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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in LEIG 402 found 5 courses.

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EDUC 110.00 Introduction to Educational Studies 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62403

Anita P Chikkatur

This course will focus on education as a multidisciplinary field of study. We will explore the meanings of education within individual lives and institutional contexts, learn to critically examine the assumptions that writers, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers bring to the study of education, and read texts from a variety of disciplines. What has "education" meant in the past? What does "education" mean in contemporary American society? What might "education" mean to people with differing circumstances and perspectives? And what should "education" mean in the future? Open only to first-and second-year students.

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Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: EDUC 110.WL0 (Synonym 62404)

GWSS 150.00 Working Sex: Commercial Sexual Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 28, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61375

Jayne A Swift

Why is the sale of sex criminalized? Who participates in sexual labor and for what reasons? What are the goals and tactics of sex worker social movements? Sexual commerce is an integral facet of U.S. society and the global economy, and yet it elicits strong and paradoxical reactions. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of commercial sexual cultures. Taking a transnational approach, we will examine historical, political, and economic changes in sexual economies and the regulation of commercial sex. Course readings explore how sex workers have collectively organized to resist criminalization and fight for a better future.

HIST 125.00 African American History I: From Africa to the Civil War 6 credits

Noël Voltz

This course is a survey of early African American history. It will introduce students to major themes and events while also covering historical interpretations and debates in the field. Core themes of the course include migration, conflict, and culture. Beginning with autonomous African politics, the course traces the development of the United States through the experiences of enslaved and free African American women and men to the Civil War. The main aim of the course is for students to become familiar with key issues and developments in African American history and their centrality to understanding U.S. history.

POSC 253.00 Welfare Capitalisms in Post-War Europe 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61383

Paul Petzschmann

In this course students will explore the different kinds of welfare states that exist in Europe, the political economic and social conditions that made them possible and the debates about their strengths, weaknesses and prospects. We will review the so-called “varieties of capitalism” literature along with key welfare policies such as social insurance, health care, education, unemployment insurance, family and income support, and pensions. Welfare states use combinations of these policies differently to insure citizens against “old” and “new” risks. Finally, the course looks at how welfare regimes have responded of migration, financial, and public health crises.

POSC 264.00 Politics of Contemporary China 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 402

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62491

Huan Gao

This course examines the political, social, and economic transformation of China over the past century. Though contemporary issues are at the heart of the course, students will delve into an entire century of changes and upheaval to understand the roots of current affairs in China. Particular emphasis will be placed on state-building and how this has changed state-society relations at the grassroots. Students will also explore how the Chinese Communist Party has survived and even thrived while many other Communist regimes have fallen and assess the relationship between economic development and democratization.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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