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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in BOLI 161 found 6 courses.

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ARTH 100.01 Laughing Matters: The History of Political Caricature 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61414

Baird E Jarman

For over two centuries political caricature has permeated the popular culture of democratic societies. This course surveys that history, covering topics including revolutionary printmaking, editorial cartooning, political censorship, mock journalism, and anti-cartoon terrorism. We will explore pictorial protests against war, corruption, bigotry, and injustice, as well as graphic ridicule heaped upon political figures ranging from King Louis-Philippe to Boss Tweed to President Trump. But how effective is political caricature? Does it sway minds or merely reinforce extant opinions? When, if ever, does it become objectionable or libelous? Can comically exaggerated or distorted imagery actually reveal subtle insights or hidden truths?

Held for new first year students

ARTH 214.00 Queer Art 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61524

Ross K Elfline

Beyond surveying the rich history of arts by LGBTQA+ individuals, this course takes as its object of study the ways in which the arts have been used to question, undermine, and subvert the gendered and sexual norms of dominant cultures—in short, to queer them. In so doing, such visual and performative practices offer new, alternative models of living and acting in the world based on liberatory politics and aesthetics. This course will consider topics such as: censorship of queer artists; art of the AIDS crisis; activist performance; the sexual politics of public space; and queer intersections of race, class and gender in visual art among others.

Prerequisite: Any one art history course

Extra Time Required

ARTH 230.00 Princesses as Patrons circa 1500 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61525

Martha A Wolff

Three remarkable royal women (Queen Isabel of Castile, Anne of France, and Archduchess Margaret of Austria, regent of the Netherlands), linked by blood, marriage, and shifting dynastic alliances, provide a lens to examine patronage networks and collecting culture in France, Spain and the Netherlands circa 1500, at the transition from the late middle ages to the Renaissance. Isabel of Castile was exceptional as a sovereign queen; for most royal women power was indirect, delegated, and carefully masked, while the requirement to produce an heir was paramount. The course will consider the interplay of these constraints and the works of art these princesses commissioned and lived with by looking at topics like palace design, inventories of royal collections and the hierarchies of luxury arts they reveal, portraiture as an expression of dynastic piety and marriage politics, and the new prominence of painting as an independent and collectable medium.

Prerequisite: Any one art history course

Extra Time Required

ARTH 246.00 What Has Been Happening in Modern Architectural Design? 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61526

David T Van Zanten

Architecture in our culture has become the art of solving spatial problems with large-scale constructions, at first in drawings but now as patterns on computer screens. This course examines four aspects of this Western building conceptualization during the last two hundred years, beginning with the exploration of it as the art of building and ending in coding--in our digital world today. We will focus on four fundamental moments in this historical development: 1) the emergence of the architect as a new exploring, reasoning figure in European culture in the early nineteenth-century (Labrouste, Ruskin, Viollet-le-Duc); 2) transforming into a broad conceiver of whole cities facing the demands of the late-nineteenth century urban “explosion” (Haussmann, Burnham); 3) but rapidly progressing to the abstraction of “building art,” a web of machine-like systems during the first half of the twentieth century (F. L. Wright, Le Corbusier, Hilberseimer); 4) to now sink—with struggles and false-starts—into our new computerized world.

Prerequisite: Any one art history course

Extra Time Required

ARTH 266.00 Arts of the Japanese Tea Ceremony 6 credits

Closed: Size: 14, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61527

Kathleen M Ryor

This course will examine the history and aesthetics of the tea ceremony in Japan (chanoyu).  It will focus on the types of objects produced for use in the Japanese tea ceremony from the fifteenth century through the present. Themes to be explored include: the relationship of social status and politics to the development of chanoyu; the religious dimensions of the tea ceremony; gender roles of tea practitioners; nationalist appropriation of the tea ceremony and its relationship to the mingei movement in the twentieth century; and the international promotion of the Japanese tea ceremony post-WWII.

Prerequisite: Requires concurrent registration in Studio Arts 236

Extra Time Required, requires concurrent registration in ARTS 236

ASST 100.00 The Cultural Life of Plants in China 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Boliou 161

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61261

Kathleen M Ryor

This seminar will examine the role of plants have played in China from ancient times through the end of the imperial era. It will investigate the uses of different types of plants (fruits, vegetables, flowers, grasses, etc.) in such areas as medicine, food, literature, art, and landscape management. We will seek to understand the ways in which plants function across and make connection between various aspects of human activities. In addition, the course will emphasize how plants have actively helped form Chinese cultural practices and systems of meaning throughout various historical periods.

Held for new first year students

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