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ASTR 110.00 Introduction to Astronomy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 48, Registered: 47, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61850

Ryan C Terrien

An introduction to current astronomy with an emphasis on how we know what we know. Topics include the solar system; the life cycles of stars; pulsars, quasars, and black holes; and the history and future fate of the universe. No mathematics background beyond high school algebra and trigonometry is assumed.

Extra Time Required

ASTR 113.00 Observational and Laboratory Astronomy 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141

MTWTHF
7:00pm10:00pm
Synonym: 61851

Ryan C Terrien

Theory and practice of basic techniques in observational and laboratory astronomy. Certain problems involve the use of the 16-inch and 8-inch telescopes.

Prerequisite: Astronomy 100, 110, 127, 232, 233, Physics 226, 228, 232, 233 or instructor permission

S/Cr/NC only

BIOL 125.53 Genes, Evolution, and Development: A Problem Solving Approach and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 62056

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Sarah Deel

This offering of Biology 125 offers a problem solving approach and covers the same concepts as the winter version of Biology 125. The course format allows time in class to apply new concepts by working through case study type problems with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences, and this offering of Biology 125 is designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background. In addition, the active learning component of the course is beneficial for students who like to learn by doing. Students who complete this course are well-prepared to continue on to Biology 126.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL3 (Synonym 62059)

BIOL 125.54 Genes, Evolution, and Development: A Problem Solving Approach and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62057

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Annie L Bosacker

This offering of Biology 125 offers a problem solving approach and covers the same concepts as the winter version of Biology 125. The course format allows time in class to apply new concepts by working through case study type problems with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences, and this offering of Biology 125 is designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background. In addition, the active learning component of the course is beneficial for students who like to learn by doing. Students who complete this course are well-prepared to continue on to Biology 126.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL4 (Synonym 62060)

BIOL 125.59 Genes, Evolution, and Development: A Problem Solving Approach and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Hulings 103

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62058

Jennifer M Ross-Wolff, Debby R Walser-Kuntz, Annie L Bosacker

This offering of Biology 125 offers a problem solving approach and covers the same concepts as the winter version of Biology 125. The course format allows time in class to apply new concepts by working through case study type problems with faculty present. Students enter Carleton from a wide variety of academic experiences, and this offering of Biology 125 is designed to provide a level playing field for students regardless of previous science background. In addition, the active learning component of the course is beneficial for students who like to learn by doing. Students who complete this course are well-prepared to continue on to Biology 126.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: BIOL 125.WL9 (Synonym 62061)

BIOL 215.00 Agroecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62062

David Hougen-Eitzman

Agriculture comprises the greatest single type of land use on the planet--as such, what happens on farms will have far-reaching effects on all other systems on the biosphere. With world human population growing exponentially, the search for sustainable agricultural systems is more important than ever. This course focuses on the scientific aspects of food production, which will involve the application of the principles of ecosystem and population ecology to agricultural systems. Topics covered will include organic farming, biotechnology, and effects of pesticide use. Several types of local farms will be visited--large, small, organic, conventional.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115, 120 or 125).; Requires concurrent registration in Biology 216

BIOL 224.00 Landscape Ecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Olin 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62064

John L Berini

In the Anthropocene, there has been dramatic change in the distribution of species and communities across the global landscape. The primary objective of this course is to introduce the theory and practice of landscape ecology. Throughout this course, we will consider the major themes of scale and hierarchy theory, compositional analysis, fragmentation, meta-populations, and landscape metrics, all within the broad context of how landscape patterns influence ecological process.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and Biology 126 or permission of the instructor and concurrent registration in BIOL 225

Requires concurrent registration in BIOL 225

BIOL 272.00 Integrative Animal Physiology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 426

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62085

Matt S Rand

This course explores biological functions from the biochemical level to the level of the whole organism. We will start with the regulatory systems exploring the function of neural and endocrine mechanisms. We will discuss the actions of a variety of toxins as adaptive components of venoms and pharmaceutical tools in human health research. Other topics include: muscle physiology, exercise and behavior; blood pressure regulation; salt and water balance in organisms from different environments; comparative reproduction, including human reproductive development and sexuality.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 280.00 Cell Biology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62066

Raka M Mitra

An examination of the structures and processes that underlie the life of cells, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic. Topics to be covered include methodologies used to study cells; organelles, membranes and other cellular components; protein targeting within the cell; and cellular communication and division.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and concurrent registration in Biology 281

BIOL 281 required.

