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Your search for courses for 21/FA and with Overlay: IS found 80 courses.

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AFST 100.00 Gender and Sex in African History 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61436

Thabiti C Willis

This course looks at the ways that Africanist historians, art historians, anthropologists, and sociologists have examined gender and sexualities in selected cases on the African continent. Students will study the complexities of gender and sexual experiences, practices, identities, and communities within various historical and cultural contexts.

Held for new first year students

ARBC 100.00 Arabs Encountering the West 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61430

Zaki A Haidar

The encounter between Arabs and Westerners has been marked by its fair share of sorrow and suspicion. In this seminar we will read literary works by Arab authors written over approximately 1000 years--from the Crusades, the height of European imperialism, and on into the age of Iraq, Obama and ISIS. Through our readings and discussions, we will ask along with Arab authors: Is conflict between Arabs and Westerners the inevitable and unbridgeable result of differing world-views, religions and cultures? Are differences just a result of poor communication? Or is this "cultural conflict" something that can be understood historically?

Held for new first year students

ARTH 100.00 Witches, Monsters and Demons 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 140

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61260

Jessica F Keating

Between 1300 and 1600 depictions of witches, monsters, and demons moved from the margins of medieval manuscripts and the nooks of church architecture to the center of altarpieces and heart of princely collections. Although this diabolical imagery was extremely diverse, it came from one place: the mind of the Renaissance artist. This course examines how images that came from within were devised and fashioned into works of art. It considers why fantastical imagery that showcased the artist’s imagination was so highly valued during the Renaissance--a period typically associated with the rebirth of classical antiquity. Finally, it explores the connection between illusions, visions, dreams, and other visual phenomena that highlighted the potential malfunction of the mind, and artistic creation. Some of the artists discussed include, but are not limited to, Hieronymous Bosch, Michelangelo, and Leonardo da Vinci

Held for new first year students

ARTH 215.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology in Prague: Czech Art and Architecture 4 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60181

Ken B Abrams

This course will examine key developments in Czech visual art and architecture from the early medieval to the contemporary periods. Slide-based lectures will be supplemented by visits to representative monuments, art collections, and museums in Prague.

OCS Cross Cultural Psychology in Prague

ARTH 230.00 Princesses as Patrons circa 1500 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61525

Martha A Wolff

Three remarkable royal women (Queen Isabel of Castile, Anne of France, and Archduchess Margaret of Austria, regent of the Netherlands), linked by blood, marriage, and shifting dynastic alliances, provide a lens to examine patronage networks and collecting culture in France, Spain and the Netherlands circa 1500, at the transition from the late middle ages to the Renaissance. Isabel of Castile was exceptional as a sovereign queen; for most royal women power was indirect, delegated, and carefully masked, while the requirement to produce an heir was paramount. The course will consider the interplay of these constraints and the works of art these princesses commissioned and lived with by looking at topics like palace design, inventories of royal collections and the hierarchies of luxury arts they reveal, portraiture as an expression of dynastic piety and marriage politics, and the new prominence of painting as an independent and collectable medium.

Prerequisite: Any one art history course

Extra Time Required

ARTH 232.07 Madrid Program: Spanish Art Live 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60176

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

This course offers an introduction to Spanish art from el Greco to the present. Classes are taught in some of the finest museums and churches of Spain, including the Prado Museum, the Museo Nacional de Arte Reina Sofía, the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum, Toledo Cathedral in Toledo, and the Church of Santo Tomé.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205

OCS Madrid Program

ARTH 246.00 What Has Been Happening in Modern Architectural Design? 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61526

David T Van Zanten

Architecture in our culture has become the art of solving spatial problems with large-scale constructions, at first in drawings but now as patterns on computer screens. This course examines four aspects of this Western building conceptualization during the last two hundred years, beginning with the exploration of it as the art of building and ending in coding--in our digital world today. We will focus on four fundamental moments in this historical development: 1) the emergence of the architect as a new exploring, reasoning figure in European culture in the early nineteenth-century (Labrouste, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc); 2) transforming into a broad conceiver of whole cities facing the demands of the late-nineteenth century urban “explosion” (Haussmann, Burnham); 3) but rapidly progressing to the abstraction of “building art,” a web of machine-like systems during the first half of the twentieth century (F. L. Wright, Le Corbusier, Hilberseimer); 4) to now sink—with struggles and false-starts—into our new computerized world.

Prerequisite: Any one art history course

Extra Time Required

ARTH 266.00 Arts of the Japanese Tea Ceremony 6 credits

Closed: Size: 14, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61527

Kathleen M Ryor

This course will examine the history and aesthetics of the tea ceremony in Japan (chanoyu).  It will focus on the types of objects produced for use in the Japanese tea ceremony from the fifteenth century through the present. Themes to be explored include: the relationship of social status and politics to the development of chanoyu; the religious dimensions of the tea ceremony; gender roles of tea practitioners; nationalist appropriation of the tea ceremony and its relationship to the mingei movement in the twentieth century; and the international promotion of the Japanese tea ceremony post-WWII.

Prerequisite: Requires concurrent registration in Studio Arts 236

Extra Time Required, requires concurrent registration in ARTS 236

ASST 100.00 The Cultural Life of Plants in China 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61261

Kathleen M Ryor

This seminar will examine the role of plants have played in China from ancient times through the end of the imperial era. It will investigate the uses of different types of plants (fruits, vegetables, flowers, grasses, etc.) in such areas as medicine, food, literature, art, and landscape management. We will seek to understand the ways in which plants function across and make connection between various aspects of human activities. In addition, the course will emphasize how plants have actively helped form Chinese cultural practices and systems of meaning throughout various historical periods.

