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Your search for courses for 21/FA and with code: HISTANCNT/MDVL found 4 courses.

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CLAS 122.00 The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory: From the Beginning to the Classical Age 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62260

Alex R Knodell

"Never say that prehistory is not history." The late Fernand Braudel had it right. Over 99 percent of human history predates the written word, and this course examines one of the world's most diverse, yet unifying environments--the Mediterranean Sea--from the earliest populations around its shores to the emergence of the Classical world of the Greeks and Romans. Neanderthals and modern humans, the first artists and farmers, multiculturalism among Greeks, Phoenicians, Etruscans, and others... These are some of the topics to be covered as we study the precursors and roots of what would become "Western" civilization.

CLAS 229.00 Warlords and the Collapse of the Roman Republic 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62261

Jordan R Rogers

The class will investigate the factors that led a Republican government that had lasted for 700 years to fall apart, leading to twenty years of civil war that only ended with the rise of a totalitarian dictatorship. We will look at the economic, social, military, and religious factors that played key roles in this dynamic political period. We will also trace the rise and influence of Roman warlords, politicians, and personalities and how they changed Roman politics and society. We will study many of the greatest characters in Roman history, as well as the lives of everyday Romans in this turbulent time.

HIST 100.05 Migration and Mobility in the Medieval North 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61428

Austin P Mason

Why did barbarians invade? Traders trade? Pilgrims travel? Vikings raid? Medieval Europe is sometimes caricatured as a world of small villages and strong traditions that saw little change between the cultural high-water marks of Rome and the Renaissance. In fact, this was a period of dynamic innovation, during which Europeans met many familiar challenges—environmental change, religious and cultural conflict, social and political competition—by traveling or migrating to seek new opportunities. This course will examine mobility and migration in northern Europe, and students will be introduced to diverse methodological approaches to their study by exploring historical and literary sources, archaeological evidence and scientific techniques involving DNA and isotopic analyses.

Held for new first year students

HIST 332.00 Image Makers and Breakers in the Premodern World 6 credits

William L North

What roles do images play in premodern societies? What are these images thought to be and to do? Why, at particular moments, have certain groups attempted to do away with images either completely or in specific settings? How do images create and threaten communities and how is the management of the visual integrated with and shaped by other values, structures, and objectives? This course will examine these and related questions by looking in depth at image-making and veneration and their opponents in a range of case studies (from the medieval west, Byzantium, Muslim lands, and Protestant Europe) and by examining theoretical discussions of images, vision, and cognition from the fourth through sixteenth centuries. This course is discussion intensive and each student will develop a research project on a topic of their own design.

Prerequisite: Previous history course or instructor consent

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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