BIOL 350.00 Evolution 6 credits

Closed: Size: 40, Registered: 37, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62068

Mark McKone

Principles and history of evolutionary change in wild populations, with consideration of both microevolutionary and macroevolutionary time scales. Topics covered include causes of change in gene frequency, the nature of adaptation, constraints on evolutionary change, the evolution of genes and proteins, rates of speciation and extinction, and the major events in evolutionary history.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

BIOL 360.00 Seminar: Climate Change Beneath the Waves 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61298

Gail D Schwieterman

Marine climate change comprises rising temperatures, increases in the frequency and severity of hypoxia, and ocean acidification. Together, these environmental variables can have profound effects on marine life. Or not. This course will focus upon the physiological capacities of various marine species to respond to changes in the ocean's chemical and physical properties. Through discussions of the primary literature, we will explore the physiological mechanisms that will mark species as winners or losers of the anthropocene.   

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126 and one additional 200 or 300 level Biology course or instructor consent

Waitlist only, Instructor Permission Required

BIOL 365.00 Seminar: Topics in Neuroscience 6 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62069

Fernan Jaramillo

We will focus on recent advances in neuroscience. All areas of neuroscience (cellular/molecular, developmental, systems, cognitive, and disease) will be considered. Classical or foundational papers will be used to provide background.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

Waitlist only

BIOL 395.00 Research Experience Seminar in Biology 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62073

Sarah Deel

This seminar course is intended for students who have completed a summer research project or internship in the biological sciences. The intent of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to discuss their research experience, learn from the experiences of other members of the class, read relevant primary literature, and prepare a poster for a student research symposium.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

1st 5 weeks

CHEM 122.00 An Introduction to Chemistry 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61658

Julia G Bakker-Arkema

An introduction to the fundamentals of chemistry to prepare students to enter subsequent chemistry courses (Chemistry 123 or 128). Atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, and gases will be covered in the course. Although learning through discovery-based processes, small groups, and short laboratory experimentation will occur, this is not a lab course and does not fulfill the requirements for medical school. This course assumes competence with simple algebra, but no prior chemistry experience.

Prerequisite: Students with high school chemistry should probably take Chemistry 123 or 128. (Determined by the self-administered Chemistry Placement Evaluation, Chemistry Home Page).

CHEM 123.52 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61676

Steven M Drew

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 123.57 Principles of Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 221

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61677

Steven M Drew

An introduction to chemistry for students who have strong high school preparation in chemistry or who have taken Chemistry 122. Topics include the electronic structure of atoms, periodicity, molecular geometry, thermodynamics, bonding, equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and acids and bases. Each offering will also focus on a special topic(s) selected by the instructor. Students cannot receive credit for both Chemistry 123 and 128.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 122 or placement via Chemistry Placement Exam (see Chemistry Department webpage)

CHEM 224.54 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61659

Andjela Radmilovic

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 224.59 Principles of Chemistry II and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Olin 141 / Anderson Hall 229

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61660

Andjela Radmilovic

A more advanced study of several core introductory chemistry principles. This course is suitable for students with advanced placement in chemistry or students who have completed Chemistry 123 or 128. Topics include coordination chemistry, advanced bonding models, spectroscopy, advanced acid/base and redox equilibria, and electrochemistry. The topics will be taught from varying perspectives using examples from biochemistry, the environment, energy, or materials chemistry. The lab will focus on developing computational, quantitative, and synthetic skills and will prepare students for more advanced laboratory work in chemistry.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or Chemistry 128

CHEM 233.52 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61661

Matt T Whited

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.54 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 22, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:00pm5:00pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61662

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 233.59 Organic Chemistry I and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 22, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Olin 149 / Anderson Hall 321

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm8:00am12:00pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61663