Held for new first year students

ASST 135.00 Exploring India: Orientation/Orientalism 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61938

Meera Sehgal

Images of India are ever-present in American media and pop culture. The land of Gandhi, call-centers, a multitude of religious faiths, the Taj Mahal, oppressed women, vast poverty and wealth. Come and learn about India, a region of immense contrasts and diversities, home to more than one billion people. We will explore Indian history and geography, cuisine and traditions, people and their languages, art, architecture and music, while being introduced to the Hindi and Urdu languages. Our class materials will include scholarly writings, guest speakers, popular cinema, documentary films, poetry, music, and food.

ASST 319.07 Buddhist Studies India Program: History of South Asian Buddhism 8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61943

Arthur P McKeown

This course provides students with an introduction to the history of South Asian Buddhism. Using primary and secondary sources and resources available to us in Bodh Gaya, we evaluate competing perspectives on the history of Buddhism and debate significant historical and ethical questions. How did Buddhism relate to other ancient Indian religions? What was the relationship between Buddhism and ancient Indian political, social, and economic structures? How did Buddhism change during its 2000 years in India? What impact did South Asian Buddhism have on the ancient and medieval world? What is the relationship between modern Buddhism and ancient Buddhism?

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Buddhist Studies India Program required

OCP GEP Buddhist Studies India

CAMS 210.00 Film History I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61963

Dimitrios Pavlounis

This course surveys the first half-century of cinema history, focusing on film structure and style as well as transformations in technology, industry and society. Topics include series photography, the nickelodeon boom, local movie-going, Italian super-spectacles, early African American cinema, women film pioneers, abstraction and surrealism, German Expressionism, Soviet silent cinema, Chaplin and Keaton, the advent of sound and color technologies, the Production Code, the American Studio System, Britain and early Hitchcock, Popular Front cinema in France, and early Japanese cinema. Assignments aim to develop skills in close analysis and working with primary sources in researching and writing film history.

Extra Time Evening Screenings

CCST 100.00 Growing up Cross-Culturally 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61417

Stephanie M Cox

First-year students interested in this program should enroll in this seminar. The course is recommended but not required for the minor and it will count as one of the electives. From cradle to grave, cultural assumptions shape our own sense of who we are. This course is designed to enable American and international students to compare how their own and other societies view birth, infancy, adolescence, marriage, adulthood, and old age. Using children's books, child-rearing manuals, movies, and ethnographies, we will explore some of the assumptions in different parts of the globe about what it means to "grow up."

Held for new first year students

CCST 100.02 Cross Cultural Perspectives on Israeli and Palestinian Identity 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61416

Stacy N Beckwith

How have Jewish and Palestinian citizens of Israel shaped their senses of personal and collective identity since the early twentieth century? We will explore mental pictures of the land, one's self, and others in a selection of Israeli Jewish and Palestinian short stories, novels, and films. We will also explore some of the humanistic roots of U.S. involvement in Israeli-Palestinian relations today, particularly in the realm of American initiated bi-cultural youth camps such as Seeds of Peace. Students will enrich our class focus by introducing us to perspectives on Israel/Palestine in their home countries or elsewhere. In translation.

Held for new first year students

CCST 208.00 International Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Recreation Center 226

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:15pm
Synonym: 61944

Luciano H Battaglini

Have you just returned from Asia, Africa, Europe, or South America? This course is an excellent way to keep in touch with the culture (and, when appropriate, the language) you left behind. Relying on magazines and newspapers around the world, students will discuss common topics and themes representing a wide array of regions. You may choose to read the press in the local language, or read English-language media about your region, meeting once each week for conversational exchange. (Language of conversation is English.)

Prerequisite: Students must have participated in an off-campus study program (Carleton or non-Carleton) or instructor permission

CLAS 229.00 Warlords and the Collapse of the Roman Republic 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62261

Jordan R Rogers

The class will investigate the factors that led a Republican government that had lasted for 700 years to fall apart, leading to twenty years of civil war that only ended with the rise of a totalitarian dictatorship. We will look at the economic, social, military, and religious factors that played key roles in this dynamic political period. We will also trace the rise and influence of Roman warlords, politicians, and personalities and how they changed Roman politics and society. We will study many of the greatest characters in Roman history, as well as the lives of everyday Romans in this turbulent time.

ECON 100.00 Revolution and Reform in Chinese Agriculture 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61369

Denise M Hare

China’s incredible economic transformation and growth trajectory started simply, by most accounts, with a few carefully chosen modifications to the incentive structure faced by farmers. The move away from collective farming is credited with unleashing productivity forces well beyond initial expectations and paving the way for a continuing series of market-oriented reforms, first in the rural and later in the urban sector. What is less well known, however, is that China also experienced a short-lived farm production boost in an earlier era, shortly after formation of the People’s Republic of China. In contrast to the decentralization moves in the 1980s, rather the 1950s was characterized by gradual introduction of collective resource ownership and management, ultimately leading to commune style farming. We will draw from a variety of analytical sources, including economics, sociology, political science, anthropology, and history, to understand how China transformed itself twice, in opposite directions, exploring the impetuses behind these changes, their impacts, and their legacies.

Held for incoming first year students

ECON 243.00 Market Development and Policy Reform in China 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61289

Denise M Hare

In the course of a few decades, China has launched itself from a poor country to a rising world power, at the same time substantially improving living standards and dramatically transforming its production base. What steps did China take to bring about these changes? We will examine China’s domestic economic reforms and development, considering the goals and impacts of various policy measures, along with on-going challenges. Topics to be considered include population, labor, income inequality, land, food production, industry, foreign relations, credit and financial markets, and the environment. While China will be our central focus, students will have some opportunities to compare and contrast with other country experiences.

