding science and religion. What distinguishes scientific inquiry from other areas of inquiry: Its subject matter, its method of inquiry, or perhaps both? How does scientific belief differ from religious belief, in particular? Is the scientist committed to substantive metaphysical assumptions? If so, what role do these assumptions play in scientific investigation and how do they differ from religious dogma (if they do)? Our exploration of these questions will involve the consideration of both classic and contemporary philosophical texts.

Held for new first year students

PSYC 238.00 Memory Processes 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61769

Mija M Van Der Wege

Memory is involved in nearly every human activity: We use our memory not only when we reminisce about the past, but when we study for our exams, talk to our friends, and tie our shoes. This course explores the psychological science of human memory. We will examine different types of memory, how we encode new memories and retrieve old ones, how to ensure a memory is never forgotten, and how to implant a false memory in someone else. In doing so we will look at both old and new research, and discuss how memory research can be applied to some real world environments, such as courtrooms and classrooms. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the field of memory research and be able to evaluate the quality of the studies used as evidence in these debates.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 239 not offered, will not complete LS

PSYC 250.00 Developmental Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61777

Kathleen M Galotti

An introduction to the concept of development, examining both theoretical models and empirical evidence. Prenatal through late childhood is covered with some discussion of adolescence when time permits. Topics include the development of personality and identity, social behavior and knowledge, and cognition. In addition, attention is paid to current applications of theory to such topics as: day care, the role of the media, and parenting.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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