David G Alberg

Theoretical aspects of carbon chemistry are examined with reference to structure-reactivity relationships, functional groups, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms and spectroscopy. Laboratory work concentrates on modern techniques of organic chemistry, inquiry-based projects, and spectroscopic analysis. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128

CHEM 301.01 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61664

Deborah S Gross, Julia G Bakker-Arkema

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.02 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61665

Julia G Bakker-Arkema, Deborah S Gross

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.03 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61666

Deborah S Gross, Julia G Bakker-Arkema

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.04 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 8, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am1:00pm5:00pm8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61667

Julia G Bakker-Arkema, Deborah S Gross

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 301.05 Chemical Kinetics Laboratory 3 credits

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 329 / Anderson Hall 213

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:00am12:00pm8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 62728

Deborah S Gross, Julia G Bakker-Arkema

A mixed class/lab course with one four hour laboratory per week and weekly discussion/problem sessions. In class, the principles of kinetics will be developed with a mechanistic focus. In lab, experimental design and extensive independent project work will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 224 and 233 and Mathematics 120

CHEM 343.00 Chemical Thermodynamics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 40, Registered: 40, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61668

Daniela L Kohen

The major topic is chemical thermodynamics, including the First and Second Laws, the conditions for spontaneous change, thermochemistry, and chemical equilibrium. To showcase how chemists utilize energy concepts to solve problems, thermodynamics will be regularly applied to a number of real-world examples and scientific problems.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 123 or 128, Mathematics 120 or 211 and six credits from Physics courses number 131 to 165.

CHEM 360.00 Chemical Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61678

Chris T Calderone

Chemical biology is a burgeoning field at the intersection of chemistry and biology that involves the use of chemical tools and reactions to manipulate existing and even engineer completely new biological systems. This seminar course will focus on current literature to explore recent developments in this area, with topics including cell-surface engineering, chemical evolution, and synthetic biology.

Prerequisite: Chemistry 234 and Biology 125 or 126

CHEM 395.00 Research Experience Seminar in Chemistry 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61674

Sarah Deel

This seminar course is intended for students who have completed a summer research project or internship in the chemical sciences. The intent of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to discuss their research experience, learn from the experiences of other members of the class, read relevant primary literature, and prepare a poster for a student research symposium.

1st 5 weeks

CS 111.01 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60374

James O Ryan

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL1 (Synonym 60377)

CS 111.02 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 33, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm3:30pm4:30pm
Synonym: 60375

Aaron W Bauer

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

CS 111.03 Introduction to Computer Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 34, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 60376

David Liben-Nowell

This course will introduce you to computer programming and the design of algorithms. By writing programs to solve problems in areas such as image processing, text processing, and simple games, you will learn about recursive and iterative algorithms, complexity analysis, graphics, data representation, software engineering, and object-oriented design. No previous programming experience is necessary. Students who have received credit for Computer Science 201 or above are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 111.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 111.WL3 (Synonym 60378)

CS 201.01 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 26, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 60379

Anya E Vostinar

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CS 201.WL1 (Synonym 60381)

CS 201.02 Data Structures 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Olin 310

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 60380

Anya E Vostinar

Think back to your favorite assignment from Introduction to Computer Science. Did you ever get the feeling that "there has to be a better/smarter way to do this problem"? The Data Structures course is all about how to store information intelligently and access it efficiently. How can Google take your query, compare it to billions of web pages, and return the answer in less than one second? How can one store information so as to balance the competing needs for fast data retrieval and fast data modification? To help us answer questions like these, we will analyze and implement stacks, queues, trees, linked lists, graphs, and hash tables. Students who have received credit for a course for which Computer Science 201 is a prerequisite are not eligible to enroll in Computer Science 201.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 111 or instructor permission

CS 362.00 Computational Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61866

Layla K Oesper

Recent advances in high-throughput experimental techniques have revolutionized how biologists measure DNA, RNA and protein. The size and complexity of the resulting datasets have led to a new era where computational methods are essential to answering important biological questions. This course focuses on the process of transforming biological problems into well formed computational questions and the algorithms to solve them. Topics include approaches to sequence comparison and alignment; molecular evolution and phylogenetics; DNA/RNA sequencing and assembly; and specific disease applications including cancer genomics.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

ECON 110.01 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61307

Yingtong Xie

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.02 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61308

Victor Almeida

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 110.03 Principles of Macroeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61309

Michael T Hemesath

This course gives students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 111, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include analysis of the measurement, level, and distribution of national income; the concepts of inflation and depression; the role and structure of the banking system; fiscal and monetary stabilization techniques; implications of and limits to economic growth; and international economic relations.