Prerequisite: Eonomics 110 and 111

ECON 395.02 Advanced Topics in Economic Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61321

Faress F Bhuiyan

Students will be exposed to theoretical models of economic development both from a micro and a macro perspective. Econometric models including probits, logits, instrumental variables, ordered probits, and ordered logits will be applied to micro-level data to study theoretical models dealing with migration, poverty, inequality, nutrition, development program evaluation, and decision making in the context of developing countries. Economic development will also be explored from the perspective of the "growth literature" where macro level panel data will be explored using fixed-effects and random-effects panel regression models.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330, and 331, or instructor permission

ENGL 252.00 Caribbean Fiction 6 credits

Arnab Chakladar

This course will examine Anglophone fiction in the Caribbean from the late colonial period through our contemporary moment. We will examine major developments in form and language as well as the writing of identity, personal and (trans)national. We will read works by canonical writers such as V.S Naipaul, George Lamming and Jamaica Kincaid, as well as by lesser known contemporary writers.

EUST 100.00 Allies or Enemies? America through European Eyes 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61435

Paul Petzschmann

During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, America often served as a canvass for projecting European anxieties about economic, social and political modernization. Admiration of technological progress and political stability was combined with a pervasive anti-Americanism, which was, according to political scientist Andrei Markovits, the "lingua franca" of modern Europe. These often contradictory perceptions of the United States were crucial in the process of forming national histories and mythologies as well as a common European identity. Accordingly, this course will explore the many and often contradictory views expressed by Europe's emerging mass publics and intellectual and political elites about the United States during this period.

Held for new first year students

EUST 278.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology Sem in Prague: Politics & Culture in Central Europe-Twentieth Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60178

Ken B Abrams

This course covers important political, social, and cultural developments in Central Europe during the twentieth century. Studies will explore the establishment of independent nations during the interwar period, Nazi occupation, resistance and collaboration, the Holocaust and the expulsion of the Germans, the nature of the communist system, its final collapse, and the post-communist transformation.

FREN 100.00 Balloons and Cultures: Graphic Novels of the French Speaking World 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61424

Sandra E Rousseau

Can everyone read graphic novels? Of course; however, their accessibility doesn't mean they are simple. In this course, students will learn to read graphic novels as cultural products generated by artists, places, and institutions. Coming from French-speaking countries in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, these texts argue for different (and sometimes contradictory) definitions of the genre; but also bring to the fore political and societal issues at stake in the francophone world. Using the tools of contemporary theory, students will draw connections between art and cultural representations. Conducted in English. Texts in translation.

Held for new first year students

FREN 210.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 335

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 60459

Chérif Keïta

Keep up your French while learning about current issues in France, as well as world issues from a French perspective. Class meets once a week for an hour. Requirements include reading specific sections of leading French newspapers, (Le Monde, Libération, etc.) on the internet, and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students.

Prerequisite: French 204 or instructor approval

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: FREN 210.WL0 (Synonym 60460)

FREN 257.00 French and Francophone Autofiction 6 credits

Open: Size: 0, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62634

Cathy Yandell

How to transcribe the self? How is a self created, examined, or reinvented through storytelling? Is cultural context inextricable from self-writing? Our inquiry will be informed by readings from Montaigne, Descartes, Maryse Condé, and the controversial contemporary author Édouard Louis; a film by Agnès Varda; an autofictional graphic novel; and songs by the Franco-Rwandan singer Gaël Faye. During the course of the term, students will also produce their own autobiographical/autofictional projects. Offered at both the 200 and 300 levels, and coursework will be adjusted accordingly.

Prerequisite: French 204 or the equivalent

Cross-listed with FREN 357

FREN 308.00 France and the African Imagination 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 243

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60185

Chérif Keïta

This course will look at the presence of France and its capital Paris in the imaginary landscape of a number of prominent African writers, filmmakers and musicians such as Bernard Dadié (Côte d' Ivoire), Ousmane Sembène (Senegal), Calixthe Beyala (Cameroun), Alain Mabanckou (Congo-Brazzaville), Salif Keïta (Mali) and others. The history of Franco-African relations will be used as a background for our analysis of these works. Conducted in French. This course is part of the OCS winter break French Program in Senegal, involving two linked courses in fall and winter terms. This courses is the first in the sequence, students must register for French 246 winter term.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 and acceptance in OCS Winter Break French Program in Senegal

OCS Winter Break French Program

FREN 357.00 French and Francophone Autofiction 6 credits

Open: Size: 0, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

CMC 319

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62267

Cathy Yandell

How to transcribe the self? How is a self created, examined, or reinvented through storytelling? Is cultural context inextricable from self-writing? Our inquiry will be informed by readings from Montaigne, Descartes, Maryse Condé, and the controversial contemporary author Édouard Louis; a film by Agnès Varda; an autofictional graphic novel; and songs by the Franco-Rwandan singer Gaël Faye. During the course of the term, students will also produce their own autobiographical/ autofictional projects. Offered at both the 200 and 300 levels, coursework will be adjusted accordingly.

Prerequisite: One French course beyond French 204 or instructor permission

GERM 247.00 Mirror, Mirror: Reflecting on Fairy Tales and Folklore 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

CMC 304

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62277

Kiley Kost

Many people are familiar with the fairy tales collected and published by the Brothers Grimm and have seen iterations of such stories in animated Disney films and live-action reboots. In this class, taught in English, we will critically examine folktales, consider their role in shaping societal standards and how they spread specific values across cultures. We will study the origins of Grimms’ fairy tales before discussing their larger role across media and cultures. Our study of traditional German fairy tales will be informed by contemporary theoretical approaches including feminist theory, ecocriticism, psychology, and animal studies.

