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Your search for courses for 21/FA and with code: POSI-GDS2 found 6 courses.

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ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61313

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 274.00 Labor Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61316

Faress F Bhuiyan

Why do some people choose to work and others do not? Why are some people paid higher wages than others? What are the economic benefits of education for the individual and for society? How do government policies, such as subsidized child care, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the income tax influence whether people work and the number of hours they choose to work? These are some of the questions examined in labor economics. This course will focus on the labor supply and human capital decisions of individuals and households.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 281.00 International Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61317

Michael T Hemesath

This course studies theories of the multi-faceted interaction between the balance of international payments and foreign exchange market and the general levels of domestic prices, employment and economic activity. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms in international payments, macroeconomic policies for internal and external balance, and international monetary systems.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

HIST 205.00 American Environmental History 6 credits

George H Vrtis

Environmental concerns, conflicts, and change mark the course of American history, from the distant colonial past to our own day. This course will consider the nature of these eco-cultural developments, focusing on the complicated ways that human thought and perception, culture and society, and natural processes and biota have all combined to forge Americans' changing relationship with the natural world. Topics will include Native American subsistence strategies, Euroamerican settlement, industrialization, urbanization, consumption, and the environmental movement. As we explore these issues, one of our overarching goals will be to develop an historical context for thinking deeply about contemporary environmental dilemmas.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62492

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 274.00 Globalization, Pandemics, and Human Security 6 credits

Tun Myint

What are the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic on global politics and public policy? How do state responses to COVID-19 as well as historical cases such as the Black Death in Europe, the SARS outbreak in East Asia and Middle East, and the Ebola outbreak in Africa help us understand the scientific, political, and economic challenges of pandemics on countries and communities around the world? We will apply theories and concepts from IR, political economy, and natural sciences to explore these questions and consider what we can learn from those responses to address other global challenges like climate change.

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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