ECON 111.01 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 304

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61310

Aaron M Swoboda

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.02 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 230

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61311

Prathi Seneviratne

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 111.03 Principles of Microeconomics 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

CMC 304

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61312

Jonathan M Lafky

This course gives the students a foundation in the general principles of economics as a basis for effective citizenship and, when combined with 110, as a preparation for all advanced study in economics. Topics include consumer choice theory; the formation of prices under competition, monopoly, and other market structures; the determination of wages, profits, and income from capital; the distribution of income; and an analysis of policy directed towards problems of public finance, pollution, natural resources, and public goods.

ECON 243.00 Market Development and Policy Reform in China 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 3, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 231

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61289

Denise M Hare

In the course of a few decades, China has launched itself from a poor country to a rising world power, at the same time substantially improving living standards and dramatically transforming its production base. What steps did China take to bring about these changes? We will examine China’s domestic economic reforms and development, considering the goals and impacts of various policy measures, along with on-going challenges. Topics to be considered include population, labor, income inequality, land, food production, industry, foreign relations, credit and financial markets, and the environment. While China will be our central focus, students will have some opportunities to compare and contrast with other country experiences.

Prerequisite: Eonomics 110 and 111

ECON 257.00 Economics of Gender 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61313

Prathi Seneviratne

This course uses economic theory and empirical evidence to examine gender differentials in education, marriage, fertility, earnings, labor market participation, occupational choice, and household work. Trends and patterns in gender-based outcomes will be examined across time, across countries, and within socio-economic groups, using empirical evidence from both historical and recent research. The impact of government and firm policies on gender outcomes will also be examined. By the end of the course, students will be able to utilize the most common economic tools in the study of gender inequality, as well as understand their strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 264.00 Health Care Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61314

Nathan D Grawe

This course will focus on the economics of medical care and how health care markets and systems work. We will consider both private health insurance markets and publicly provided social health insurance. The changes which demography, technology and the Affordable Health Care Act are bringing to health care delivery will be examined. Some time will be devoted to understanding the health care systems in other countries. This is a discussion course.

Prerequisite: Economics 111

ECON 267.00 Behavioral Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61315

Jonathan M Lafky

This course introduces experimental economics and behavioral economics as two complementary approaches to understanding economic decision making. We will study the use of controlled experiments to test and critique economic theories, as well as how these theories can be improved by introducing psychologically plausible assumptions to our models. We will read a broad survey of experimental and behavioral results, including risk and time preferences, prospect theory, other-regarding preferences, the design of laboratory and field experiments, and biases in decision making.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 274.00 Labor Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61316

Faress F Bhuiyan

Why do some people choose to work and others do not? Why are some people paid higher wages than others? What are the economic benefits of education for the individual and for society? How do government policies, such as subsidized child care, the Earned Income Tax Credit and the income tax influence whether people work and the number of hours they choose to work? These are some of the questions examined in labor economics. This course will focus on the labor supply and human capital decisions of individuals and households.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111

ECON 281.00 International Finance 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61317

Michael T Hemesath

This course studies theories of the multi-faceted interaction between the balance of international payments and foreign exchange market and the general levels of domestic prices, employment and economic activity. Topics include the balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, adjustment mechanisms in international payments, macroeconomic policies for internal and external balance, and international monetary systems.