In Translation

GWSS 243.07 Women's and Gender Studies in Europe Program: Situated Feminisms: Socio-Political Systems and Gender Issues Across Europe 7-8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 62625

Iveta Jusová

This course examines the history and present of feminist and LGBTQ activisms across Western and East-Central Europe. We study the impact of the European colonial heritage on the lives of women and sexual/ethnic minorities across European communities, as well as the legacies of World War II, the Cold War, and the EU expansion into Eastern Europe. Reproductive rights, LGBTQ issues, “anti-genderism,” sex work, trafficking, and issues faced by ethnic minorities are among topics explored. These topics are addressed comparatively and historically, stressing their ‘situated’ nature and considering their divergent sociopolitical national frameworks.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 244.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Cross-Cultural Feminist Methodologies 7-8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 62626

Iveta Jusová

This course explores the following questions: What is the relationship between methodology and knowledge claims in feminist research? How do language and narrative help shape experience? What are the power interests involved in keeping certain knowledges marginalized/subjugated? How do questions of gender and sexuality, of ethnicity and national location, figure in these debates? We will also pay close attention to questions arising from the hegemony of English as the global language of WGS as a discipline, and will reflect on what it means to move between different linguistic communities, with each being differently situated in the global power hierarchies.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the WGST Europe OCS Program required

OCS GEP GWSS Program in Europe

GWSS 325.07 Women's & Gender Studies in Europe Program: Continental Feminist, Queer, Trans* Theories 7-8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 62627

Iveta Jusová

Addressing the impact of Anglo-American influences in Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, this course examines European, including East-Central European, approaches to key gender and sexuality topics. It raises questions about the transfer of feminist concepts across cultures and languages. Some of the themes explored include nationalism and gender/sexuality, gendered dimensions of Western and East-Central European racisms, the historical influence of psychoanalysis on Continental feminist theories, the implications of European feminisms in the history of colonialism, the biopolitics of gender, homonationalism, as well as Eastern European socialist/communist theories of women’s emancipation.

Prerequisite: Acceptance to WGST Europe OCS Program

OCS GEP GWSS Program

HIST 100.02 Beloved or Dangerous: Cities in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61293

Jennifer L Schaefer

Beloved or dangerous. Ordered or chaotic. Modern or backward. What motivated these conflicting descriptions of Latin American cities? Why were cities like Buenos Aires, Havana, Mexico City, and Rio de Janeiro so important as places of political and economic power? How were these cities sites of cultural exchange for immigrant, Afro-Latin American, and Indigenous communities? In this course, we will answer these questions by exploring the histories of Latin America cities from the colonial period to the present. We will consider how urban spaces shaped people’s identities and daily lives and how these cities became places of national and global influence.

Held for incoming first year students

HIST 100.03 Confucius and His Critics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 202

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61426

Seungjoo Yoon

An introduction to the study of historical biography. Instead of what we heard or think about Confucius, we will examine what his contemporaries, both his supporters and critics, thought he was. Students will scrutinize various sources gleaned from archaeology, heroic narratives, and court debates, as well as the Analects to write their own biography of Confucius based on a particular historical context that created a persistent constitutional agenda in early China. Students will justify why they would call such a finding, in hindsight, "Confucian" in its formative days. Themes can be drawn from aspects of ritual, bureaucracy, speech and writing

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.04 Exploration, Science, and Empire 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61427

Antony E Adler

This course provides an introduction to the global history of exploration. We will examine the scientific and artistic aspects of expeditions, and consider how scientific knowledge--navigation, medicinal treatments, or the collection of scientific specimens--helped make exploration, and subsequently Western colonialism, possible. We will also explore how the visual and literary representations of exotic places shaped distant audiences’ understandings of empire and of the so-called races of the world. Art and science helped form the politics of Western nationalism and expansion; this course will explore some of the ways in which their legacy remains with us today.

Held for new first year students

HIST 100.05 Migration and Mobility in the Medieval North 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 301

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61428

Austin P Mason

Why did barbarians invade? Traders trade? Pilgrims travel? Vikings raid? Medieval Europe is sometimes caricatured as a world of small villages and strong traditions that saw little change between the cultural high-water marks of Rome and the Renaissance. In fact, this was a period of dynamic innovation, during which Europeans met many familiar challenges—environmental change, religious and cultural conflict, social and political competition—by traveling or migrating to seek new opportunities. This course will examine mobility and migration in northern Europe, and students will be introduced to diverse methodological approaches to their study by exploring historical and literary sources, archaeological evidence and scientific techniques involving DNA and isotopic analyses.

Held for new first year students

HIST 157.00 Health and Medicine in Japan 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61846

Seungjoo Yoon

How do Shintoism view childbirth and death? How do Buddhism and biotechnology intersect in the making of Japan? How do Japanese perceptions about health and medicine evolve with settler colonialism? This course examines the meaning of body, health, and medicine in Japan’s recent past when biomedicine came to replace classical Chinese medicine and to gradually occupy a hegemonic position in its pharmaceutical regime. Reading materials are drawn from illustrations, travelogues, and poems, as well as medical journals and reports. Themes include body and modern self, family and reproductive justice, medical colonialism, hygienic modernity, narcotics and ethnopsychology, and national healthcare system.

HIST 170.00 Modern Latin America 1810-Present 6 credits

Jennifer L Schaefer

Modern Latin American history is marked by both violent divisions and creative cooperation, nationalist proclamations and imperialist incursions, and democratic pursuits and dictatorial repression. This course offers a survey of this complex regional history from independence movements at the beginning of the nineteenth century through globalization in the twenty-first century. It addresses methodological issues that include the significance of multiple historical perspectives and the interpretation of sources. It considers the relationship between individuals and larger social contexts with an emphasis on race, ethnicity, class, citizenship status, and gender. It places Latin American culture and politics in regional and global contexts. 

