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Your search for courses for 21/FA and in WCC 235 found 8 courses.

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IDSC 100.03 Games and Gaming Cultures 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136 / Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm6:15pm8:30pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 60548

George Cusack

In this seminar, we will use games (both by studying them and by playing them) as a lens through which we can explore all manner of fascinating questions. How do the games we play shape our culture and our communities?  What makes a game fun, engaging, addictive, boring, brutal, or banal? How can games encourage certain kinds of behavior, even after we've stopped playing them?  Could we make Carleton itself a bit better--or at least more fun--if we gamified certain aspects of life here? To aid our exploration, we’ll draw on readings from multiple genres and employ a variety of research methods to analyze games from social, textual, and design perspectives. This course will also include weekly lab sessions on Wednesday evenings (6:15-8:30PM).  Students will be required to attend at least eight out of ten lab sessions.

Held for new first year students Extra Time

LING 100.01 The Noun 6 credits

Open: Size: 16, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61429

Cherlon L Ussery

We've all been taught that nouns are people, places, and things. Yet, these seemingly simple linguistic objects are surprisingly complex. For instance, languages vary in what information (e.g., case, gender, person, number) nouns display. Even within a single language, the form of a noun may change depending on its function within a sentence or its function within a conversation. This course uses contemporary linguistic theories to account for the many varied forms of nouns throughout the world's languages. No familiarity with languages other than English is required.

Held for new first year students

NEUR 127.52 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
1:00pm5:00pm
Synonym: 61917

Eric D Hoopfer

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

NEUR 127.53 Foundations in Neuroscience and Lab 6 credits

Closed: Size: 20, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235 / Hulings B04

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am2:00pm6:00pm10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61918

Eric D Hoopfer

This course is an introduction to basic neural function. Topics include neural transmission, development of the nervous system, anatomy, sensory systems, learning and the corresponding change in the brain, and the role of the nervous system in behavior. Team-based learning will be used to understand the experiments that shape current knowledge.

POSC 223.00 Political Science Lab: Content Analysis 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62475

Barbara Allen

How do we know if a news organization is ideologically biased? How do we show that gender influences how world leaders approach defense policy? How do we track the growth in misinformation in political advertising worldwide? One foundational methodology for studying questions like these is content analysis. This course will enable you to analyze the texts of speeches, debates, news stories, tweets, press conferences, letters, ad texts--and the visual representations that accompany many of these forms of communication. Students will learn the basics of defining content, operationalizing variables, and conducting the analysis to get valid, reliable data.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 230.00 Methods of Political Research 6 credits

Closed: Size: 18, Registered: 18, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 62476

Christina E Farhart

An introduction to research method, research design, and the analysis of political data. The course is intended to introduce students to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they are employed in the discipline. The course will consider the philosophy of scientific research generally, the philosophy of social science research, theory building and theory testing, the components of applied (quantitative and qualitative) research across the major sub-fields of political science, and basic methodological tools. Intended for majors only.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120, 230, 250, (formerly Mathematics 215, 245, 275) or AP Statistics (score of 4 or 5)

POSC 265.00 Public Policy and Global Capitalism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62492

Greg G Marfleet

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to comparative and international public policy. It examines major theories and approaches to public policy design and implementation in several major areas: international policy economy (including the study of international trade and monetary policy, financial regulation, and comparative welfare policy), global public health and comparative healthcare policy, institutional development (including democratic governance, accountability systems, and judicial reform), and environmental public policy.

Prerequisite: Statistics 120 (formerly Mathematics 215) strongly recommended, or instructor permission

PSYC 238.00 Memory Processes 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 32, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61769

Mija M Van Der Wege

Memory is involved in nearly every human activity: We use our memory not only when we reminisce about the past, but when we study for our exams, talk to our friends, and tie our shoes. This course explores the psychological science of human memory. We will examine different types of memory, how we encode new memories and retrieve old ones, how to ensure a memory is never forgotten, and how to implant a false memory in someone else. In doing so we will look at both old and new research, and discuss how memory research can be applied to some real world environments, such as courtrooms and classrooms. By the end of the course you will be familiar with the major issues in the field of memory research and be able to evaluate the quality of the studies used as evidence in these debates.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

PSYC 239 not offered, will not complete LS

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You must take 6 credits of each of these.
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except Quantitative Reasoning, which requires 3 courses.
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