Prerequisite: Economics 110

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61318

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both econometric theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Prior experience with R is strongly encouraged. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, experimental design, issues of functional specification, model overfitting and underfitting, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and either Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), and Economics 110 and 111 or instructor consent

ECON 330.00 Intermediate Price Theory 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61319

Jenny Bourne

An analysis of the forces determining relative prices within the framework of production and distribution. This class is normally taken by juniors. Sophomores considering enrolling should speak to the instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 110 and 111 and Mathematics 111

Extra Time Required

ECON 395.01 Advanced Topics in Labor Economics 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 211

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61320

Jenny Bourne

Labor economics is the study of work and pay. It encompasses a wide variety of topics, including the nature of the labor contract, human capital investment, fringe benefits, search and hiring, turnover, working conditions, discrimination, union activities, income and wealth distribution, and government policies. The seminar considers labor market activities within the larger context of general household decision-making about family formation, the timing of marriage and childbirth, and the allocation of unpaid household work among family members.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330 and 331 or instructor permission

ECON 395.02 Advanced Topics in Economic Development 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61321

Faress F Bhuiyan

Students will be exposed to theoretical models of economic development both from a micro and a macro perspective. Econometric models including probits, logits, instrumental variables, ordered probits, and ordered logits will be applied to micro-level data to study theoretical models dealing with migration, poverty, inequality, nutrition, development program evaluation, and decision making in the context of developing countries. Economic development will also be explored from the perspective of the "growth literature" where macro level panel data will be explored using fixed-effects and random-effects panel regression models.

Prerequisite: Economics 329, 330, and 331, or instructor permission

ENTS 120.51 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205 / CMC 110

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 62171

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL1 (Synonym 62559)

ENTS 120.52 Introduction to Geospatial Analysis & Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Laird 205 / CMC 110

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62172

Tsegaye H Nega

Spatial data analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, global positioning, and related technologies are increasingly important for understanding and analyzing a wide range of biophysical, social, and economic phenomena. This course serves as an overview and introduction to the concepts, algorithms, issues, and methods in describing, analyzing, and modeling geospatial data over a range of application areas.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: ENTS 120.WL2 (Synonym 62631)

ENTS 232.00 Research Methods in Environmental Studies 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 62175

Mark T Kanazawa

This course covers various methodologies that are used to prosecute interdisciplinary academic research relating to the environment. Among the topics covered are: identification of a research question, methods of analysis, hypothesis testing, and effective rhetorical methods, both oral and written.

GEOL 125.52 Introduction to Field Geology and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129 / Anderson Hall 127

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 61730

Cameron Davidson

This course introduces fundamental principles of geology and geological reasoning using the geology of southern Minnesota as a guide. Weather permitting, much of the classroom and lab time will be spent outdoors at nearby sites of geological interest. Using field observations, descriptions, data-gathering and interpretation, supplemented by lab work and critical reading, students will piece together the most important elements of the long and complex geologic history of southern Minnesota. Field trips, including one or two all-day weekend trips, and laboratories included.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have taken another 100-level Geology course

Sophomore Priority, Extra Time Required, weekend field trips

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 125.WL2 (Synonym 61732)

GEOL 135.53 Introduction to Climate Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 61740

Dan P Maxbauer

This course aims to provide a survey of topics relevant to understanding Earth’s climate past, present, and future. Topics of interest will include the Earth’s climate system, rates and magnitude of change, methods for reconstructing and understanding Earth’s climate history, and researching local climate archives including cave deposits, tree rings, lake sediments, and soils. Outdoor laboratories included.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 135.WL3 (Synonym 61742)

GEOL 135.54 Introduction to Climate Science 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 129

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61741

Dan P Maxbauer

This course aims to provide a survey of topics relevant to understanding Earth’s climate past, present, and future. Topics of interest will include the Earth’s climate system, rates and magnitude of change, methods for reconstructing and understanding Earth’s climate history, and researching local climate archives including cave deposits, tree rings, lake sediments, and soils. Outdoor laboratories included.

Sophomore Priority

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: GEOL 135.WL4 (Synonym 61743)

GEOL 210.51 Geomorphology and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 123

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 61407

Chloé Fandel

A lab and field-focused introduction to water resources – the processes driving the water cycle, the methods used to quantify and understand the flow of water, and the relationship between humans and water. Weekly field trips to nearby locations such as streams, wellfields, caves, and water infrastructure to develop skills including streamflow measurements, water quality monitoring, pump tests, and measuring soil properties. No previous outdoor experience required.