HIST 181.00 West Africa in the Era of the Slave Trade 6 credits

Thabiti C Willis

The medieval Islamic and the European (or Atlantic) slave trades have had a tremendous influence on the history of Africa and the African Diaspora. This course offers an introduction to the history of West African peoples via their involvement in both of these trades from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century. More specifically, students will explore the demography, the economics, the social structure, and the ideologies of slavery. They also will learn the repercussions of these trades for men's and women's lives, for the expansion of coastal and hinterland kingdoms, and for the development of religious practices and networks.

HIST 232.00 Renaissance Worlds in France and Italy 6 credits

Victoria Morse

Enthusiasm, artistry, invention, exploration.... How do these notions of Renaissance culture play out in sources from the period? Using a range of evidence (historical, literary, and visual) from Italy and France in the fourteenth-sixteenth centuries we will explore selected issues of the period, including debates about the meaning of being human and ideal forms of government and education; the nature of God and mankind's duties toward the divine; the family and gender roles; definitions of beauty and the goals of artistic achievement; accumulation of wealth; and exploration of new worlds and encounters with other peoples.

HIST 239.00 Hunger, Public Policy and Food Provision in History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62444

Susannah R Ottaway

For the first four weeks, the course covers the comparative history of famine, and will be led by internationally renowned economic historian Cormac O’Grada, the 2020 Ott Family Lecturer in Economic History at Carleton College.  We examine causes and consequences (political, economic, demographic) and the historical memories of famines as well as case studies from Imperial Britain, Bengal and Ireland. In the second half of term, the course broadens its focus to examine the persistence of hunger and the nature of public policies related to food provision in comparative historical contexts.

HIST 241.00 Russia through Wars and Revolutions 6 credits

Adeeb Khalid

The lands of the Russian empire underwent massive transformations in the tumultuous decades that separated the accession of Nicholas II (1894) from the death of Stalin (1953). This course will explore many of these changes, with special attention paid to the social and political impact of wars (the Russo-Japanese War, World War I, the Civil War, and the Great Patriotic War) and revolutions (of 1905 and 1917), the ideological conflicts they engendered, and the comparative historical context in which they transpired.

HIST 332.00 Image Makers and Breakers in the Premodern World 6 credits

William L North

What roles do images play in premodern societies? What are these images thought to be and to do? Why, at particular moments, have certain groups attempted to do away with images either completely or in specific settings? How do images create and threaten communities and how is the management of the visual integrated with and shaped by other values, structures, and objectives? This course will examine these and related questions by looking in depth at image-making and veneration and their opponents in a range of case studies (from the medieval west, Byzantium, Muslim lands, and Protestant Europe) and by examining theoretical discussions of images, vision, and cognition from the fourth through sixteenth centuries. This course is discussion intensive and each student will develop a research project on a topic of their own design.

Prerequisite: Previous history course or instructor consent

HIST 347.00 The Global Cold War 6 credits

David G Tompkins

In the aftermath of the Second World War and through the 1980s, the United States and the Soviet Union competed for world dominance. This Cold War spawned hot wars, as well as a cultural and economic struggle for influence all over the globe. This course will look at the experience of the Cold War from the perspective of its two main adversaries, the U.S. and USSR, but will also devote considerable attention to South America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Students will write a 20 page paper based on original research.

JAPN 248.00 Modern Japanese Literature: A Survey on Modern Japanese Aesthetics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61301

Chie Tokuyama

This course offers an introduction to modern theories of art, with an emphasis on the origin of modern Japanese literature (1868-1945) and its newly cultivated aesthetic sensibilities. What are the defining characteristics of literature and what are its values in society? How is our aesthetic taste for beauty determined? The course surveys the field of modern Japanese literature, exploring the newly instituted notion of “literature” and the lofty role its pursuit of “beauty” played, as writers insisted, in enlightening the modern denizens living the age of uncertainty. Topics of inquires include how the shift in aesthetic taste for beauty correlated with the change in human relation to the natural world, and what moral implication it entailed. We explore answers to these questions by close-reading various cultural texts. Other readings will range historically and cross-culturally from premodern indigenous discourse on beauty to the nineteenth century Western aesthetic

JAPN 343.00 Advanced Japanese: Human-Nonhuman Relationship in Japanese Popular Media 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 202

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61304

Chie Tokuyama

This course explores Japanese popular media from an environmental perspective. The course incorporates prose, live-action films, and animation produced from 1868 through the present and attends to political, cultural, and philosophical events that ran parallel to developments and changes in the human relationship with the non-human world. By close-reading cultural texts produced in different eras, we will explore what options were available for rebuilding a sustainable environment in modern and contemporary Japan. Themes of exploration include modernization, internal colonization, gender, and industrial disaster, while familiarizing ourselves with an array of canonical authors and issues of global relevance. Students will develop skills in comprehending diverse cultural materials and outputting their integrated knowledge through in-class discussion and written assignments.

Prerequisite: Japanese 206 or equivalent

LING 232.00 Structure and History of German 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 60550

Jenna T Conklin

Why does German sometimes put the verb second and sometimes at the end, and how did this strange arrangement emerge? What differentiates the Scandinavian languages from Germanic tongues from more central latitudes? How did Germans come to say Apfel, while English and Dutch speakers say apple/appel? This course will explore these and similar questions, providing a linguistic overview of the German language and investigating key historical developments in the Germanic language family. Key topics will include dialectal variation, historical sound change, and syntactic structure, with primary focus on German and some attention to the Germanic language family as a whole.

