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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in WCC 132 found 7 courses.

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CAMS 100.00 Media & Misinformation 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am9:40am10:40am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61415

Dimitrios Pavlounis

While the relationship between media and misinformation is not new, rapid technological change, including the emergence of major social media platforms, has resulted in an information environment where we are constantly confronted by conspiracy theories, manipulated statistics, doctored images, hyperpartisan clickbait, questionable ‘research’ studies, and everything in between. Left unchecked, this flow of misinformation can exacerbate social inequalities and undermine trust in the foundations of a democratic society. This course explores how misinformation spreads across a variety of networked media channels and examines the technical, social, and economic structures that enable this spread. Using current events to ground our inquiry, we will investigate topics such as algorithmic bias and recommendation systems; the evolution of conspiracy theories; memes and visual disinformation; media manipulation tactics; and the cultural capital of social media influencers. We will also develop best practices that can help orient us within our increasingly polluted information environment.  

Held for new first year students

CAMS 111.01 Digital Foundations 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138 / Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61950

Rini Y Keagy

This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS' studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 111.WL1 (Synonym 61951)

CAMS 111.02 Digital Foundations 6 credits

Closed: Size: 12, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 138 / Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61961

Rini Y Keagy

This class introduces students to the full range of production tools and forms, building both the technical and conceptual skills needed to continue at more advanced levels. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, the role of sound and how to record and mix it, field and studio production, lighting, and editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Course work will include individual and group production projects, readings, and writing. This is an essential foundation for anyone interested in moving-image production and learning the specifics of CAMS' studios, cameras, and lighting equipment.

Sophomore Priority. Extra Time required.

Waitlist for Juniors and Seniors: CAMS 111.WL2 (Synonym 61962)

CAMS 210.00 Film History I 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 61963

Dimitrios Pavlounis

This course surveys the first half-century of cinema history, focusing on film structure and style as well as transformations in technology, industry and society. Topics include series photography, the nickelodeon boom, local movie-going, Italian super-spectacles, early African American cinema, women film pioneers, abstraction and surrealism, German Expressionism, Soviet silent cinema, Chaplin and Keaton, the advent of sound and color technologies, the Production Code, the American Studio System, Britain and early Hitchcock, Popular Front cinema in France, and early Japanese cinema. Assignments aim to develop skills in close analysis and working with primary sources in researching and writing film history.

Extra Time Evening Screenings

ECON 329.00 Econometrics 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61318

Mark T Kanazawa

This course is an introduction to the statistical methods used by economists to test hypotheses and to study and quantify economic relationships. The course emphasizes both econometric theory and practical application through analysis of economic data sets using statistical software. Prior experience with R is strongly encouraged. Topics include two-variable and multiple regression, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous structural change, parameter restrictions, model construction, experimental design, issues of functional specification, model overfitting and underfitting, heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, and multicollinearity.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 and either Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) or Statistics 250 (formerly Mathematics 275), and Economics 110 and 111 or instructor consent

LING 115.00 Introduction to the Theory of Syntax 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 132

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62052

Catherine R Fortin

This course is organized to enable the student to actively participate in the construction of a rather elaborate theory of the nature of human cognitive capacity to acquire and use natural languages. In particular, we concentrate on one aspect of that capacity: the unconscious acquisition of a grammar that enables a speaker of a language to produce and recognize sentences that have not been previously encountered. In the first part of the course, we concentrate on gathering notation and terminology intended to allow an explicit and manageable description. In the second part, we depend on written and oral student contributions in a cooperative enterprise of theory construction.

POSC 218.00 Schools, Scholarship and Policy in the United States 6 credits

Richard A Keiser

What can scholarship tell us about educational strategies to reduce achievement gaps and economic opportunity? Do the policies promoted at the city, state and federal levels reflect that knowledge? How are these policies made? What is the relationship between schools and the economic class, racial composition and housing stock of their neighborhoods?

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

Not open to first year students.

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