Prerequisite: 100 level Geology course or instructor permission

IDSC 100.01 Measured Thinking: Reasoning with Numbers about World Events, Health, Science and Social Issues 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 344

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 60404

Neil S Lutsky

This interdisciplinary course addresses one of the signal features of contemporary academic, professional, public, and personal life: a reliance on information and arguments involving numbers. We will examine how numbers are used and misused in verbal, statistical, and graphical form in discussions of world events, health, science, and social issues.

Held for new first year students

IDSC 100.02 Data Visualization As Activism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60547

Lin S Winton

Data visualization and activism have a common goal: to make the invisible more visible. This seminar will focus on the strengths and limitations of graphs and other charts to illuminate and convince. We will examine landmark visualizations that have changed history, starting with W.E.B. Du Bois's famous "data portraits", which debuted at the 1900 Paris World's Fair to tell a complex story of agency, sophistication, and oppression of African Americans in post-emancipation America. As we discuss the role of data viz in activism, we will learn to create our own visual arguments. No previous experience with statistics or graphing software is necessary.

Held for new first year students Only students eligible for TRIO should select this course. If you apply to TRIO but are not admitted, you will be allowed to change your course selection. TRIO Student Support Services is a program that serves U.S. citizens and permanent residents who meet established income requirements, are first-generation in college, and/or who have a documented disability., Instructor Permission Required

NEUR 127.52 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 61917

Eric D Hoopfer

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

NEUR 127.53 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am2:00pm6:00pm10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61918

Eric D Hoopfer

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

PHYS 100.00 Powering Our Future: Sustainable Energy Systems Principles and Examples 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 60716

Arjendu K Pattanayak

In this course we use the language of complex adaptive systems to consider models of global earth energy systems, as well as local processes. We will consider the physical, economic, material, and social impact of these energy systems via case studies, paying attention to ethical issues. This will allow us to define and identify desirable traits of sustainable energy systems which we will practice by observing, mapping, and evaluating real experimental sustainable systems. We will compare and contrast constraints and opportunities in future energy systems. 

Prerequisite: Requires concurrent registration in IDSC 198

Held for new first year students participating in FOCUS program

PHYS 131.52 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 21, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61856

Evan A Rich

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 131.59 Introduction to Physics: Newtonian Mechanics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61857

Evan A Rich, Arjendu K Pattanayak

A traditional introduction to classical mechanics using the Newtonian worldview. The kinematics and dynamics of some simple systems are investigated using Newton's laws, vector analysis, and the conservation laws of momentum and energy. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111, not open to students who have completed Physics 143, 144 or 145 at Carleton

1st 5 weeks

PHYS 151.52 Introduction to Physics: Relativity and Particles and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 20, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am1:00pm5:00pm9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61858

Cindy A Blaha, Marty Baylor

An introduction to principles of physics in the domain of the very small and very fast. Topics include the special theory of relativity, and selected applications to atomic, nuclear, and particle physics. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 120 or 121 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration). Not open to students who have completed Physics 143 or 144 at Carleton.

2nd 5 weeks

PHYS 152.59 Introduction to Physics: Environmental Physics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61859

Arjendu K Pattanayak

An introduction to principles of physics and their application to the environment. Topics include energy and its flows, engines, energy efficiency, energy usage and conservation in vehicles and buildings, the atmosphere, and climate change. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work or field trips.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 111 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration), 143, 144 or 145

2nd 5 weeks

PHYS 228.52 Atomic and Nuclear Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61860

Barry N Costanzi

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 228.54 Atomic and Nuclear Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61861

Barry N Costanzi, Marty Baylor

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 228.59 Atomic and Nuclear Physics and Lab 6 credits

Open: Size: 10, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 036 / Anderson Hall 035

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61862

Barry N Costanzi

An elementary but analytical introduction to the physics of atoms and nuclei. Topics include the particle aspects of electromagnetic radiation, an introduction to quantum mechanics, the wave aspects of material particles, the structure of atoms, X-ray and optical spectra, instruments of nuclear and particle physics, nuclear structure and elementary particles. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 143, 144 or 151

PHYS 343.59 Electronics and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 027

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm8:00am12:00pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61873

Melissa Eblen-Zayas

A study of the electrical circuits and electronics underlying modern physics instrumentation. Includes an introduction to microprocessor and microcomputer design. Approximately equal emphasis on analog and digital electronics. One laboratory per week.