Prerequisite: Either previous or concurrent enrollment in any Carleton Linguistics courses or knowledge of German or another Germanic language (not English). Concurrent enrollment in German 101 or higher statisfies the knowledge of German requirement

MUSC 140.00 Ethnomusicology and the World's Music 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61515

Sarah N Lahasky

This course is designed to increase your awareness of the role of music as a part of social, political, and economic life. While popular music consumption for entertainment is one interaction that you might have had with music, there are myriad other meanings and uses for music in the United States and around the world. Some of these uses and meanings are obviously apparent to the average listener, and others are less so. Throughout the course, we will be exploring a variety of ways that people use, engage, and identify with music from various regions. The course is organized geographically, beginning with the US/Western Europe and then moving to parts of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Each week, we will focus on particular themes related to “traditional,” classical, or popular music to analyze in the context of our geographic case studies. Throughout the course, you will have the opportunity to apply concepts from class to your own musical case study. The culminating course project will consist of an ethnography of your chosen case study. No musical experience necessary.

Sophomore Priority

MUSC 188.00 Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M027

MTWTHF
4:30pm6:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 60817

Gao Hong

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and a Chinese approach to musical training in order to learn and perform music from China. In addition to the Wednesday meeting time, there will be one sectional rehearsal each week.

Prerequisite: Previous experience in a music ensemble, Chinese Musical instruments or instructor permission

MUSC 192.00 West African Drum Ensemble 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 0, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center M027

MTWTHF
5:30pm6:30pm
Synonym: 60820

Jay L Johnson

The ensemble will use indigenous instruments and an African approach to musical training in order to learn and perform rhythms and songs from West Africa.

Prerequisite: Music 199 and/or instructor permission

PHIL 113.00 The Individual and the Political Community 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62183

Allison E Murphy

Are human beings radically individual and atomic by nature, political animals, or something else? However we answer that question, what difference does it make for our understanding of the ways in which larger political communities come into existence and are maintained? In this course we will explore these and related questions while reading two of the most foundational works in political theory, Plato’s Republic and Hobbes’s Leviathan, as well as several contemporary pieces influenced by these thinkers.

PHIL 213.00 Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62184

Daniel M Groll

How should we live? This is the fundamental question for the study of ethics. This course looks at classic and contemporary answers to the fundamental question from Socrates to Kant to modern day thinkers. Along the way, we consider slightly (but only slightly) more tractable questions such as: What reason is there to be moral? Is there such a thing as moral knowledge (and if so, how do we get it)? What are the fundamental principles of right and wrong (if there are any at all)? Is morality objective?

PHIL 270.00 Ancient Philosophy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62185

Allison E Murphy

Is there a key to a happy and successful human life? If so, how do you acquire it? Ancient philosophers thought the key was virtue and that your chances of obtaining it depend on the sort of life you lead. In this course we’ll examine what these philosophers meant by virtue and how they understood its implications for your everyday life. We will situate the ancient understanding of virtue in the context of larger questions of metaphysics (the nature of being and reality), psychology, and ethics, as they arise in foundational works from Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics.

PHIL 318.07 Buddhist Studies India Program: Buddhist Philosophy 8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62619

Arthur P McKeown

This course introduces students to major trends in Buddhist philosophy as it developed in India from the time of the Buddha until the eleventh century CE. The course emphasizes the relationships between philosophical reasoning and the meditation practices encountered in the Buddhist Meditation Traditions course. With this in mind, the course is organized into three units covering the Indian philosophical foundations for the Theravāda, Zen, and Tibetan Vajrayāna traditions. While paying attention first and foremost to philosophical arguments and their evolution, we also examine the ways in which metaphysics, epistemology and ethics inform one another in each tradition.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Buddhist Studies program

OCP GEP Buddhist Studies India

POSC 120.00 Democracy and Dictatorship 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62470

Huan Gao

An introduction to the array of different democratic and authoritarian political institutions in both developing and developed countries. We will also explore key issues in contemporary politics in countries around the world, such as nationalism and independence movements, revolution, regime change, state-making, and social movements.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: POSC 120.WL0 (Synonym 62471)

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62474

Summer N Forester

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 221.00 Latin American Politics 6 credits

Juan Diego Prieto

Comparative study of political institutions and conflicts in selected Latin American countries. Attention is focused on general problems and patterns of development, with some emphasis on U.S.-Latin American relations.

POSC 253.00 Welfare Capitalisms in Post-War Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61383

Paul Petzschmann

In this course students will explore the different kinds of welfare states that exist in Europe, the political economic and social conditions that made them possible and the debates about their strengths, weaknesses and prospects. We will review the so-called “varieties of capitalism” literature along with key welfare policies such as social insurance, health care, education, unemployment insurance, family and income support, and pensions. Welfare states use combinations of these policies differently to insure citizens against “old” and “new” risks. Finally, the course looks at how welfare regimes have responded of migration, financial, and public health crises.

POSC 264.00 Politics of Contemporary China 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62491

Huan Gao

This course examines the political, social, and economic transformation of China over the past century. Though contemporary issues are at the heart of the course, students will delve into an entire century of changes and upheaval to understand the roots of current affairs in China. Particular emphasis will be placed on state-building and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62492

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 274.00 Globalization, Pandemics, and Human Security 6 credits

Tun Myint

What are the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic on global politics and public policy? How do state responses to COVID-19 as well as historical cases such as the Black Death in Europe, the SARS outbreak in East Asia and Middle East, and the Ebola outbreak in Africa help us understand the scientific, political, and economic challenges of pandemics on countries and communities around the world? We will apply theories and concepts from IR, political economy, and natural sciences to explore these questions and consider what we can learn from those responses to address other global challenges like climate change.

