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Your search for courses for 21/FA and with code: WGSTADDL found 16 courses.

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AFST 100.00 Gender and Sex in African History 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61436

Thabiti C Willis

This course looks at the ways that Africanist historians, art historians, anthropologists, and sociologists have examined gender and sexualities in selected cases on the African continent. Students will study the complexities of gender and sexual experiences, practices, identities, and communities within various historical and cultural contexts.

Held for new first year students

AMST 225.00 Beauty and Race in America 6 credits

Adriana Estill

In this class we consider the construction of American beauty historically, examining the way whiteness intersects with beauty to produce a dominant model that marginalizes women of color. We study how communities of color follow, refuse, or revise these beauty ideals through literature. We explore events like the beauty pageant, material culture such as cosmetics, places like the beauty salon, and body work like cosmetic surgery to understand how beauty is produced and negotiated.

ARTH 214.00 Queer Art 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61524

Ross K Elfline

Beyond surveying the rich history of arts by LGBTQA+ individuals, this course takes as its object of study the ways in which the arts have been used to question, undermine, and subvert the gendered and sexual norms of dominant cultures—in short, to queer them. In so doing, such visual and performative practices offer new, alternative models of living and acting in the world based on liberatory politics and aesthetics. This course will consider topics such as: censorship of queer artists; art of the AIDS crisis; activist performance; the sexual politics of public space; and queer intersections of race, class and gender in visual art among others.

Prerequisite: Any one art history course

Extra Time Required

DANC 266.00 Reading The Dancing Body 6 credits

Judith A Howard

Dance is a field in which bodies articulate a history of sexuality, nation, gender, and race. In this course, the investigation of the body as a “text” will be anchored by intersectional and feminist perspectives. We will re-center American concert dance history, emphasizing the Africanist base of American Dance performance, contemporary black choreographers, and Native American concert dance. Through reading, writing, discussing, moving, viewing videos and performances the class will “read” the gender, race, and politics of the dancing body in the cultural/historical context of Modern, Post Modern and Contemporary Dance.

ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61313

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ENGL 217.00 A Novel Education 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Laird 206

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62211

Jessica L Leiman

Samuel Johnson declared novels to be “written chiefly to the young, the ignorant, and the idle, to whom they serve as lectures of conduct, and introductions into life.” This course explores what sort of education the novel offered its readers during a time when fiction was considered a source of valuable lessons and also an agent of corruption. We will read a selection of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century children’s literature, seduction fiction, and novels of manners, considering how these works engage with early educational theories, notions of male and female conduct, and concerns about the didactic and sensational possibilities of fiction. Authors include Samuel Richardson, Jane Austen, Maria Edgeworth, and Charles Dickens.

GWSS 110.00 Introduction to Gender, Women's & Sexuality Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62650

Jayne A Swift

This course is an introduction to the ways in which gender and sexuality structure our world, and to the ways feminists challenge established intellectual frameworks. However, since gender and sexuality are not homogeneous categories, but are crosscut by class, race, ethnicity, citizenship and culture, we also consider the ways differences in social location intersect with gender and sexuality.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GWSS 110.WL0 (Synonym 62651)

GWSS 150.00 Working Sex: Commercial Sexual Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61375

Jayne A Swift

Why is the sale of sex criminalized? Who participates in sexual labor and for what reasons? What are the goals and tactics of sex worker social movements? Sexual commerce is an integral facet of U.S. society and the global economy, and yet it elicits strong and paradoxical reactions. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of commercial sexual cultures. Taking a transnational approach, we will examine historical, political, and economic changes in sexual economies and the regulation of commercial sex. Course readings explore how sex workers have collectively organized to resist criminalization and fight for a better future.