Prerequisite: Physics 235

PHYS 355.00 Topics in Advanced Classical Mechanics 6 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Olin 106

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61875

Jay D Tasson

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods including central force motion, coupled harmonic oscillators, and the study of continuous systems. Additional subjects may include fluid dynamics, classical field theory or other specialized topics.

Prerequisite: Physics 231

POSC 122.00 Politics in America: Liberty and Equality 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

An introduction to American government and politics. Focus on the Congress, Presidency, political parties and interest groups, the courts and the Constitution. Particular attention will be given to the public policy debates that divide liberals and conservatives and how these divisions are rooted in American political culture.

Not Writing Rich

POSC 170.00 International Relations and World Politics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 27, Waitlist: 0

Willis 204

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62474

Summer N Forester

What are the foundational theories and practices of international relations and world politics? This course addresses topics of a geopolitical, commercial and ideological character as they relate to global systems including: great power politics, polycentricity, and international organizations. It also explores the dynamic intersection of world politics with war, terrorism, nuclear weapons, national security, human security, human rights, and the globalization of economic and social development.

POSC 218.00 Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods?

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Not open to first year students.

POSC 223.00 Political Science Lab: Content Analysis 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62475

Barbara Allen

How do we know if a news organization is ideologically biased? How do we show that gender influences how world leaders approach defense policy? How do we track the growth in misinformation in political advertising worldwide? One foundational methodology for studying questions like these is content analysis. This course will enable you to analyze the texts of speeches, debates, news stories, tweets, press conferences, letters, ad texts--and the visual representations that accompany many of these forms of communication. Students will learn the basics of defining content, operationalizing variables, and conducting the analysis to get valid, reliable data.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62476

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275) or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62492

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

POSC 274.00 Globalization, Pandemics, and Human Security 6 credits

Tun Myint

What are the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic on global politics and public policy? How do state responses to COVID-19 as well as historical cases such as the Black Death in Europe, the SARS outbreak in East Asia and Middle East, and the Ebola outbreak in Africa help us understand the scientific, political, and economic challenges of pandemics on countries and communities around the world? We will apply theories and concepts from IR, political economy, and natural sciences to explore these questions and consider what we can learn from those responses to address other global challenges like climate change.

PSYC 210.00 Psychology of Learning and Memory 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61774

Julie J Neiworth

A summary of theoretical approaches, historical influences and contemporary research in the area of human and animal learning. The course provides a background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, and these are applied to issues such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, decision-making, education, and choice. It is recommended that students enroll concurrently in Psychology 211. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission

PSYC 211.00 Laboratory Research Methods in Learning and Memory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Hulings B12

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61775

Julie J Neiworth

This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning and memory. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission; Concurrent registration in Psychology 210

PSYC 210 required previously or concurrently.

PSYC 211.02 Laboratory Research Methods in Learning and Memory 2 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Hulings B12

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61776

Julie J Neiworth

This course accompanies Psychology 210. Students will replicate classical studies and plan and conduct original empirical research projects in the study of human and animal learning and memory. Psychology 211 requires concurrent or prior registration in Psychology 210. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission; Concurrent registration in Psychology 210

PSYC 210 required previously or concurrently.

PSYC 260.00 Health Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61778

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 261.01 Health Psychology Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61779

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

This course provides students with direct experience applying principles of health psychology. Students will engage in a term-long self-directed project aimed at increasing the frequency of a healthy behavior (such as exercising) or decreasing the frequency of an unhealthy behavior (such as smoking). Additionally, we will read and discuss case studies that relate to the current topic in the lecture portion of the course. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 260. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Psychology 260

PSYC 260 required.

PSYC 261.02 Health Psychology Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 12, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Olin 102

MTWTHF
2:00pm5:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61780

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

This course provides students with direct experience applying principles of health psychology. Students will engage in a term-long self-directed project aimed at increasing the frequency of a healthy behavior (such as exercising) or decreasing the frequency of an unhealthy behavior (such as smoking). Additionally, we will read and discuss case studies that relate to the current topic in the lecture portion of the course. Requires concurrent registration in Psychology 260. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Psychology 260

PSYC 260 required.

