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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in LEIG 236 found 7 courses.

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ASST 135.00 Exploring India: Orientation/Orientalism 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 30, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 61938

Meera Sehgal

Images of India are ever-present in American media and pop culture. The land of Gandhi, call-centers, a multitude of religious faiths, the Taj Mahal, oppressed women, vast poverty and wealth. Come and learn about India, a region of immense contrasts and diversities, home to more than one billion people. We will explore Indian history and geography, cuisine and traditions, people and their languages, art, architecture and music, while being introduced to the Hindi and Urdu languages. Our class materials will include scholarly writings, guest speakers, popular cinema, documentary films, poetry, music, and food.

HIST 116.00 Intro to Indigenous Histories, 1887-present 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62436

Meredith L McCoy

Many Americans grow up with a fictionalized view of Indigenous people (sometimes also called Native Americans/American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians within the U.S. context). Understanding Indigenous peoples’ histories, presents, and possible futures requires moving beyond these stereotypes and listening to Indigenous perspectives. In this class, we will begin to learn about Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island and the Pacific through tribal histories, legislation, Supreme Court cases, and personal narratives. The course will focus on the period from 1887 to 2018 with major themes including (among others) agency, resistance, resilience, settler colonialism, discrimination, and structural racism.

RELG 110.00 Understanding Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 62384

Chumie Juni

How can we best understand the role of religion in the world today, and how should we interpret the meaning of religious traditions -- their texts and practices -- in history and culture? This class takes an exciting tour through selected themes and puzzles related to the fascinating and diverse expressions of religion throughout the world. From politics and pop culture, to religious philosophies and spiritual practices, to rituals, scriptures, gender, religious authority, and more, students will explore how these issues emerge in a variety of religions, places, and historical moments in the U.S. and across the globe.

RELG 153.00 Introduction to Buddhism 6 credits

Asuka Sango

This course offers a survey of Buddhism from its inception in India some 2500 years ago to the present. We first address fundamental Buddhist ideas and practices, then their elaboration in the Mahayana and tantric movements, which emerged in the first millennium CE in India. We also consider the diffusion of Buddhism throughout Asia and to the West. Attention will be given to both continuity and diversity within Buddhism--to its commonalities and transformations in specific historical and cultural settings. We also will address philosophical, social, political, and ethical problems that are debated among Buddhists and scholars of Buddhism today.

RELG 270.00 Philosophy of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62387

Caleb S Hendrickson

A study of classic issues in the philosophy of religion and philosophical theology. Possible topics include: the existence and nature of God; the status and nature of religious experience; the problem of evil; the meaning of faith, belief, and truth; definitions of the self and salvation; and the significance of religious pluralism for claims about truth and God. Readings are drawn from the work of modern and contemporary philosophers and theologians. Prerequisites: Previous work in religion or philosophy will be helpful but is not required.

SOAN 203.00 Anthropology of Good Intentions 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 29, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
8:15am10:00am8:15am10:00am
Synonym: 62321

Constanza C Ocampo-Raeder

Is the environmental movement making progress? Do responsible products actually help local populations? Is international AID alleviating poverty and fostering development? Today there are thousands of programs with sustainable development goals yet their effectiveness is often contested at the local level. This course explores the impacts of sustainable development, conservation, and AID programs to look beyond the good intentions of those that implement them. In doing so we hope to uncover common pitfalls behind good intentions and the need for sound social analysis that recognizes, examines, and evaluates the role of cultural complexity found in populations targeted by these programs.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses numbered 200 or above

SOAN 228.00 Public Sociology of Religion 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62331

Wes D Markofski

From the discipline’s earliest days, sociologists have considered religion a fascinating and perplexing object of study. Classical sociologists devoted enormous attention to the topic of religion, famously linking it to the development of capitalism and Western modernity (Weber), to social solidarity and symbolic classification systems (Durkheim), to political passivity and social conservatism (Marx), and to the varying forms of social, economic, and political life found in the world’s great civilizations. This course focuses on special topics in the contemporary sociology of religion, with a particular emphasis on religion in public and political life in American and global civil society.

Prerequisite: The department strongly recommends that Sociology/Anthropology 110 or 111 be taken prior to enrolling in courses number 200 or above

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