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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in AND 121 found 9 courses.

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ARCN 222.54 Experimental Archaeology and Experiential History 6 credits

Open: Size: 18, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm1:00pm5:00pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61722

Austin P Mason

This course offers an experiential approach to crafts, technologies, and other material practices in premodern societies. Through hands-on activities and collaborations with local craftspeople, farmers, and other experts, this course will examine and test a variety of hypotheses about how people in the past lived their lives. How did prehistoric people produce stone tools, pottery, and metal? How did ancient Greeks and Romans feed and clothe themselves? How did medieval Europeans build their homes and bury their dead? Students will answer these questions and more by actively participating in a range of experimental archaeology and experiential history projects. Lab required.

Prerequisite: One previous Archaeology pertinent course

BIOL 395.00 Research Experience Seminar in Biology 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62073

Sarah Deel

This seminar course is intended for students who have completed a summer research project or internship in the biological sciences. The intent of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to discuss their research experience, learn from the experiences of other members of the class, read relevant primary literature, and prepare a poster for a student research symposium.

Prerequisite: Biology 125 and 126

1st 5 weeks

CHEM 395.00 Research Experience Seminar in Chemistry 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 2, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61674

Sarah Deel

This seminar course is intended for students who have completed a summer research project or internship in the chemical sciences. The intent of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to discuss their research experience, learn from the experiences of other members of the class, read relevant primary literature, and prepare a poster for a student research symposium.

1st 5 weeks

CLAS 122.00 The Archaeology of Mediterranean Prehistory: From the Beginning to the Classical Age 6 credits

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62260

Alex R Knodell

"Never say that prehistory is not history." The late Fernand Braudel had it right. Over 99 percent of human history predates the written word, and this course examines one of the world's most diverse, yet unifying environments--the Mediterranean Sea--from the earliest populations around its shores to the emergence of the Classical world of the Greeks and Romans. Neanderthals and modern humans, the first artists and farmers, multiculturalism among Greeks, Phoenicians, Etruscans, and others... These are some of the topics to be covered as we study the precursors and roots of what would become "Western" civilization.

CS 362.00 Computational Biology 6 credits

Open: Size: 34, Registered: 22, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61866

Layla K Oesper

Recent advances in high-throughput experimental techniques have revolutionized how biologists measure DNA, RNA and protein. The size and complexity of the resulting datasets have led to a new era where computational methods are essential to answering important biological questions. This course focuses on the process of transforming biological problems into well formed computational questions and the algorithms to solve them. Topics include approaches to sequence comparison and alignment; molecular evolution and phylogenetics; DNA/RNA sequencing and assembly; and specific disease applications including cancer genomics.

Prerequisite: Computer Science 201 and Computer Science 202 (Mathematics 236 will be accepted in lieu of Computer Science 202)

IDSC 298.00 FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 33, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 61402

Fernan Jaramillo

This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 198 as first year student

Prior registration in IDSC 198

PSYC 210.00 Psychology of Learning and Memory 6 credits

Open: Size: 35, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
8:30am9:40am8:30am9:40am8:30am9:30am
Synonym: 61774

Julie J Neiworth

A summary of theoretical approaches, historical influences and contemporary research in the area of human and animal learning. The course provides a background in classical, operant, and contemporary conditioning models, and these are applied to issues such as behavioral therapy, drug addiction, decision-making, education, and choice. It is recommended that students enroll concurrently in Psychology 211. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 210 and 211 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or Neuroscience 127 or instructor permission

PSYC 250.00 Developmental Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61777

Kathleen M Galotti

An introduction to the concept of development, examining both theoretical models and empirical evidence. Prenatal through late childhood is covered with some discussion of adolescence when time permits. Topics include the development of personality and identity, social behavior and knowledge, and cognition. In addition, attention is paid to current applications of theory to such topics as: day care, the role of the media, and parenting.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110 or instructor permission

PSYC 260.00 Health Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61778

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

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