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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in WCC 136 found 6 courses.

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CAMS 177.00 Television Studio Production 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 12, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136 / Weitz Center 040

MTWTHF
8:30am11:00am8:30am11:00am

Requirements Met:

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Synonym: 61952

Paul Hager

In this hands-on studio television production course, students learn professional studio methods and techniques for creating both fiction and nonfiction television programs. Concepts include lighting and set design, blocking actors, directing cameras, composition, switching, sound recording and scripting. Students work in teams to produce four assignments, crewing for each other's productions in front of and behind the camera, in the control room, and in post-production.

Extra Time Required

CAMS 320.00 Sound Studies Seminar 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 11, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61964

Jay S Beck

This course presents the broader field of Sound Studies, its debates and issues. Drawing on a diverse set of interdisciplinary perspectives, the seminar explores the range of academic work on sound to examine the relationship between sound and listening, sound and perception, sound and memory, and sound and modern thought. Topics addressed include but are not limited to sound technologies and industries, acoustic perception, sound and image relations, sound in media, philosophies of listening, sound semiotics, speech and communication, voice and subject formation, sound art, the social history of noise, and hearing cultures.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 110 or instructor permission

HIST 100.02 Beloved or Dangerous: Cities in Latin American History 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 14, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 61293

Jennifer L Schaefer

Beloved or dangerous. Ordered or chaotic. Modern or backward. What motivated these conflicting descriptions of Latin American cities? Why were cities like Buenos Aires, Havana, Mexico City, and Rio de Janeiro so important as places of political and economic power? How were these cities sites of cultural exchange for immigrant, Afro-Latin American, and Indigenous communities? In this course, we will answer these questions by exploring the histories of Latin America cities from the colonial period to the present. We will consider how urban spaces shaped people’s identities and daily lives and how these cities became places of national and global influence.

Held for incoming first year students

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62440

Antony E Adler

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

IDSC 100.03 Games and Gaming Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136 / Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm6:15pm8:30pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 60548

George Cusack

In this seminar, we will use games (both by studying them and by playing them) as a lens through which we can explore all manner of fascinating questions. How do the games we play shape our culture and our communities?  What makes a game fun, engaging, addictive, boring, brutal, or banal? How can games encourage certain kinds of behavior, even after we've stopped playing them?  Could we make Carleton itself a bit better--or at least more fun--if we gamified certain aspects of life here? To aid our exploration, we’ll draw on readings from multiple genres and employ a variety of research methods to analyze games from social, textual, and design perspectives. This course will also include weekly lab sessions on Wednesday evenings (6:15-8:30PM).  Students will be required to attend at least eight out of ten lab sessions.

Held for new first year students Extra Time

POSC 307.00 Go Our Own Way: Autonomy in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62495

Barbara Allen

“Every civil rights bill was passed for white people, not black people. I am a human being. I know … I have right(s). White people didn’t know that. … so [they] had to … to tell that white man, 'he’s a human being, don’t stop him.' That bill was for the white man…. I knew [my rights] all the time.” Stokely Carmichael spoke for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee viewpoint in 1966. The Black Panther Party enacted basic civic responsibilities in their programs. Ella Baker spoke of autonomy in community. This seminar brings voices across generations speaking to current affairs.

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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You must take 6 credits of each of these,
except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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