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Your search for courses for 21/FA and with Special Interest: SPECINTAPPACAD found 22 courses.

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BIOL 215.00 Agroecology 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 323

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62062

David Hougen-Eitzman

Agriculture comprises the greatest single type of land use on the planet--as such, what happens on farms will have far-reaching effects on all other systems on the biosphere. With world human population growing exponentially, the search for sustainable agricultural systems is more important than ever. This course focuses on the scientific aspects of food production, which will involve the application of the principles of ecosystem and population ecology to agricultural systems. Topics covered will include organic farming, biotechnology, and effects of pesticide use. Several types of local farms will be visited--large, small, organic, conventional.

Prerequisite: One introductory science lab course (Biology 125, 126, Chemistry 123, 128, Geology 110, 115, 120 or 125).; Requires concurrent registration in Biology 216

BIOL 216.00 Agroecology Lab 2 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Location To Be Announced

MTWTHF
2:00pm6:00pm
Synonym: 62063

David Hougen-Eitzman

These lab sessions will mainly involve visits to local area farms. The visits will provide an opportunity to examine biological processes on real farms and the environmental effects of different farming methods. This laboratory portion of the class will include a community engagement aspect, where class groups complete projects that provide services to farmers or community organizations.

Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in Biology 215 is required

CAMS 270.00 Nonfiction 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 10, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 133

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 61953

Laska Jimsen

This course addresses nonfiction media as both art form and historical practice by exploring the expressive, rhetorical, and political possibilities of nonfiction production. A focus on relationships between form and content and between makers, subjects, and viewers will inform our approach. Throughout the course we will pay special attention to the ethical concerns that arise from making media about others' lives. We will engage with diverse modes of nonfiction production including essayistic, experimental, and participatory forms and create community videos in partnership with Carleton's Center for Community and Civic Engagement and local organizations. The class culminates in the production of a significant independent nonfiction media project.

Prerequisite: Cinema and Media Studies 111 and one additional Cinema and Media Studies course or instructor permission

Extra Time Required

EDUC 234.00 Educational Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62405

Deborah Appleman

Human development and learning theories are studied in relation to the teaching-learning process and the sociocultural contexts of schools. Three hours outside of class per week are devoted to observing learning activities in public school elementary and secondary classrooms and working with students.

Extra Time required.

ENGL 100.02 How We Read: The History and Science of Reading 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61421

George G Shuffelton

Humans have been reading for 5,000 years, a period too short to be explained in evolutionary terms but long enough for the purposes and social values of reading to have changed considerably.  This class begins with an examination of the cognitive process of reading and then considers what reading has meant to readers at different times.  We'll examine the motivations and reading practices of medieval monks, Renaissance diplomats, enslaved Americans, and midwestern housewives.  We'll reflect on what happens when we read a difficult poem, and we'll read Napoleon's favorite novel as example of how reading can be enchanting, inspiring, and dangerously self-destructive.  We'll consider our own histories as readers and examine reading at the present moment, including the way reading on screens may (or may not) be changing our habits.

Held for new first year students

ENGL 100.04 Drama, Film, and Society 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Laird 218

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 61419

Pierre Hecker

With an emphasis on critical reading, writing, and the fundamentals of college-level research, this course will develop students' knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the relationship between drama and film and the social and cultural contexts of which they are (or were) a part and product. The course explores the various ways in which these plays and movies (which might include anything and everything from Spike Lee to Tony Kushner to Christopher Marlowe) generate meaning, with particular attention to the social, historical, and political realities that contribute to that meaning. An important component of this course will be attending live performances in the Twin Cities. These required events may be during the week and/or the weekend.

Held for new first year students. Extra Time required.

ENTS 215.00 Environmental Ethics 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 23, Waitlist: 0

Willis 114

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm

Requirements Met:

Synonym: 62173

Kimberly K Smith

This course is an introduction to the central ethical debates in environmental policy and practice, as well as some of the major traditions of environmental thought. It investigates such questions as whether we can have moral duties towards animals, ecosystems, or future generations; what is the ethical basis for wilderness preservation; and what is the relationship between environmentalism and social justice.

HIST 100.01 American Farms and Food 6 credits

George H Vrtis

What's for dinner? The answers to that question--and others like it--have never been more complicated or consequential than they are today. Behind a glance into the refrigerator or the shelves of any supermarket lie a myriad of concerns, ideas, and cultural developments that touch on everything from health and nutrition to taste, tradition, identity, time, cost, and environmental stewardship. This seminar will consider the evolution of these interconnected issues in American history, giving particular attention to the rise, inner workings, and effects of the agro-industrial food system and to contemporary movements that seek a new path forward.