POSC 278.00 Memory and Politics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61397

Mihaela Czobor-Lupp

Central to individual and collective identity, memory can be abused through the excess of commemoration. Is memory just a tool in the hands of nationalistic and divisive politics or can it be used for the cosmopolitan purpose of fighting oppression and injustice? To answer this question, we will read in this class literature on the nationalistic and cosmopolitan uses and abuses of memory and apply the theory to two case studies: the memory of the Jewish presence in Romanian society and politics and the role the memory of the Holocaust and Naqba plays in the relationship between Israel and Palestine.

POSC 280.00 Feminist Security Studies 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

CMC 301

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62494

Summer N Forester

Feminist security studies question and challenge traditional approaches to international relations and security, highlighting the myriad ways that state security practices can actually increase insecurity for many people. How and why does this security paradox exist and how do we escape it? In this class, we will explore the theoretical and analytical contributions of feminist security scholars and use these lessons to analyze a variety of policies, issues, and conflicts. The cases that we will cover include the UN resolution on women, peace, and security, Sweden’s feminist foreign policy, violence against women, and conflicts in Syria, Uganda, and Yemen.

POSC 336.00 Global Populist Politics* 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62479

Dev Gupta

Are populist politicians scoundrels or saviors? Regardless of the answer, populism is undeniably a growing force in politics around the world: in democracies as well as autocracies, rich and poor countries, and involving different ideologies. How can we understand this diversity? In this class, we will explore populism using a variety of comparative frameworks: temporal (situating the current crop of populism in historical context), ideological (comparing populisms of the left versus the right), as well as geographic. We will try to understand the hallmarks of populism, when and why it emerges, and its impact on political institutions and society.

PSYC 358.07 Cross-Cultural Psychology Seminar in Prague: Psychopathology 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 60177

Ken B Abrams

In the West mental illness has traditionally been approached with a biomedical model that views it as independent of culture. By contrast the "relativist" position assumes that, to a large extent, human behaviors are culturally determined and that the etiology and manifestation of mental disorders are affected by society and culture. This course will address such issues as well as their implications for assessment and treatment through an examination of several Western and non-Western societies, with a special emphasis on Czech society. There will be several guest lectures by Czech psychology professors as well as excursions within Prague to psychiatric hospitals and clinics, where students will meet with Czech clinicians and patients.

Prerequisite: Acceptance in Cross-Cultural Studies in Prague program

OCS Cross Cultural Psychology in Prague

RELG 100.02 Christianity and Colonialism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61434

Kristin C Bloomer

From its beginnings, Christianity has been concerned with the making of new persons and worlds: the creation of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth. It has also maintained a tight relationship to power, empire, and the making of modernity. In this course we will investigate this relationship within the context of colonial projects in the Americas, Africa, India, and the Pacific. We will trace the making of modern selves from Columbus to the abolition (and remainders) of slavery, and from the arrival of Cook in the Sandwich Islands to the journals of missionaries and the contemporary fight for Hawaiian sovereignty.

Held for new first year students

RELG 120.00 Introduction to Judaism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61368

Chumie Juni

What is Judaism? Who are Jewish people? What are Jewish texts, practices, ideas? What ripples have Jewish people, texts, practices, and ideas caused beyond their sphere? These questions will animate our study as we touch on specific points in over three millennia of history. We will immerse ourselves in Jewish texts, historic events, and cultural moments, trying to understand them on their own terms. At the same time, we will analyze them using key concepts such as ‘tradition,’ ‘culture,’ ‘power,’ and ‘diaspora.’ We will explore how ‘Jewishness’ has been constructed by different stakeholders, each claiming the authority to define it.

RELG 153.00 Introduction to Buddhism 6 credits

Asuka Sango

This course offers a survey of Buddhism from its inception in India some 2500 years ago to the present. We first address fundamental Buddhist ideas and practices, then their elaboration in the Mahayana and tantric movements, which emerged in the first millennium CE in India. We also consider the diffusion of Buddhism throughout Asia and to the West. Attention will be given to both continuity and diversity within Buddhism--to its commonalities and transformations in specific historical and cultural settings. We also will address philosophical, social, political, and ethical problems that are debated among Buddhists and scholars of Buddhism today.

RELG 359.07 Buddhist Studies India Program: Buddhist Meditation Traditions 8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 19, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62617

Arthur P McKeown

Students will complement their understanding of Buddhist thought and culture through the study and practice of traditional meditation disciplines. This course emphasizes the history, characteristics, and approach of three distinct meditation traditions within Buddhism: Vipassana, Zazen, and Dzogchen. Meditation practice and instruction is led in the morning and evening six days a week by representatives of these traditions who possess a theoretical as well as practical understanding of their discipline. Lectures and discussions led by the program director complement and contextualize the three meditation traditions being studied.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Carleton-Antioch Program required

OCP GEP Buddhist Studies India

RUSS 345.00 Russian Cultural Idioms of the Nineteenth Century 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 6, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 302

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62311

Anna M Dotlibova

An introduction to the names, quotations, and events that every Russian knows--knowledge which is essential to understanding Russian literature, history, and culture of the last two centuries. We will study the works of Russian writers (Griboedov and Pushkin, Leskov and Dostoevsky), composers (Glinka, Mussorgsky, Rimsky-­Korsakov, and Tchaikovsky), artists (Briullov, Ivanov, the Itinerants) and actors (Mochalov, Shchepkin) in the context of social thought and the social movements of the nineteenth century. Conducted in Russian.

Prerequisite: Russian 205 or permission of the instructor.

SOAN 110.00 Introduction to Anthropology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62332

Pamela Feldman-Savelsberg

Anthropology is the study of all human beings in all their diversity, an exploration of what it means to be human throughout the globe. This course helps us to see ourselves, and others, from a new perspective. By examining specific analytic concepts—such as culture—and research methods—such as participant observation—we learn how anthropologists seek to understand, document, and explain the stunning variety of human cultures and ways of organizing society. This course encourages you to consider how looking behind cultural assumptions helps anthropologists solve real world dilemmas.