GWSS 243.07 Women's and Gender Studies in Europe Program: Situated Feminisms: Socio-Political Systems and Gender Issues Across Europe 7-8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 62625

Iveta Jusová

This course examines the history and present of feminist and LGBTQ activisms across Western and East-Central Europe. We study the impact of the European colonial heritage on the lives of women and sexual/ethnic minorities across European communities, as well as the legacies of World War II, the Cold War, and the EU expansion into Eastern Europe. Reproductive rights, LGBTQ issues, “anti-genderism,” sex work, trafficking, and issues faced by ethnic minorities are among topics explored. These topics are addressed comparatively and historically, stressing their ‘situated’ nature and considering their divergent sociopolitical national frameworks.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 244.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Cross-Cultural Feminist Methodologies 7-8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 62626

Iveta Jusová

This course explores the following questions: What is the relationship between methodology and knowledge claims in feminist research? How do language and narrative help shape experience? What are the power interests involved in keeping certain knowledges marginalized/subjugated? How do questions of gender and sexuality, of ethnicity and national location, figure in these debates? We will also pay close attention to questions arising from the hegemony of English as the global language of WGS as a discipline, and will reflect on what it means to move between different linguistic communities, with each being differently situated in the global power hierarchies.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 325.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Continental Feminist, Queer, Trans* Theories 7-8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 62627

Iveta Jusová

Addressing the impact of Anglo-American influences in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, this course examines European, including East-Central European, approaches to key gender and sexuality topics. It raises questions about the transfer of feminist concepts across cultures and languages. Some of the themes explored include nationalism and gender/sexuality, gendered dimensions of Western and East-Central European racisms, the historical influence of psychoanalysis on Continental feminist theories, the implications of European feminisms in the history of colonialism, the biopolitics of gender, homonationalism, as well as Eastern European socialist/communist theories of women’s emancipation.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to WGST Europe OCS Program

OCS GEP GWSS Program

HIST 218.00 Black Women's History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61364

Noël Voltz

This course focuses on the history of black women in the United States. The class will offer an overview of the lived experiences of women of African descent in this country from enslavement to the present.  We will focus on themes of labor, reproduction, health, community, family, resistance, activism, etc., highlighting the diversity of black women’s experiences and the ways in which their lives have been shaped by the intersections of their race, gender, sexuality, and class.

POSC 280.00 Feminist Security Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62494

Summer N Forester

Feminist security studies question and challenge traditional approaches to international relations and security, highlighting the myriad ways that state security practices can actually increase insecurity for many people. How and why does this security paradox exist and how do we escape it? In this class, we will explore the theoretical and analytical contributions of feminist security scholars and use these lessons to analyze a variety of policies, issues, and conflicts. The cases that we will cover include the UN resolution on women, peace, and security, Sweden’s feminist foreign policy, violence against women, and conflicts in Syria, Uganda, and Yemen.

RELG 227.00 Liberation Theologies 6 credits

Lori K Pearson

Is God on the side of the poor? This course explores how liberation theologians have called for justice, social change, and resistance by drawing on fundamental sources in Christian tradition and by using economic and political theories to address poverty, racism, oppression, gender injustice, and more. We explore the principles of liberationist thought, including black theology, Latin American liberation theology, and feminist theology through writings of various contemporary thinkers. We also examine the social settings out of which these thinkers have emerged, their critiques of “traditional” theologies, and the new vision of community they have developed in various contexts.

SOAN 225.00 Social Movements 6 credits

Meera Sehgal

How is it that in specific historical moments ordinary people come together and undertake collective struggles for justice in social movements such as Black Lives Matter, Me Too, Standing Rock, immigrant, and LGBTQ rights? How have these movements theorized oppression, and what has been their vision for liberation? What collective change strategies have they proposed and what obstacles have they faced? We will explore specific case studies and use major sociological perspectives theorizing the emergence of movements, repertoires of protest, collective identity formation, frame alignment, and resource mobilization. We will foreground the intersectionality of gender, sexuality, race, and class in these movements.

THEA 260.00 Space, Time, Body, Minds 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61824

Lizbett J Benge

What is a body? What can bodies do? These questions guide our journey into the elements of space/time/body/mind as anchor points to explore contemporary performance art. We will engage feminist technoscience studies, geographies of space and place, trauma-informed care practices, intersectional women of color feminisms, and art as activism to deepen our evolving understandings of spacetimebodyminds. Students will develop performance solos in their chosen artistic mediums that take up and respond to bodies as theoretical, material, concrete, and abstract. The course is open to all students, regardless of experience level, with an interest in: movement, performance, art, community building, feminist theory, and collective creation. Assignments will include a mix of viewings, creative response sheets, journal prompts, embodied exercises, and a research-based photo essay.

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