Held for new first year students

HIST 116.00 Intro to Indigenous Histories, 1887-present 6 credits

Closed: Size: 30, Registered: 30, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 236

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62436

Meredith L McCoy

Many Americans grow up with a fictionalized view of Indigenous people (sometimes also called Native Americans/American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians within the U.S. context). Understanding Indigenous peoples’ histories, presents, and possible futures requires moving beyond these stereotypes and listening to Indigenous perspectives. In this class, we will begin to learn about Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island and the Pacific through tribal histories, legislation, Supreme Court cases, and personal narratives. The course will focus on the period from 1887 to 2018 with major themes including (among others) agency, resistance, resilience, settler colonialism, discrimination, and structural racism.

HIST 200.00 Historians for Hire 2 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 4, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
12:30pm1:40pm12:30pm1:40pm1:10pm2:10pm
Synonym: 62440

Antony E Adler

A two-credit course in which students work with faculty oversight to complete a variety of public history projects with community partners. Students will work on a research project requiring them to identify and analyze primary sources, draw conclusions from the primary source research, and share their research with the appropriate audience in an appropriate form. We meet once a week at Carleton to ensure students maintain professional standards and strong relationships in their work. Potential projects include educational programming, historical society archival work, and a variety of local history opportunities. 

Extra Time Required

HIST 239.00 Hunger, Public Policy and Food Provision in History 6 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 17, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 330

MTWTHF
11:10am12:20pm11:10am12:20pm12:00pm1:00pm
Synonym: 62444

Susannah R Ottaway

For the first four weeks, the course covers the comparative history of famine, and will be led by internationally renowned economic historian Cormac O’Grada, the 2020 Ott Family Lecturer in Economic History at Carleton College.  We examine causes and consequences (political, economic, demographic) and the historical memories of famines as well as case studies from Imperial Britain, Bengal and Ireland. In the second half of term, the course broadens its focus to examine the persistence of hunger and the nature of public policies related to food provision in comparative historical contexts.

IDSC 100.02 Data Visualization As Activism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 15, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Library 305

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 60547

Lin S Winton

Data visualization and activism have a common goal: to make the invisible more visible. This seminar will focus on the strengths and limitations of graphs and other charts to illuminate and convince. We will examine landmark visualizations that have changed history, starting with W.E.B. Du Bois's famous "data portraits", which debuted at the 1900 Paris World's Fair to tell a complex story of agency, sophistication, and oppression of African Americans in post-emancipation America. As we discuss the role of data viz in activism, we will learn to create our own visual arguments. No previous experience with statistics or graphing software is necessary.

Held for new first year students Only students eligible for TRIO should select this course. If you apply to TRIO but are not admitted, you will be allowed to change your course selection. TRIO Student Support Services is a program that serves U.S. citizens and permanent residents who meet established income requirements, are first-generation in college, and/or who have a documented disability., Instructor Permission Required

IDSC 285.00 Community-based Learning & Scholarship: Ethics, Practice 3 credits, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 5, Waitlist: 0

Willis 203

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm

Requirements Met:

Other Tags:

Synonym: 62601

Emily Oliver

This class will explore central concepts in community-based learning and scholarship, as well as examine discourses about the public purpose of higher education and the civic imagination. While studying recurrent ethical questions involved in community-college collaborations, such as how to honor diverse forms of knowledge, build reciprocity and share power, students will collaboratively design an academic civic engagement project. The class will critically reflect on their own civic learning, capacity, and action. Students will envision how they want to live in community with others, as citizens and stewards.

IDSC 298.00 FOCUS Sophomore Colloquium 1 credit, S/CR/NC only

Open: Size: 33, Registered: 31, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:20pm
Synonym: 61402

Fernan Jaramillo

This colloquium is designed for sophomore students participating in the Focusing on Cultivating Scientists program. It will provide an opportunity to participate in STEM-based projects on campus and in the community. The topics of this project-based colloquium will vary each term.

Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary Studies 198 as first year student

Prior registration in IDSC 198

MATH 295.00 Mathematics and Democracy 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

CMC 209

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am

Other Tags:

Synonym: 60713

Deanna B Haunsperger

In a democratic society we are confronted with problems of implementing fairness. How can we build a representative government, measure society's preferences, or fairly divide power? Many of these problems are amenable to mathematical analysis and, in many cases, there exist deep theories and rich historical narratives of attempts at solution. We will study three such problems all of current political and mathematical interest: apportionment of representation, voting, and gerrymandering. We will approach these problems by considering what abstract properties a "fair" solution should have then attempting to construct and analyze procedures that maximize our measures of fairness.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 232 or Mathematics 236