Sophomore Priority.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: SOAN 110.WL0 (Synonym 62333)

SOAN 203.00 Anthropology of Good Intentions 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62321

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Is the environmental movement making progress? Do responsible products actually help local populations? Is international AID alleviating poverty and fostering development? Today there are thousands of programs with sustainable development goals yet their effectiveness is often contested at the local level. This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them. In doing so we hope to uncover common pitfalls behind good intentions and the need for sound social analysis that recognizes, examines, and evaluates the role of cultural complexity found in populations targeted by these programs.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 228.00 Public Sociology of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62331

Wes D Markofski

From the discipline’s earliest days, sociologists have considered religion a fascinating and perplexing object of study. Classical sociologists devoted enormous attention to the topic of religion, famously linking it to the development of capitalism and Western modernity (Weber), to social solidarity and symbolic classification systems (Durkheim), to political passivity and social conservatism (Marx), and to the varying forms of social, economic, and political life found in the world’s great civilizations. This course focuses on special topics in the contemporary sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on religion in public and political life in American and global civil society.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

SOAN 322.07 Buddhist Studies India Program: Contemporary Buddhist Culture 8 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62620

Arthur P McKeown

This course introduces students to the complexity and plurality of Buddhist traditions that have flourished in diverse societies and cultures in the modern era. This course enables students to sympathetically understand and critically investigate various Buddhist traditions and their historically and culturally specific configurations of philosophical beliefs, cultural values, everyday practices, social institutions, and personal experiences. Focusing on Buddhist traditions of South and Southeast Asia, Japan, and Tibet, we explore topics including syncretism and popular religion, monasticism, gender, economic development, social movements, political violence, and religious revival. Students expand their research skills in anthropology through field assignments in Bodh Gaya.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Buddhist Studies Program required

OCP GEP Buddhist Studies India

SPAN 205.01 Conversation and Composition 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 60416

Jorge Brioso

A course designed to develop the student's oral and written mastery of Spanish. Advanced study of grammar. Compositions and conversations based on cultural and literary topics. There is also an audio-video component focused on current affairs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 208.00 Coffee and News 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 10, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62427

Jorge Brioso

An excellent opportunity to brush up your Spanish while learning about current issues in Spain and Latin America. The class meets only once a week for an hour. Class requirements include reading specific sections of Spain's leading newspaper, El País, everyday on the internet (El País), and then meeting once a week to exchange ideas over coffee with a small group of students like yourself.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 210.00 Spanish Literature and Art through Graphic Novels 6 credits

Open: Size: 20, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 244

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62428

Humberto R Huergo

This course serves as a bridge between beginning (204-208) and advanced courses (220-300) in the Department of Spanish. Its main objective is to improve your written and oral skills by looking at some of the best examples of the graphic novel in Spain in recent years, including: Vida y muerte de Lorca (biography), Las Meninas (art history), Yo, asesino (detective novel), Homenaje a Cataluña (Spanish Civil War), Náufragos (urban tales of Madrid and Barcelona), Ardalén (autobiography), and others. Students will be expected to write several short compositions and to give oral presentations applying specific grammar skills in the context of texts and paintings examined in class.

Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent

SPAN 213.07 Pragmatics and Conversation in Context 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 59727

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

Pragmatics studies the relationship between language and context. Learning conversational skills in a second language requires students to linguistically adapt to a range of contexts, hence the field of pragmatics provides an ideal theoretical framework for a conversation class. For example, students learn about essential cultural and linguistic differences between English and Spanish with regard to conversational styles, politeness and verbal interaction in general.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205

Requires participation in Madrid OCS Program

SPAN 230.07 Madrid Program: Urban Transformation and Cultural Tensions in a Global City 6 credits

Open: Size: 28, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 59728

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

This course proposes an exploration of Madrid in a historical perspective to track those tensions between the persistence of the city and the pulsion of modernity, between the local traditions and peculiarities and the influences arriving as an effect of globalization. In this journey we will study the  transformation of Madrid from Middle Ages to the present, focusing on the struggles and strategies of the community adapting to the new circumstances. In more general terms, we will understand Madrid's way of life, the problems and particularities of its community, and as well as an introduction to the threats to urban society in a global world.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 and participation in Madrid Program

Requires participation in Madrid OCS Program

SPAN 301.00 Greek and Christian Tragedy 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 202

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62430

Jorge Brioso

This course is a comparative study of classical and Christian tragedy from Sophocles to Valle Inclán and from Aristotle to Nietzsche. Classes alternate between lectures and group discussions. Course requisites include a midterm exam and a final paper. All readings are in Spanish, Sophocles and Aristotle included.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 or above

Extra Time Required

SPAN 347.07 Madrid Program: Welcome to the Spanish Revolution. From the “Spanish Miracle” to the “Indignant Movement” (1940-2021) 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Synonym: 59776

Palmar Álvarez-Blanco

When we travel to another country are we tourists or travelers? What are our expectations when traveling? How do we get to know a place, its people, and culture? In this course we will walk through the history of some of the most important cultural and historical landmarks that mark the different transitions that Spain has gone through. We will become travelers who read, think, observe, and reflect upon political, cultural, and social questions connected to each text we read and every place we visit. This program includes several workshops with guest speakers, and significant contact with social collectives and communities in Spain.

Prerequisite: Spanish 205 and participation in OCS Madrid Progrm

Participation in OCS Madrid Program

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Requirements
You must take 6 credits of each of these.
Overlays
You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
Special Interests