RELG 120.00 Introduction to Judaism 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 8, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61368

Chumie Juni

What is Judaism? Who are Jewish people? What are Jewish texts, practices, ideas? What ripples have Jewish people, texts, practices, and ideas caused beyond their sphere? These questions will animate our study as we touch on specific points in over three millennia of history. We will immerse ourselves in Jewish texts, historic events, and cultural moments, trying to understand them on their own terms. At the same time, we will analyze them using key concepts such as ‘tradition,’ ‘culture,’ ‘power,’ and ‘diaspora.’ We will explore how ‘Jewishness’ has been constructed by different stakeholders, each claiming the authority to define it.

SOAN 100.00 “We’re all in this together!” Rhetorical Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Language & Dining Center 104

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60553

Annette M Nierobisz

When the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, a series of cultural messages quickly materialized in U.S. society. Statements such as, “we’re all in this together” and “the silver linings of coronavirus,” emphasized unity and gratitude while existing socio-political and generational divides were reinforced with “it’s a hoax” and “young people are spreading the virus.” What do these messages reveal about ourselves and society? This A&I seminar introduces students to the formal discipline of sociology through deconstructing rhetorical responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We seek to understand why these cultural messages are problematic using an intellectual perspective that emphasizes “the social construction of reality.”

Held for new First Year Students

SOAN 252.00 Growing up in an Aging Society 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 233

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62541

Annette M Nierobisz

Both the U.S. and global populations are trending toward a world with far fewer young people than ever before. So, what does it mean to grow up in a rapidly aging society? This course explores age, aging, and its various intersections with demographic characteristics including gender, sexuality, race, and social class. We situate age and aging within the context of macro-structural, institutional, and micro-everyday realms. Some topics we will examine include: media depictions and stereotypes; interpersonal relationships and caregiving; the workplace and retirement; and both the perceptions and inevitable realities of an aging population.

STAT 120.01 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

CMC 210

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61443

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.02 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61444

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 120.03 Introduction to Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 32, Registered: 24, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm3:10pm4:20pm3:30pm4:30pm
Synonym: 61445

Deepak Bastola

(Formerly MATH 215) Introduction to statistics and data analysis. Practical aspects of statistics, including extensive use of statistical software, interpretation and communication of results, will be emphasized. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, correlation and linear regression, design of experiments, basic probability, the normal distribution, randomization approach to inference, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and two-way tables. Students who have taken Mathematics 211 are encouraged to consider the more advanced Mathematics 240/Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 265 and 275) Probability/Statistical Inference sequence.

Prerequisite: Not open to students who have already received credit for Psychology 200/201, Sociology/Anthropology 239 or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275).

Formerly Mathematics 215

STAT 220.00 Introduction to Data Science 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61447

Adam Loy

(Formerly Mathematics 285) This course will cover the computational side of data analysis, including data acquisition, management, and visualization tools. Topics may include: data scraping, data wrangling, data visualization using packages such as ggplots, interactive graphics using tools such as Shiny, supervised and unsupervised classification methods, and understanding and visualizing spatial data. We will use the statistics software R in this course.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215), Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Formerly Mathematics 285

STAT 230.00 Applied Regression Analysis 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

CMC 102

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61448

Katie R St. Clair

(Formerly Mathematics 245) A second course in statistics covering simple linear regression, multiple regression and ANOVA, and logistic regression. Exploratory graphical methods, model building and model checking techniques will be emphasized with extensive use of statistical software to analyze real-life data.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), Psychology 200, or AP Statistics Exam score of 4 or 5.

Formerly Mathematics 245

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

CMC 201

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61449

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

STAT 340.00 Bayesian Statistics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

CMC 206

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61454

Adam Loy

Formerly MATH 315) An introduction to statistical inference and modeling in the Bayesian paradigm. Topics include Bayes’ Theorem, common prior and posterior distributions, hierarchical models, Markov chain Monte Carlo methods (e.g., the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and Gibbs sampler) and model adequacy and posterior predictive checks. The course uses R extensively for simulations.

Prerequisite: Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275)

Fomerly Mathematics 315

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