PHYS 152.59 Introduction to Physics: Environmental Physics and Lab 3 credits

Open: Size: 24, Registered: 15, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 223 / Anderson Hall 021

MTWTHF
9:50am11:00am9:50am11:00am8:00am12:00pm9:40am10:40am
Synonym: 61859

Arjendu K Pattanayak

An introduction to principles of physics and their application to the environment. Topics include energy and its flows, engines, energy efficiency, energy usage and conservation in vehicles and buildings, the atmosphere, and climate change. Comfort with algebra and the integration and differentiation of elementary functions is assumed. Weekly laboratory work or field trips.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101, 111 (completion or concurrent registration) and Physics 131 (completion or concurrent registration), 143, 144 or 145

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 223.00 Political Science Lab: Content Analysis 3 credits

Open: Size: 25, Registered: 13, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 235

MTWTHF
3:10pm4:55pm3:10pm4:55pm
Synonym: 62475

Barbara Allen

How do we know if a news organization is ideologically biased? How do we show that gender influences how world leaders approach defense policy? How do we track the growth in misinformation in political advertising worldwide? One foundational methodology for studying questions like these is content analysis. This course will enable you to analyze the texts of speeches, debates, news stories, tweets, press conferences, letters, ad texts--and the visual representations that accompany many of these forms of communication. Students will learn the basics of defining content, operationalizing variables, and conducting the analysis to get valid, reliable data.

2nd 5 weeks

POSC 274.00 Globalization, Pandemics, and Human Security 6 credits

Tun Myint

What are the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic on global politics and public policy? How do state responses to COVID-19 as well as historical cases such as the Black Death in Europe, the SARS outbreak in East Asia and Middle East, and the Ebola outbreak in Africa help us understand the scientific, political, and economic challenges of pandemics on countries and communities around the world? We will apply theories and concepts from IR, political economy, and natural sciences to explore these questions and consider what we can learn from those responses to address other global challenges like climate change.

POSC 307.00 Go Our Own Way: Autonomy in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement* 6 credits

Open: Size: 15, Registered: 7, Waitlist: 0

Weitz Center 136

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 62495

Barbara Allen

“Every civil rights bill was passed for white people, not black people. I am a human being. I know … I have right(s). White people didn’t know that. … so [they] had to … to tell that white man, 'he’s a human being, don’t stop him.' That bill was for the white man…. I knew [my rights] all the time.” Stokely Carmichael spoke for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee viewpoint in 1966. The Black Panther Party enacted basic civic responsibilities in their programs. Ella Baker spoke of autonomy in community. This seminar brings voices across generations speaking to current affairs.

PSYC 260.00 Health Psychology 6 credits

Closed: Size: 25, Registered: 25, Waitlist: 0

Anderson Hall 121

MTWTHF
1:50pm3:00pm1:50pm3:00pm2:20pm3:20pm
Synonym: 61778

Gisel G Flores-Montoya

This course will examine how psychological principles can be employed to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and encourage adherence to disease treatment regimens. Within a biopsychosocial framework, we will analyze behavioral patterns and public policies that influence risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic pain, substance abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases, among other conditions. Additionally, students in groups will critically examine the effects of local policies on health outcomes and propose policy changes supported by theory and research. A grade of C- or better must be earned in both Psychology 260 and 261 to satisfy the LS requirement.

Prerequisite: Psychology 110

RELG 100.02 Christianity and Colonialism 6 credits

Closed: Size: 16, Registered: 16, Waitlist: 0

Leighton 303

MTWTHF
1:15pm3:00pm1:15pm3:00pm
Synonym: 61434

Kristin C Bloomer

From its beginnings, Christianity has been concerned with the making of new persons and worlds: the creation of the Kingdom of Heaven on earth. It has also maintained a tight relationship to power, empire, and the making of modernity. In this course we will investigate this relationship within the context of colonial projects in the Americas, Africa, India, and the Pacific. We will trace the making of modern selves from Columbus to the abolition (and remainders) of slavery, and from the arrival of Cook in the Sandwich Islands to the journals of missionaries and the contemporary fight for Hawaiian sovereignty.

Held for new first year students

STAT 285.00 Statistical Consulting 2 credits, S/CR/NC only

Closed: Size: 0, Registered: 9, Waitlist: 0

CMC 201

MTWTHF
10:10am11:55am
Synonym: 61449

Andy N Poppick

(Formerly MATH 280) Students will apply their statistical knowledge by analyzing data problems solicited from the Northfield community. Students will also learn basic consulting skills, including communication and ethics.

Prerequisite: Statistics 230 (formerly Mathematics 245) and instructor permission

Formerly Mathematics 280

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